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Old 08-10-2003, 10:24 PM
Seymour Man
 
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Default Wanting professional book advice

Hello,

I am getting serious about my cooking. One thing I would like to have
is some
sort of professional techniques book. It doesnt have to have to have
recipes just techniques.

Right now the book i use the most is Joy of Cooking, but would like
something more advanced.

I am not interested in chapters on running a business, cooking for 25,
etc.

Just strictly techniques.

I have heard of CIA The professional chef and gisslen's book on
professional cooking. What are the differences and would there be
better choices.

Also i have found that for example u can buy a previous edition of
these books on Ebay pretty cheap. Since i am interested in only
techniques would these suffice?


Thanks

Duane

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Old 09-10-2003, 09:26 AM
jacqui{JB}
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wanting professional book advice

"Seymour Man" wrote in message
om...

I am getting serious about my cooking. One
thing I would like to have is some sort of
professional techniques book. It doesnt have
to have to have recipes just techniques.

Right now the book i use the most is Joy
of Cooking, but would like something more
advanced.

snip

There are lots and lots of choices out there; each book brings a
slightly different perspective. Here's a sample of what I've got on
my shelves (this comes from an admitted cookbook slut, with around
1500 cookbooks in my collection):

* Culinary Institute of America's "New Professional Chef"
* "La Varenne Pratique"
* "The Professional Pastry Chef"
* Julia Child's "The Way to Cook" and "Baking with Julia"
* Charlotte Turgeon's (editor of Larousse Gastronomique) "Creative
Cooking Course", 1982 and 1985 editions
* James Petersons "Essentials of Cooking," "Sauces," "Vegetables,"
"Splendid Soups" and "Fish and Shellfish"
* The Grand Diplome Cooking Course (20 volume set)
* Charlie Trotter's "The Kitchen Sessions," "Seafood" and
"Desserts" -- he talks a lot about ingredients and flavor
combinations, which I find very interesting (plus the books are
visually beautiful)

And no food library is complete without:
* "The Oxford Companion to Food"
* "Larousse Gastronomique"
* "The Larousse Encyclopedia of Wine"
* Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking"

And Shirley Corrigher's "Cookwise" (which I don't have yet, so clearly
my own library's nothing *like* complete yet ).

A lot of it depends on your emphasis: do you bake a lot (see Alice
Medrich's book "Cocolat")? Do you grill a lot/want to make the
ultimate barbeque (Steven Raichlen's "Barbecue Bible" is a great
reference)?

I'd suggest a trip either to the library or to your local big
bookstore for some serious browsing. Hope this helps -- good luck!
-j


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Old 09-10-2003, 03:01 PM
MrAoD
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wanting professional book advice

jacqui{JB}" writes:

"Seymour Man" wrote in message
. com...

I am getting serious about my cooking. One
thing I would like to have is some sort of
professional techniques book. It doesnt have
to have to have recipes just techniques.

Right now the book i use the most is Joy
of Cooking, but would like something more
advanced.

snip

There are lots and lots of choices out there; each book brings a
slightly different perspective. Here's a sample of what I've got on
my shelves (this comes from an admitted cookbook slut, with around
1500 cookbooks in my collection):


And no recommendation of Pepin's La Technique?

shame, shame . . .

g

Marc

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Old 09-10-2003, 05:39 PM
jacqui{JB}
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wanting professional book advice

"MrAoD" wrote in message
...

And no recommendation of Pepin's La Technique?


The only book of his I have in my collection is his collaboration with
Julia Child. I've seen his shows occasionally (or at least I saw them
before I moved out of the US ); I admit to not being a big fan, for
no one particular reason.

-j




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Old 09-10-2003, 06:31 PM
Seymour Man
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wanting professional book advice

"jacqui{JB}" wrote in message ...




Thanks for your response to my question about professional cookbooks.

1 question I have is this. You can purchase previous editions of
books like Larousse or Professional Chef on Ebay for $5-10 in very
nice condition.

Since I am only interested in cooking techiniques and ingredient
preparations and such and not recipes would these be recommended.

I guess my question is how much different would the 2001 edition of
Larousse be from the 1988 edition? And the same with The New
Professional Chef. CIA seems to put out a new editon every few years.
What really changes?

Thanks
Duane Riggs


"Seymour Man" wrote in message
om...

I am getting serious about my cooking. One
thing I would like to have is some sort of
professional techniques book. It doesnt have
to have to have recipes just techniques.

Right now the book i use the most is Joy
of Cooking, but would like something more
advanced.

snip

There are lots and lots of choices out there; each book brings a
slightly different perspective. Here's a sample of what I've got on
my shelves (this comes from an admitted cookbook slut, with around
1500 cookbooks in my collection):





* Culinary Institute of America's "New Professional Chef"
* "La Varenne Pratique"
* "The Professional Pastry Chef"
* Julia Child's "The Way to Cook" and "Baking with Julia"
* Charlotte Turgeon's (editor of Larousse Gastronomique) "Creative
Cooking Course", 1982 and 1985 editions
* James Petersons "Essentials of Cooking," "Sauces," "Vegetables,"
"Splendid Soups" and "Fish and Shellfish"
* The Grand Diplome Cooking Course (20 volume set)
* Charlie Trotter's "The Kitchen Sessions," "Seafood" and
"Desserts" -- he talks a lot about ingredients and flavor
combinations, which I find very interesting (plus the books are
visually beautiful)

And no food library is complete without:
* "The Oxford Companion to Food"
* "Larousse Gastronomique"
* "The Larousse Encyclopedia of Wine"
* Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking"

And Shirley Corrigher's "Cookwise" (which I don't have yet, so clearly
my own library's nothing *like* complete yet ).

A lot of it depends on your emphasis: do you bake a lot (see Alice
Medrich's book "Cocolat")? Do you grill a lot/want to make the
ultimate barbeque (Steven Raichlen's "Barbecue Bible" is a great
reference)?

I'd suggest a trip either to the library or to your local big
bookstore for some serious browsing. Hope this helps -- good luck!
-j

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Old 10-10-2003, 09:38 AM
MrAoD
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wanting professional book advice

"jacqui{JB}" write:

"MrAoD" wrote in message
...

And no recommendation of Pepin's La Technique?


The only book of his I have in my collection is his collaboration with
Julia Child. I've seen his shows occasionally (or at least I saw them
before I moved out of the US ); I admit to not being a big fan, for
no one particular reason.


Eh, he's a calm fellow which I find restful.

Seriously, if you can find it in a library do so you might be pleasantly
surprised.

Techniques and ingredients, exactly what the OP was asking for.

Best,

Marc

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Old 10-10-2003, 02:35 PM
Peter Aitken
 
Posts: n/a
Default Wanting professional book advice

"MrAoD" wrote in message
...
"jacqui{JB}" write:

"MrAoD" wrote in message
...

And no recommendation of Pepin's La Technique?


The only book of his I have in my collection is his collaboration with
Julia Child. I've seen his shows occasionally (or at least I saw them
before I moved out of the US ); I admit to not being a big fan, for
no one particular reason.


Eh, he's a calm fellow which I find restful.

Seriously, if you can find it in a library do so you might be pleasantly
surprised.

Techniques and ingredients, exactly what the OP was asking for.

Best,

Marc


I am new to this thread so pardon me if this has already been mentioned. The
Professional Chef is 1100+ pages of detailed information. It is about half
ingredients and techniques and half recipes. Lots of photos, very useful.


--
Peter Aitken

Remove the crap from my email address before using.




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