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Old 12-10-2006, 06:47 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown

I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .

TIA
JaKe
Seattle


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Old 12-10-2006, 07:43 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown


wrote:
denise~* wrote:
wrote:
I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .

TIA
JaKe
Seattle


I just actually looked this up for donuts, although not sure how well
it dries for biscotti. might be soft set

http://allrecipes.com/recipe/satiny-...ze/detail.aspx

you could probably nuke the chips...if you are careful.


I did nuke the chips. Someone else said corn syrup could help as well
- anyone?

JaKe


I meant nuke instead of using a double boiler, per the recipe I posted.

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Old 12-10-2006, 07:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown


wrote

I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .


For some reason I thought keeping it shiny was
why you were supposed to temper chocolate. Look
for that, I think it's your answer.

nancy




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Old 12-10-2006, 08:15 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown


Dawn wrote:
wrote:

I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .


Melting and Tempering Chocolate

"Whether you intend to coat a food item in chocolate or to mold
chocolate into a particular shape (like a lollipop or an Easter bunny)
you need to know how to melt and temper chocolate. Tempering chocolate
causes the particles in chocolate to be distributed and suspended evenly
throughout the final chocolate product, rather than clumping or
clotting. Correctly tempered chocolate will yield a bright, crisp, and
shiny chocolate, while incorrectly tempered chocolate will produce a
chocolate that is streaky and dull."

http://allrecipes.com/howto/melting-...te/detail.aspx


Dawn


Ahhhh - read the fine print! Thanks.

JaKe

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Old 12-10-2006, 08:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown

writes:
I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .


corn syrup



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Old 12-10-2006, 08:41 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Keeping chocolate shiny - brown

wrote:
I like to melt semi-sweet chocolate chips and dip my biscotti in it.
But after the chocolate dries - the chocolate looks pasty white -
almost chalky. What can I add to the chocolate to keep shiny after it
dries? Someone mentioned cream . . .


If you add cream you will be making a ganache (not 100% sure of that
spelling), which is fine, but if you just want a chocolate coating
then you have to either stop breaking the temper on your chocolate
or retemper it after melting.

If you melt the chocolate slowly (like 10 second bursts) in
the microwave and stir a lot between heating, you can melt it
without breaking temper. It's a pretty narrow temperature
range, but it can be done. You want to stay under 90F degrees.
You should have melt around 85F. Depending on the exact
chocolate you are using temper will break somewhere around
92F to 95F.

Making a ganache is OK, too. You control the hardness of
the set there by changing the ratio of chocolate to cream.
More cream means softer, less cream means firmer, but it
will never have that tempered chocolate snap.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.


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