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Old 14-11-2006, 02:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Quinoa?

I just saw quinoa on the Epicurious TV show. Some sort of super grain
originally from South America.

What's the cooked consistency like? Rice, couscous?

Probably served like a pilaf or in soup in place of barley?

Sounds good, anyway.

Any thoughts?

Thanks,

Andy

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Old 14-11-2006, 03:12 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Andy wrote:
I just saw quinoa on the Epicurious TV show. Some sort of super grain
originally from South America.

What's the cooked consistency like? Rice, couscous?

Probably served like a pilaf or in soup in place of barley?

Sounds good, anyway.

Any thoughts?


No thoughts exactly..just that I've been meaning to try some eventually.
I hear it is chock full of protein and good things.

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Old 14-11-2006, 03:48 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Andy wrote:
I just saw quinoa on the Epicurious TV show. Some sort of super grain
originally from South America.

What's the cooked consistency like? Rice, couscous?

Probably served like a pilaf or in soup in place of barley?

Sounds good, anyway.

Any thoughts?



I've been cooking with it for years.


Botanically, it is an herb, but it acts like a grain when cooking so you
can think of it as a grain. Nutritionally, it has more protein and less
carb than the other grains.


The cooked consistency is closest to bulgar wheat than anything else.
You can cook it to the mushy stage or catch it when the kernels are
still soft but still separate.


You can put it in a soup, but I prefer it as a salad. I use in place of
cous cous and bulgur in tabouleh. That's mixing it with parsley, mint,
scallions, oil and lemon juice. (I have nothing against cous cous or
bulgur so my substitution is about variety, but this is a good tip for
those who can't eat wheat.)


I make another salad with half cooked quinoa and half raw finely chopped
vegetables: carrot, red and green bell pepper, scallions, cilantro or
parsley, zucchini, etc. with a cider vinegar, tamari, sesame oil dressing.


I get best results when I rinse it in a strainer before cooking. Bring
3 parts water to a boil, add 1 part quinoa, cover and lower heat for 15
minutes. Remove from heat and fluff with a fork.


Pronounce it keen-wa.


--Lia

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Old 14-11-2006, 03:57 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 08:55:35 -0600, Andy q wrote:

I just saw quinoa on the Epicurious TV show. Some sort of super grain
originally from South America.

What's the cooked consistency like? Rice, couscous?

Probably served like a pilaf or in soup in place of barley?

Sounds good, anyway.

Any thoughts?


I use it to make pilaf. Very good, and as with rice pilaf, utterly
versatile. Also very high in protein.

Try it, you'll like it :-)

TammyM
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Old 14-11-2006, 03:58 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Quinoa?

On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 08:55:35 -0600, Andy q wrote:

I just saw quinoa on the Epicurious TV show. Some sort of super grain
originally from South America.

What's the cooked consistency like? Rice, couscous?


About half way between the two.

Probably served like a pilaf or in soup in place of barley?


I've never tried it in either.

Sounds good, anyway.


It's quite pleasant.

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Old 14-11-2006, 05:28 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Julia Altshuler said...

good stuff snipped for brevity

I make another salad with half cooked quinoa and half raw finely
chopped vegetables: carrot, red and green bell pepper, scallions,
cilantro or parsley, zucchini, etc. with a cider vinegar, tamari,
sesame oil dressing.


This sounds great, that and with some improvising!


Pronounce it keen-wa.



And that's how I typed it into google and it gracefully corrected me.


--Lia



--Lia,

Thanks for the good info. The other benefits were gluten-free and high
fiber.

All the best,

Andy

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Old 14-11-2006, 05:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Andy wrote:

Thanks for the good info. The other benefits were gluten-free and high
fiber.



I'm not sure about the high fiber. In macrobiotic terms, quinoa is
strongly yang, meaning, more likely to cause constipation unless it is
offset with foods that are strongly yin.


--Lia

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Old 14-11-2006, 06:05 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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TammyM wrote:

I use it to make pilaf. Very good, and as with rice pilaf, utterly
versatile. Also very high in protein.

I've never warmed up to pilaf -- got a farorite recipe?

...fred

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Old 14-11-2006, 06:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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"Andy" q schreef in bericht ...
I just saw quinoa on the Epicurious TV show. Some sort of super grain
originally from South America.

What's the cooked consistency like? Rice, couscous?

Probably served like a pilaf or in soup in place of barley?

Sounds good, anyway.

Any thoughts?

Thanks,


Ohters have said good things in this thread. I'd just like to add that I
find it tastes a little sweet - I am sure it would go great with nuts (pilav
style), or mushrooms and feta cheese.

I ususally eat it "like"rice or bulgur. I often serve it with a veggie stew.

It's eay to cook and very good for you. Apparently, it's the only plant food
that contains all 20 amino acids, making it very suitable for peope who
don't eat animal proteins.


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Old 14-11-2006, 07:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Quinoa?

On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 08:55:35 -0600, Andy q wrote:

I just saw quinoa on the Epicurious TV show. Some sort of super grain
originally from South America.

What's the cooked consistency like? Rice, couscous?


Closer to couscous


Probably served like a pilaf or in soup in place of barley?


This is my favorite quinoa recipe, even if a bowl of it did attack me,
requiring me to get stitches in my hand:

http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/2006/07...noa-salad.html

Serene
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Old 14-11-2006, 08:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Quinoa?

Serene said...

On Tue, 14 Nov 2006 08:55:35 -0600, Andy q wrote:

I just saw quinoa on the Epicurious TV show. Some sort of super grain
originally from South America.

What's the cooked consistency like? Rice, couscous?


Closer to couscous


Probably served like a pilaf or in soup in place of barley?


This is my favorite quinoa recipe, even if a bowl of it did attack me,
requiring me to get stitches in my hand:

http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/2006/07...noa-salad.html

Serene



Serene,

I bookmarked your recipe page. A very tasty looking dish!

Thanks and all the best,

Andy
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Old 15-11-2006, 03:56 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Quinoa?

Andy wrote:
I just saw quinoa on the Epicurious TV show. Some sort of super grain
originally from South America.

What's the cooked consistency like? Rice, couscous?

Probably served like a pilaf or in soup in place of barley?

Sounds good, anyway.

Any thoughts?

Thanks,

Andy


I cook mine in my rice cooker with a 2:1 water to quinoa ratio. Comes out a
little like fluffy couscous and I use it in place of couscous in a lot of
things.

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