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Old 24-11-2006, 03:37 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)

I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent, but
I wanted to try something different this year. The results were superior
to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

Since I only roast a turkey breast, I also bought a package of turkey
wings. Yesterday I popped them into a roasting pan with a couple each of
carrots, stalks of celery, a medium onion coarsely chopped (with the skin),
and a couple of cloves of garlic. Tossed in a tablespoon or so of oil and
a bit of salt. Roasted this mixture until everything was nicely browned.

Removed roasting pan to the stovetop, added 4 cups chicken broth, a
teaspoon of whole peppercorns, 5 whole allspice berries, a bay leaf, a
handful of fresh parsley, and a teaspoon of poultry seasoning. Brought
this to a boil, then reduced to a simmer for about 45 minutes. Removed
from the heat, then strained through doubled cheesecloth. Cooled and
refrigerated overnight.

This morning I removed the solidified fat and allowed the stock to warm to
room temperature.

Meanwhile, I browned 3/4 cup all-purpose flour in a dry pan in a 375 oven
until it was golden tan, then set aside.

When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and browned
bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it. I mixed the
two quantities of fat, then measured out about 1/2 cup.

Measured out 2 cups of the pan juices, adding back the measured fat, then
added 2 cups of the previously prepared stock. Brought this mixture to a
slow boil.

Meanwhile, put the remaining 2 cups of stock in the blender and added the
browned flour. Whirled this together on lowest speed until completely
smooth.

Added the stock/flour mixture in a steady stream to the simmering pot while
whisking constantly, then returned to a boil while whisking until it
thickened. Reduced heat to a bare simmer and cooked, covered, for another
half hour. Then put on the warming burner.

This was the smoothest, most flavorful gravy I've ever tasted. It may
sound like a lot of work, but it really wasn't, since the effort was spaced
out.

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.


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Old 24-11-2006, 04:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)

Oh pshaw, on Thu 23 Nov 2006 10:15:49p, Bronwyn meant to say...


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent,
but I wanted to try something different this year. The results were
superior to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

[snip]
--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.



Your're way too good Wayne! What a good job. Hope your TDay and
festivities are everything you wish for.

Cheers
Bronwyn


Why thanks, Bronwyn! Coming from you, I consider that a huge compliment!

We had a lovely and very relaxing day. This was our last holiday meal in
this house, as we are moving in December, sometime just short of Christmas.
I'm looking forward to a new and larger kitchen.

Have you planned your Christmas meal yet? I'm always curious, since our
climates/seasons are topsy turvy.

Warm regards,

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.

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Old 24-11-2006, 05:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent, but
I wanted to try something different this year. The results were superior
to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

[snip]
--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.



Your're way too good Wayne! What a good job. Hope your TDay and
festivities are everything you wish for.

Cheers
Bronwyn

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Old 24-11-2006, 07:18 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
Oh pshaw, on Thu 23 Nov 2006 10:15:49p, Bronwyn meant to say...


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent,
but I wanted to try something different this year. The results were
superior to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

[snip]
--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.



Your're way too good Wayne! What a good job. Hope your TDay and
festivities are everything you wish for.

Cheers
Bronwyn


Why thanks, Bronwyn! Coming from you, I consider that a huge compliment!

We had a lovely and very relaxing day. This was our last holiday meal in
this house, as we are moving in December, sometime just short of Christmas.
I'm looking forward to a new and larger kitchen.

Have you planned your Christmas meal yet? I'm always curious, since our
climates/seasons are topsy turvy.

Warm regards,

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.



A new kitchen - now that's something to look forward to!

Last Xmas you might recall we spent the week on an island off South
Australia with DH and my twin with great seafood on the menu.
This year, still the three of us (I/m thinking of putting mirrors
around the room to get the numbers up to 6!!!) Altho' my DH would
protest-eth that 4 of me would be way too many!
Seriously, I'm hoping our doctor and his wife will join us if they are
in town.

It will be here this year - should hot and humid no doubt. Thinking
seafood - maybe a whole large fish like snapper oven roasted in the
Webber....
My pecan plum pudding is world reknown (well, family known) but you
need a bigger crowd. Maybe a lovely cheesecake made from scratch...
Years and years ago I had a couple of Xmas in US (D.C. or Fairfax Va)
and 2 in Niagara, Ont) visiting friends. I would dearly love to have a
Thanksgiving in the US - maybe in 2007 - as I've pencilled in a Houston
visit in early Nov for a quilt convention. Then I'll call you all in
for an invite to TD LOL.
....have to go, will continue...
Bronwyn

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Old 24-11-2006, 09:20 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
-L. -L. is offline
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
snip


This was the smoothest, most flavorful gravy I've ever tasted. It may
sound like a lot of work, but it really wasn't, since the effort was spaced
out.

--
Wayne Boatwright


Sounds delicious! I would never have thought to use allspice in turkey
gravy - I will bet it gives it a nice edge. I make lkiller gravy but
it's pretty boring in comparison! I crock pot necks overnight, and
cook down the broth from those to use as the base - the necks impart
lots of gelatin and flavor. It's fairly low in fat so I add butter to
get the fat content up.

-L.



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Old 24-11-2006, 10:51 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)


Michael "Dog3" Lonergan wrote:
Never thought of using the crockpot overnight. Hmmm... I usually cook the
giblets the night before and finish it off the next day. Thanks for the
suggestion.


It generates a ton of useful meat for dressing and gravy as well. Plus
if you cook it without onion or onion powder, the kitties and/or
doggies get a real treat, too. I just threw in 7 large necks and
about a cup of water, with a touch of garlic powder. The necks
generated the rest of the broth.


My biggest regret this year is no turkey carcass to make broth with. Day
after Thanksgiving I always used to make broth. There was almost always
enough bones, meat etc. to make a decent broth. It's not a full flavored
stock but good enough for soups. The house smelled terrific.


Yes - I generally utilize all of the carcass that I can, as well.
Turkey is great in that regard.

-L.

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Old 24-11-2006, 01:49 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent, but
I wanted to try something different this year. The results were superior
to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and browned
bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it. I mixed the
two quantities of fat, then measured out about 1/2 cup.


You lost me. What two quantities of fat? Did you save fat from the
chilled stock?

Measured out 2 cups of the pan juices, adding back the measured fat, then
added 2 cups of the previously prepared stock. Brought this mixture to a
slow boil.


And you got 2 cups of pan juices from your turkey breast? I only got
3/4 cup
of everything from a 13 lb. turkey and that included the runoff from 3
bastings
with a pomegranite sauce.

Please clarify. Thanks.

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Old 24-11-2006, 02:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)

stark wrote:
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent, but
I wanted to try something different this year. The results were superior
to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and browned
bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it. I mixed the
two quantities of fat, then measured out about 1/2 cup.


You lost me. What two quantities of fat? Did you save fat from the
chilled stock?
Measured out 2 cups of the pan juices, adding back the measured fat, then
added 2 cups of the previously prepared stock. Brought this mixture to a
slow boil.


And you got 2 cups of pan juices from your turkey breast? I only got
3/4 cup
of everything from a 13 lb. turkey and that included the runoff from 3
bastings
with a pomegranite sauce.

Please clarify. Thanks.

Well, Wayne said:...

"This morning I removed the solidified fat and allowed the stock to warm
to room temperature."

I took this to mean the first lot of fat.

Then Wayne said:

"When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and
browned bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it..."

I took that to mean the 2nd lot of fat.

However, maybe I am wrong

--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy
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Old 24-11-2006, 02:30 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)

On 24 Nov 2006 05:37:42 +0200, Wayne Boatwright
wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com wrote:

I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent, but
I wanted to try something different this year. The results were superior
to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

Since I only roast a turkey breast, I also bought a package of turkey
wings. Yesterday I popped them into a roasting pan with a couple each of
carrots, stalks of celery, a medium onion coarsely chopped (with the skin),
and a couple of cloves of garlic. Tossed in a tablespoon or so of oil and
a bit of salt. Roasted this mixture until everything was nicely browned.

Removed roasting pan to the stovetop, added 4 cups chicken broth, a
teaspoon of whole peppercorns, 5 whole allspice berries, a bay leaf, a
handful of fresh parsley, and a teaspoon of poultry seasoning. Brought
this to a boil, then reduced to a simmer for about 45 minutes. Removed
from the heat, then strained through doubled cheesecloth. Cooled and
refrigerated overnight.

This morning I removed the solidified fat and allowed the stock to warm to
room temperature.

Meanwhile, I browned 3/4 cup all-purpose flour in a dry pan in a 375 oven
until it was golden tan, then set aside.

When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and browned
bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it. I mixed the
two quantities of fat, then measured out about 1/2 cup.

Measured out 2 cups of the pan juices, adding back the measured fat, then
added 2 cups of the previously prepared stock. Brought this mixture to a
slow boil.

Meanwhile, put the remaining 2 cups of stock in the blender and added the
browned flour. Whirled this together on lowest speed until completely
smooth.

Added the stock/flour mixture in a steady stream to the simmering pot while
whisking constantly, then returned to a boil while whisking until it
thickened. Reduced heat to a bare simmer and cooked, covered, for another
half hour. Then put on the warming burner.

This was the smoothest, most flavorful gravy I've ever tasted. It may
sound like a lot of work, but it really wasn't, since the effort was spaced
out.



Add a quarter cup (or so) of high quality strong coffee and you would
have gotten it perfect.
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Old 24-11-2006, 04:09 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)

On Fri, 24 Nov 2006 09:30:19 GMT, "Michael \"Dog3\" Lonergan"
wrote:

There was almost always
enough bones, meat etc. to make a decent broth. It's not a full flavored
stock but good enough for soups.


Next time roast those bones (pick the meat off first) along with the
vegetables. It will be much more full flavored. Maybe you can find a
package of wings or necks and make broth anyway.

--
See return address to reply by email


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Old 24-11-2006, 04:22 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)


Chatty Cathy wrote:
stark wrote:
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent, but
I wanted to try something different this year. The results were superior
to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and browned
bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it. I mixed the
two quantities of fat, then measured out about 1/2 cup.


You lost me. What two quantities of fat? Did you save fat from the
chilled stock?
Measured out 2 cups of the pan juices, adding back the measured fat, then
added 2 cups of the previously prepared stock. Brought this mixture to a
slow boil.


And you got 2 cups of pan juices from your turkey breast? I only got
3/4 cup
of everything from a 13 lb. turkey and that included the runoff from 3
bastings
with a pomegranite sauce.

Please clarify. Thanks.

Well, Wayne said:...

"This morning I removed the solidified fat and allowed the stock to warm
to room temperature."

I took this to mean the first lot of fat.

Then Wayne said:

"When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and
browned bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it..."

I took that to mean the 2nd lot of fat.

However, maybe I am wrong


I use a "V" rack to support the bird so this year I poured 6 cups of
water into the pan, with the giblets and neck (no liver), a carrot, a
couple stalks of celery, and a clove of garlic. This year I had a
rather smallish bird (13lbs) so roasted for almost 5 hours. After
separating the fat I ended up with a full quart of perfect gravy, very
rich... didn't bother to thicken as I like thin gravy, kinda turkey au
jus. As an added benefit the pan and rack were much easier to clean
than usual.

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Old 24-11-2006, 04:24 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)

Oh pshaw, on Fri 24 Nov 2006 06:49:18a, stark meant to say...


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent,
but I wanted to try something different this year. The results were
superior to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and
browned bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it.
I mixed the two quantities of fat, then measured out about 1/2 cup.


You lost me. What two quantities of fat? Did you save fat from the
chilled stock?


Yes, from the stock which was chilled overnight. I removed the fat
afterwards.

Measured out 2 cups of the pan juices, adding back the measured fat,
then added 2 cups of the previously prepared stock. Brought this
mixture to a slow boil.


And you got 2 cups of pan juices from your turkey breast? I only got
3/4 cup
of everything from a 13 lb. turkey and that included the runoff from 3
bastings
with a pomegranite sauce.

Please clarify. Thanks.


I roast a turkey breast on a bed of celery, carrots, and onions, and I use
a roasting bag. The combination of vegetables giving off juices and bag
preventing excess evaporation yields more juice at the end.

Pomegranite sauce, huh. Sounds delicious!

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.

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Old 24-11-2006, 04:25 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)

Oh pshaw, on Fri 24 Nov 2006 07:25:28a, Chatty Cathy meant to say...

stark wrote:
Wayne Boatwright wrote:
I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say
excellent, but I wanted to try something different this year. The
results were superior to anything I've made in the past. This is what
I did...

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and
browned bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it.
I mixed the two quantities of fat, then measured out about 1/2 cup.


You lost me. What two quantities of fat? Did you save fat from the
chilled stock?
Measured out 2 cups of the pan juices, adding back the measured fat,
then added 2 cups of the previously prepared stock. Brought this
mixture to a slow boil.


And you got 2 cups of pan juices from your turkey breast? I only got
3/4 cup
of everything from a 13 lb. turkey and that included the runoff from 3
bastings with a pomegranite sauce.

Please clarify. Thanks.

Well, Wayne said:...

"This morning I removed the solidified fat and allowed the stock to warm
to room temperature."

I took this to mean the first lot of fat.

Then Wayne said:

"When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and
browned bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing
it..."

I took that to mean the 2nd lot of fat.

However, maybe I am wrong


You are absolutely right, Cathy!

Cheers!

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.

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Old 24-11-2006, 04:26 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)

Oh pshaw, on Fri 24 Nov 2006 07:30:43a, Philip Adams meant to say...

On 24 Nov 2006 05:37:42 +0200, Wayne Boatwright
wayneboatwright_at_gmail.com wrote:

I've always made decent gravy, in fact most people would say excellent,
but I wanted to try something different this year. The results were
superior to anything I've made in the past. This is what I did...

Since I only roast a turkey breast, I also bought a package of turkey
wings. Yesterday I popped them into a roasting pan with a couple each of
carrots, stalks of celery, a medium onion coarsely chopped (with the
skin), and a couple of cloves of garlic. Tossed in a tablespoon or so
of oil and a bit of salt. Roasted this mixture until everything was
nicely browned.

Removed roasting pan to the stovetop, added 4 cups chicken broth, a
teaspoon of whole peppercorns, 5 whole allspice berries, a bay leaf, a
handful of fresh parsley, and a teaspoon of poultry seasoning. Brought
this to a boil, then reduced to a simmer for about 45 minutes. Removed
from the heat, then strained through doubled cheesecloth. Cooled and
refrigerated overnight.

This morning I removed the solidified fat and allowed the stock to warm
to room temperature.

Meanwhile, I browned 3/4 cup all-purpose flour in a dry pan in a 375
oven until it was golden tan, then set aside.

When the turkey breast was done, I drained off the pan juices and
browned bits and allowed the fat to rise to the top, then removing it.
I mixed the two quantities of fat, then measured out about 1/2 cup.

Measured out 2 cups of the pan juices, adding back the measured fat,
then added 2 cups of the previously prepared stock. Brought this
mixture to a slow boil.

Meanwhile, put the remaining 2 cups of stock in the blender and added
the browned flour. Whirled this together on lowest speed until
completely smooth.

Added the stock/flour mixture in a steady stream to the simmering pot
while whisking constantly, then returned to a boil while whisking until
it thickened. Reduced heat to a bare simmer and cooked, covered, for
another half hour. Then put on the warming burner.

This was the smoothest, most flavorful gravy I've ever tasted. It may
sound like a lot of work, but it really wasn't, since the effort was
spaced out.



Add a quarter cup (or so) of high quality strong coffee and you would
have gotten it perfect.


Hmm, never thought of that, Phillip. I've made a note to try that next
time. Thanks!

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.

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Old 24-11-2006, 04:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Turkey Gravy Revisited (long)

Oh pshaw, on Fri 24 Nov 2006 02:20:28a, -L. meant to say...


Wayne Boatwright wrote:
snip


This was the smoothest, most flavorful gravy I've ever tasted. It may
sound like a lot of work, but it really wasn't, since the effort was
spaced out.

--
Wayne Boatwright


Sounds delicious! I would never have thought to use allspice in turkey
gravy - I will bet it gives it a nice edge. I make lkiller gravy but
it's pretty boring in comparison! I crock pot necks overnight, and
cook down the broth from those to use as the base - the necks impart
lots of gelatin and flavor. It's fairly low in fat so I add butter to
get the fat content up.

-L.


Thanks, Lyn. I usually add a few allspice berries to most broths/stocks I
make, also in stews and spaghetti sauce. It's just a hint of flavor, and
doesn't stand out too much.

I've used necks before, but in a stockpot, not a crockpot. That's a good
idea. I bought wings only this time because I really didn't need a package
of both for this one occasion. If the excess went to the freezer, they'd
have hung around too long.

--
Wayne Boatwright
__________________________________________________

Useless Invention: Solar powered night light.



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