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Old 06-12-2006, 05:04 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

Hello,

We just moved into a new house, and the built in wooden cutting board,
although new, makes everything that touches it taste like
onion/garlic/...

Is there any way to take this bad taste out of the wooden block? I'm
pretty sure there's a trick for it.

Thanks,
Hilbert


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Old 06-12-2006, 05:16 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste


Hilbert wrote:


We just moved into a new house, and the built in wooden cutting board,
although new, makes everything that touches it taste like
onion/garlic/...


Well, then that board can't be new, someone must have used it for
garlic and onions, don't you agree?

Is there any way to take this bad taste out of the wooden block? I'm
pretty sure there's a trick for it.


Apply a paste of lemon juice with salt and let it sit a few hours.

Then once you get the stink out don't use that built in board for any
foods again... it's now a desk for your kitchen PC. For foods get
yourself a collection of inexpensive plastic boards that will fit into
your dishwasher.

Sheldon

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Old 06-12-2006, 05:28 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste


Hilbert wrote:
Hello,

We just moved into a new house, and the built in wooden cutting board,
although new, makes everything that touches it taste like
onion/garlic/...

Is there any way to take this bad taste out of the wooden block? I'm
pretty sure there's a trick for it.

Thanks,
Hilbert



Don't believe any of the old wive's tales about wood cutting boards
being unsanitary. Check out this site :

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Cutti...s/AllAbout.htm

If your questions aren't answered, just keep Googling.

A good wooden cutting board will last a lifetime. My sister has one
that belonged to our grandmother, probably over 70 years old. She
wouldn't part with it for a million dollars.

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Old 06-12-2006, 05:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste


Hilbert wrote:
Hello,

We just moved into a new house, and the built in wooden cutting board,
although new, makes everything that touches it taste like
onion/garlic/...

Is there any way to take this bad taste out of the wooden block? I'm
pretty sure there's a trick for it.

Thanks,
Hilbert



Don't believe any of the old wive's tales about wood cutting boards
being unsanitary. Check out this site :

http://whatscookingamerica.net/Cutti...s/AllAbout.htm

If your questions aren't answered, just keep Googling.

A good wooden cutting board will last a lifetime. My sister has one
that belonged to our grandmother, probably over 70 years old. She
wouldn't part with it for a million dollars.

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Old 06-12-2006, 12:19 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

Hilbert wrote:
Hello,

We just moved into a new house, and the built in wooden cutting board,
although new, makes everything that touches it taste like
onion/garlic/...

Is there any way to take this bad taste out of the wooden block? I'm
pretty sure there's a trick for it.


No tricks, just techniques. You want to clean the board and
then oil it. A good dish detergent, a scrub brush and about
5 minutes of elbow grease to start. Wipe/rinse with clear
water several times. Then do it a couple more times. Let it
air-dry for a few hours and don't put anything on the
counter during that time. Then oil it. This is a subject of
heated discussion between the mineral oil set and the ones
who say any oil except the strongly flavored ones. Take your
choice. Wipe it all over the wooden surface. Come back an
hour later and do it again. And, if you have OCD, come back
an hour later and do it again.

You now have a basic finish on the counter. Wash gently
after each use, and oil every few weeks. It'll last forever.
After a while, it may show scratches or mars. A bit of
sandpaper will take care of that quickly. Then wipe and oil
again. It will actually be a lot less maintenance than it
sounds like here.

Pastorio


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Old 06-12-2006, 02:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

Thanks for the ideas. I'll try the scrubbing with salt and lemon, and
then oil the cutting block. Hopefully it will save it.

And in the meantime I'll probably get some cutting matts.

Thanks!



On Dec 6, 6:19 am, "Bob (this one)" wrote:
Hilbert wrote:
Hello,


We just moved into a new house, and the built in wooden cutting board,
although new, makes everything that touches it taste like
onion/garlic/...


Is there any way to take this bad taste out of the wooden block? I'm
pretty sure there's a trick for it.No tricks, just techniques. You want to clean the board and

then oil it. A good dish detergent, a scrub brush and about
5 minutes of elbow grease to start. Wipe/rinse with clear
water several times. Then do it a couple more times. Let it
air-dry for a few hours and don't put anything on the
counter during that time. Then oil it. This is a subject of
heated discussion between the mineral oil set and the ones
who say any oil except the strongly flavored ones. Take your
choice. Wipe it all over the wooden surface. Come back an
hour later and do it again. And, if you have OCD, come back
an hour later and do it again.

You now have a basic finish on the counter. Wash gently
after each use, and oil every few weeks. It'll last forever.
After a while, it may show scratches or mars. A bit of
sandpaper will take care of that quickly. Then wipe and oil
again. It will actually be a lot less maintenance than it
sounds like here.

Pastorio


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Old 06-12-2006, 04:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste


Hilbert wrote:
Thanks for the ideas. I'll try the scrubbing with salt and lemon, and
then oil the cutting block. Hopefully it will save it.


I thought you said it was brand new, only that it had a smell from
onion/garlic, so what's to save?
Anyway built-in countertop boards are not at all utile, they are for
decoration... makes no sense to use a built in board as there is no way
to clean it properly and it will need cleaning each and every time it
is used, especially for anything wet... and why need to clean such a
large surface when something a quarter it's size will do just fine for
most kitchen tasks, certainly to dismember onions and garlic. Some
built-in boards are made removeable, they lift/slide out, then at least
they can be much more easily cared for without damage to the
surrounding countertop, but still they're best used only for dry work
like baking. If your's is not the removeable type I'd not use it other
than for it's original intent, a decoration, essentially it's
furniture.

And in the meantime I'll probably get some cutting matts.


Outstanding decision... get a bunch of variously sized plastic boards,
mostly you'll use the smaller ones, say 8" X 12"/14". The modern
plastic boards are more gentile on cutlery than wood and are so easy to
clean/maintain.

I no longer use my decorative wood cutting boards other than for
presentation/serving; cheeses, sausages, fruit, bread.

Sheldon

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Old 06-12-2006, 05:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

In article .com,
"Hilbert" wrote:

Hello,

We just moved into a new house, and the built in wooden cutting board,
although new, makes everything that touches it taste like
onion/garlic/...

Is there any way to take this bad taste out of the wooden block? I'm
pretty sure there's a trick for it.

Thanks,
Hilbert


Vinegar should work...

Or just get a new cutting board and use that over it.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 06-12-2006, 06:00 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

Sheldon wrote:

The modern plastic boards are more gentile


Um, sure.

Pastorio
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Old 06-12-2006, 10:10 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

Bob (this one) wrote:


No tricks, just techniques. You want to clean the board and then oil it.
A good dish detergent, a scrub brush and about 5 minutes of elbow grease
to start. Wipe/rinse with clear water several times. Then do it a couple
more times. Let it air-dry for a few hours and don't put anything on the
counter during that time.


I might give it a light sanding at this point, since the water can raise
the grain on the wood. Just a couple of swipes with a very fine grit
paper, until it feels smooth to the touch. Then oil it.



Dawn



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Old 07-12-2006, 12:25 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste


Omelet wrote:
In article .com,
"Hilbert" wrote:

Hello,

We just moved into a new house, and the built in wooden cutting board,
although new, makes everything that touches it taste like
onion/garlic/...

Is there any way to take this bad taste out of the wooden block? I'm
pretty sure there's a trick for it.

Thanks,
Hilbert


Vinegar should work...


Um, were're tawkin' how to do wooden boards, not copy cat summer's eve
recipes for dirty broads! hehe



Sheldon

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Old 07-12-2006, 03:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

On 5 Dec 2006 20:04:04 -0800, "Hilbert" wrote:

Hello,

We just moved into a new house, and the built in wooden cutting board,
although new, makes everything that touches it taste like
onion/garlic/...

Is there any way to take this bad taste out of the wooden block? I'm
pretty sure there's a trick for it.


A wooden board will pick up the onion juice... that's why we always
had two - one for savoury foods, and one for sweet ones.
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Old 07-12-2006, 07:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

Dawn wrote:
Bob (this one) wrote:

No tricks, just techniques. You want to clean the board and then oil
it. A good dish detergent, a scrub brush and about 5 minutes of elbow
grease to start. Wipe/rinse with clear water several times. Then do it
a couple more times. Let it air-dry for a few hours and don't put
anything on the counter during that time.


I might give it a light sanding at this point, since the water can raise
the grain on the wood. Just a couple of swipes with a very fine grit
paper, until it feels smooth to the touch. Then oil it.


Yep. Be very sure to wipe it with a lightly oiled tack cloth
a few times after sanding and before heavy oiling. Ask me
how I know that.

I use a 000 steel wool to tame the grain. It polishes the
wood nicely and doesn't remove much, so the wood surface
stays more even.

A finish I used when I was in the cutting board business -
wax instead of oil - had this formula.
1 ounce (weight) beeswax
4-6 fluid ounces neutral vegetable oil (soy, corn, peanut)
9-12 drops essential oil (any of several, available from
health food stores)
Warm the oil, drop in the beeswax and stir to melt. Add
essential oils and mix well. Pour into a jar, let cool and
put the lid on. I packaged it in 4-ounce canning jars - that
would last most people a long time. This recipe can be
multiplied. I used to give it as gifts to people who bought
my cutting boards. The wax is very soft and can be spread
very easily.

I bought the beeswax in case lots of 1-ounce blocks from a
Mennonite bulk foods store. The essential oils I mostly used
were herbal scents - oregano, basil, rosemary, thyme, sage
(go light on the rosemary oil). Other times I used citric
oils - lemon, lime, tangerine, bergamot, orange. The kitchen
smelled like food. I kept looking for oils like essence of
prime rib, lasagna or bouillabaise, but no luck.

To use the wax: Apply a thin layer to the wooden surface,
let sit for an hour or so then buff lightly. When I did it
for the cutting boards as a sealer/finish for the first
application, I heated the wax to a liquid and rubbed it in;
then buffed with a soft cloth. No hard labor, just a minute
or two's effort. And food-safe.

My suggestions for our customers was that any time after
that, just lightly rub a little on and give it a quick buff
as a touch-up finish. Between waxings - which might need to
be done every six months or so - use a light oil. Coat the
entire surface generously with your oil of choice and let it
sit for a couple hours to soak in. Come back and wipe the
surface with a paper towel to spread any oil still sitting
into the areas where it was all absorbed. Wipe it as dry as
you can. You're done. Wood finisher types suggest mineral
oil, and it works fine enough - make sure to get the
unscented stuff otherwise your cutting board will smell like
babies. They like to say that other oils will become rancid.
I've never known that to happen in lots of decades of using
wooden cutting boards. I use vegetable oils; have been on
boards I've had since the 60's and were made 50 years
earlier than that.

Pastorio
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Old 07-12-2006, 08:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

In article ,
"Bob (this one)" wrote:

A finish I used when I was in the cutting board business -
wax instead of oil - had this formula.
1 ounce (weight) beeswax
4-6 fluid ounces neutral vegetable oil (soy, corn, peanut)
9-12 drops essential oil (any of several, available from
health food stores)
Warm the oil, drop in the beeswax and stir to melt. Add
essential oils and mix well. Pour into a jar, let cool and
put the lid on. I packaged it in 4-ounce canning jars - that
would last most people a long time. This recipe can be
multiplied. I used to give it as gifts to people who bought
my cutting boards. The wax is very soft and can be spread
very easily.


Do you perchance still sell this stuff?

I know I could make my own but...... ;-)

Basil would be very nice.
--
Peace, Om

Remove _ to validate e-mails.

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch" -- Jack Nicholson
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Old 08-12-2006, 03:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default wooden cutting board - the taste

Omelet wrote:
In article ,
"Bob (this one)" wrote:

A finish I used when I was in the cutting board business -
wax instead of oil - had this formula.
1 ounce (weight) beeswax
4-6 fluid ounces neutral vegetable oil (soy, corn, peanut)
9-12 drops essential oil (any of several, available from
health food stores)
Warm the oil, drop in the beeswax and stir to melt. Add
essential oils and mix well. Pour into a jar, let cool and
put the lid on. I packaged it in 4-ounce canning jars - that
would last most people a long time. This recipe can be
multiplied. I used to give it as gifts to people who bought
my cutting boards. The wax is very soft and can be spread
very easily.


Do you perchance still sell this stuff?


I don't. And I don't even have some I could send you. Sorry.
I'm using my last jar now.

I know I could make my own but...... ;-)

Basil would be very nice.


It is. Why don't you make a bunch of it and put it in those
4-ounce canning jars - as gifts. Cheap, unique, useful,
memorable. It takes all of about 15 minutes to melt the wax
and mix the stuff in it. Another few minutes with a ladle
and some jars. You could probably package a dozen jars in
less than 1/2 hour. For people you really like, an
inexpensive wooden board completes the ensemble. For people
you really like naked, give them the "kit."

Here's the entire "kit" I included with each hand-made board:
1) two pads of 000 steel wool
2) a jar of the wax
3) a 16-ounce spray bottle of hydrogen peroxide
4) a 16-ounce spray bottle of white vinegar
5) a 16-ounce spray bottle of soy oil
6) four non-woven cloths for waxing and oiling

Steel wool for touching up scratches. The wax for sealing
the surface and filling any small spaces. The peroxide and
vinegar to use in sanitizing the boards (spray them from
separate bottles onto the surface, let it sit for a couple
minutes, wipe with a paper towel. Sterile. Works on plastic,
as well.). Soy oil for more frequent use than the wax, just
to protect the wood a bit. The cloths because I liked them,
and because they provided a nice look to the package. I used
an oversized zipper bag with everything arranged nicely.

Pastorio


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