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Old 14-01-2007, 01:38 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux

So, now that I learned that I didn't cook my pot roast long enough,
does the same go for pork loin?

I usually cook pork roast with a temperature probe, to about 160 F,
then let it rest for 10 minutes.

Should I be cooking it longer?

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Old 14-01-2007, 01:46 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux

"Mitch" [email protected] wrote in message

So, now that I learned that I didn't cook my pot roast long enough,
does the same go for pork loin?

I usually cook pork roast with a temperature probe, to about 160 F,
then let it rest for 10 minutes.

Should I be cooking it longer?


Pork loin? No! Cooktoabout 138, the wrap/cover and rest. It'll be nice
and juicy and tender,

BOB


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Old 14-01-2007, 02:21 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux


Cook pork loin to 145 internal temp. Otherwise it dries out and
gets tough.


BTW, many people and sites will tell you 155-160. They're full
of shit.



Thanks. At 145, will the pink be gone?
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Old 14-01-2007, 02:26 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux

In article ,
Mitch [email protected] wrote:

So, now that I learned that I didn't cook my pot roast long enough,
does the same go for pork loin?

I usually cook pork roast with a temperature probe, to about 160 F,
then let it rest for 10 minutes.

Should I be cooking it longer?


No! But you should be browning the pork loin and *roasting* it for a
comparatively short time. An hour and a half at 350F would probably be
too much. I braise pot roasts for a long time, three to four hours,
after browning. You're comparing the best of the pig to the worst of the
cow for cooking time and method.
My last sentence was a bit strong and I retract it half way.

leo

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Old 14-01-2007, 06:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux

In article ,
Mitch [email protected] wrote:

So, now that I learned that I didn't cook my pot roast long enough,
does the same go for pork loin?

I usually cook pork roast with a temperature probe, to about 160 F,
then let it rest for 10 minutes.

Should I be cooking it longer?


Pork is always more tender than beef IME. :-)

Should not be as much of an issue.
--
Peace, Om

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"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson


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Old 14-01-2007, 06:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux


Mitch wrote:
So, now that I learned that I didn't cook my pot roast long enough,
does the same go for pork loin?

I usually cook pork roast with a temperature probe, to about 160 F,
then let it rest for 10 minutes.

Should I be cooking it longer?


Stick yer temperature probe up yer arse, you should just give up.

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Old 14-01-2007, 11:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux


"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 02:21:40 GMT, Mitch wrote:

Cook pork loin to 145 internal temp. Otherwise it dries out and
gets tough.

BTW, many people and sites will tell you 155-160. They're full
of shit.


Thanks. At 145, will the pink be gone?


Mostly. A slight pink is good, though.

Actually Bob had it right. Remove sooner than 145, so that the
final resting temp is 145.

-sw


But there are still people that won't go anywhere near pink pork.


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Old 14-01-2007, 11:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux


"Mitch" [email protected] wrote in message
...
So, now that I learned that I didn't cook my pot roast long enough,
does the same go for pork loin?

I usually cook pork roast with a temperature probe, to about 160 F,
then let it rest for 10 minutes.

Should I be cooking it longer?


Missed Part 1. Did you braise or bake the pot roast?


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Old 14-01-2007, 12:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux


Stick yer temperature probe up yer arse, you should just give up.


Honestly, I've given you the benefit of the doubt because every now
and then you can be lucid.... but you insist on staying off your meds,
so you're going back into the Bozo bin - AGAIN.


Since I don't see what you're replying to, I assume it's the king of
the assholes.

I wonder how the fat prick would act to someone's face, especially
knowing that I'm cooking for a family, plus taking care of my wife who
had a stroke.

There really are people in this world who are unfit to live.


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Old 14-01-2007, 01:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux

"Kswck" wrote in message

"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 02:21:40 GMT, Mitch wrote:

Cook pork loin to 145 internal temp. Otherwise it dries out
and gets tough.

BTW, many people and sites will tell you 155-160. They're full
of shit.

Thanks. At 145, will the pink be gone?


Mostly. A slight pink is good, though.

Actually Bob had it right. Remove sooner than 145, so that the
final resting temp is 145.

-sw


But there are still people that won't go anywhere near pink pork.


Then let them eat dry, practically tasteless pork jerky.
;-)

BOB


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Old 14-01-2007, 02:03 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux

In article ,
"Kswck" wrote:

"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 02:21:40 GMT, Mitch wrote:

Cook pork loin to 145 internal temp. Otherwise it dries out and
gets tough.

BTW, many people and sites will tell you 155-160. They're full
of shit.

Thanks. At 145, will the pink be gone?


Mostly. A slight pink is good, though.

Actually Bob had it right. Remove sooner than 145, so that the
final resting temp is 145.

-sw


But there are still people that won't go anywhere near pink pork.


Like chicken.

I've finally taught dad that chicken slightly pink at the bone is not
only ok, but desirable! Especially when it comes to breast meat.

(shaddup shel' baby! G)
--
Peace, Om

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"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 14-01-2007, 02:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux

In article ,
Mitch [email protected] wrote:

Stick yer temperature probe up yer arse, you should just give up.


Honestly, I've given you the benefit of the doubt because every now
and then you can be lucid.... but you insist on staying off your meds,
so you're going back into the Bozo bin - AGAIN.


Since I don't see what you're replying to, I assume it's the king of
the assholes.


No, she was responding to PVC.
(Projective Vomit Chick)


I wonder how the fat prick would act to someone's face, especially
knowing that I'm cooking for a family, plus taking care of my wife who
had a stroke.

There really are people in this world who are unfit to live.


Ok, as ugly as Shel' can get sometimes, he's not a bad person overall...
Really!
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 14-01-2007, 03:23 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux

BOB wrote:
"Kswck" wrote in message

"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...
On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 02:21:40 GMT, Mitch wrote:



But there are still people that won't go anywhere near pink pork.


Then let them eat dry, practically tasteless pork jerky.
;-)

BOB


I agree. We always cook our pork to pink and it's juicy and tender. I'll
never go the other way again. My MIL loves to cook things to shoeleather.
When we're invited over to her house for dinner, *we* do the cooking. (We
just let her "finish" hers up!) g

kili



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Old 14-01-2007, 05:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Tough pot roast: Part Deux

In article ,
Alan wrote:

On Sun, 14 Jan 2007 00:09:12 -0600, Omelet
wrote:

In article ,
Mitch [email protected] wrote:

So, now that I learned that I didn't cook my pot roast long enough,
does the same go for pork loin?

I usually cook pork roast with a temperature probe, to about 160 F,
then let it rest for 10 minutes.

Should I be cooking it longer?


Pork is always more tender than beef IME. :-)

Should not be as much of an issue.


Y'all gotta remember there is a BIG difference between
"pot roast" and almost any other kind of roast meat.


Yes.


Pot roast uses a tough cut of beef, and cooks it long and
slow until it becomes tender. Usually covered.


But you CAN potroast pork, or poultry.
Or venison, emu, buffalo, Ostrich, Hippo, Alligator........


Almost any other kind of roast meat uses a tender cut of
meat and dry roasts it just until it is done to the cook's
liking, and then gets it out of the heat before it gets
tough.


Not always.
Bird meat is never marbled.
No matter what the ratite.
And ratite meat is red due to the nature of the bird.

But I did note that you said "Almost" . Well done. :-)


If you understand this difference between the cuts of meat
and how they're cooked, you'll find things get simpler!

Alan


Yes.

Long slow cooing works......... for the most part.
Never 100% of the time?

IMHO?

Reptile meat is one meat that I've not experimented with. I imagine that
it'd be like poultry since they are so closely related?
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson


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