General Cooking (rec.food.cooking) For general food and cooking discussion. Foods of all kinds, food procurement, cooking methods and techniques, eating, etc.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 05:27 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 5,762
Default Turkey brining bag

Just read the latest issue of Cook's Illustrated. Turkey day is coming,
and we'll have the usual brining in garbage bag thing coming up.
I'm in the 'garbage bags are not food grade ... or manufactured in a
food sterile environment' camp.

This was an interesting recommendation I could get behind. I've
seen the ads ... those Zip Lock bags for storing large items ... like
pillows and stuff. The magazine says they are food grade ... and
I believe it, I doubt they built a new factory to make the larger bags
separately from the food ones.

Ziplock XL bags, around $6 for 4 of them.

nancy



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 05:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,311
Default Turkey brining bag

One time on Usenet, Steve Wertz said:
On Mon, 2 Oct 2006 12:27:16 -0400, Nancy Young wrote:

Just read the latest issue of Cook's Illustrated. Turkey day is coming,
and we'll have the usual brining in garbage bag thing coming up.
I'm in the 'garbage bags are not food grade ... or manufactured in a
food sterile environment' camp.

This was an interesting recommendation I could get behind. I've
seen the ads ... those Zip Lock bags for storing large items ... like
pillows and stuff. The magazine says they are food grade ... and
I believe it, I doubt they built a new factory to make the larger bags
separately from the food ones.


The problem with plastic bags is that it's nearly impossible to
get the bird evenly covered with brine. Sure you can flip the
around every few hours, but the two times I've tried that I still
ended up with a very unevenly brined bird.


I was envisioning lining a big cooler with the bag...


--
"Little Malice" is Jani in WA
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 06:13 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 4,555
Default Turkey brining bag

Nancy Young wrote:
Just read the latest issue of Cook's Illustrated. Turkey day is coming,
and we'll have the usual brining in garbage bag thing coming up.
I'm in the 'garbage bags are not food grade ... or manufactured in a
food sterile environment' camp.

This was an interesting recommendation I could get behind. I've
seen the ads ... those Zip Lock bags for storing large items ... like
pillows and stuff. The magazine says they are food grade ... and
I believe it, I doubt they built a new factory to make the larger bags
separately from the food ones.

Ziplock XL bags, around $6 for 4 of them.

nancy



All the turkeys that I buy are already kind of salty. I assume they are
tumbled in a sodium phosphate and MSG solution, or something like that.
("Deep basted", perhaps) I can't imagine brining one. The meat is
really good, but all that salt ruins the gravy if I'm not careful.

I buy really cheap frozen turkeys year round, usually about 69¢ per
pound. None of the stores here use them as loss-leaders for the
holidays. :-( I remember buying Butterball turkeys for 19¢ per pound
at Kroger or HEB for THanksgiving in Houston...

Bob
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 06:17 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 5,762
Default Turkey brining bag


"Little Malice" wrote

One time on Usenet, Steve Wertz said:
On Mon, 2 Oct 2006 12:27:16 -0400, Nancy Young wrote:

Just read the latest issue of Cook's Illustrated. Turkey day is
coming,
and we'll have the usual brining in garbage bag thing coming up.
I'm in the 'garbage bags are not food grade ... or manufactured in a
food sterile environment' camp.

This was an interesting recommendation I could get behind. I've
seen the ads ... those Zip Lock bags for storing large items ... like
pillows and stuff. The magazine says they are food grade ... and
I believe it, I doubt they built a new factory to make the larger bags
separately from the food ones.


The problem with plastic bags is that it's nearly impossible to
get the bird evenly covered with brine. Sure you can flip the
around every few hours, but the two times I've tried that I still
ended up with a very unevenly brined bird.


I was envisioning lining a big cooler with the bag...


That was my thought, along with squeezing out most of the air
you could keep the turkey submerged without the turning.

nancy




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 06:18 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 5,762
Default Turkey brining bag


"OmManiPadmeOmelet" wrote

On Mon, 2 Oct 2006 12:27:16 -0400, Nancy Young wrote:

Just read the latest issue of Cook's Illustrated. Turkey day is
coming,
and we'll have the usual brining in garbage bag thing coming up.
I'm in the 'garbage bags are not food grade ... or manufactured in a
food sterile environment' camp.


I know that some people come down on trash bags, but I've talked to
people that say they work. Granted, I've never tried one, but
still.......


Of course they work, no one said they didn't. It's just that
they are not manufactured in a sterile environment, and the plastic
is not rated food grade. That was the point.

nancy


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 07:16 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,446
Default Turkey brining bag


"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 2 Oct 2006 12:27:16 -0400, Nancy Young wrote:

Just read the latest issue of Cook's Illustrated. Turkey day is coming,
and we'll have the usual brining in garbage bag thing coming up.
I'm in the 'garbage bags are not food grade ... or manufactured in a
food sterile environment' camp.

This was an interesting recommendation I could get behind. I've
seen the ads ... those Zip Lock bags for storing large items ... like
pillows and stuff. The magazine says they are food grade ... and
I believe it, I doubt they built a new factory to make the larger bags
separately from the food ones.


The problem with plastic bags is that it's nearly impossible to
get the bird evenly covered with brine. Sure you can flip the
around every few hours, but the two times I've tried that I still
ended up with a very unevenly brined bird.

-sw


Easy,

Take a large cooler and fill several 1/2 gallon jugs (apple juice etc) with
water. Then line the cooler with the bag and the bird. Add cooled brining
solution and burp out as much air as possible. Secure with 1 or more twist
tie's. Fill the cooler to the top with ice. (note if you have freezer room
fill the jugs 90% and freeze uncapped).

Dimitri


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 07:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,311
Default Turkey brining bag

One time on Usenet, "Dimitri" said:
"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...


snip

The problem with plastic bags is that it's nearly impossible to
get the bird evenly covered with brine. Sure you can flip the
around every few hours, but the two times I've tried that I still
ended up with a very unevenly brined bird.


Easy,

Take a large cooler and fill several 1/2 gallon jugs (apple juice etc) with
water. Then line the cooler with the bag and the bird. Add cooled brining
solution and burp out as much air as possible. Secure with 1 or more twist
tie's. Fill the cooler to the top with ice. (note if you have freezer room
fill the jugs 90% and freeze uncapped).


Why uncapped? I ask because I keep a bunch of those in the top of my
freezer -- we use them to help it stay cold in there, plus they make
good ice blocks for the cooler. BTW, it's nice to see you posting
again, Dimitri... :-)


--
"Little Malice" is Jani in WA
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 08:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 4,446
Default Turkey brining bag


"Little Malice" wrote in message
...
One time on Usenet, "Dimitri" said:
"Steve Wertz" wrote in message
...


Easy,


Take a large cooler and fill several 1/2 gallon jugs (apple juice etc) with
water. Then line the cooler with the bag and the bird. Add cooled brining
solution and burp out as much air as possible. Secure with 1 or more twist
tie's. Fill the cooler to the top with ice. (note if you have freezer room
fill the jugs 90% and freeze uncapped).


Why uncapped? I ask because I keep a bunch of those in the top of my
freezer -- we use them to help it stay cold in there, plus they make
good ice blocks for the cooler. BTW, it's nice to see you posting
again, Dimitri... :-)


--
"Little Malice" is Jani in WA
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~


Thanks, ;-)

The uncapped takes care of the expansion of the water when freezing else the
bottle can crack and break. The purpose of the bottle is to take up volume in
the cooler that would have to be filled by the brine. It makes the whole
process much easier to handle. Normally I use an apple juice for the base of
the brine ergo I have the bottles handy.

Dimitri


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 08:55 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,311
Default Turkey brining bag

One time on Usenet, "Dimitri" said:

"Little Malice" wrote in message
...
One time on Usenet, "Dimitri" said:


Take a large cooler and fill several 1/2 gallon jugs (apple juice etc) with
water. Then line the cooler with the bag and the bird. Add cooled brining
solution and burp out as much air as possible. Secure with 1 or more twist
tie's. Fill the cooler to the top with ice. (note if you have freezer
room fill the jugs 90% and freeze uncapped).


Why uncapped? I ask because I keep a bunch of those in the top of my
freezer -- we use them to help it stay cold in there, plus they make
good ice blocks for the cooler. BTW, it's nice to see you posting
again, Dimitri... :-)


Thanks, ;-)

The uncapped takes care of the expansion of the water when freezing else the
bottle can crack and break. The purpose of the bottle is to take up volume in
the cooler that would have to be filled by the brine. It makes the whole
process much easier to handle. Normally I use an apple juice for the base of
the brine ergo I have the bottles handy.


Ahhh, I see now. Yeah, I'm willing to bet that some of the ones
we have in our freezer are cracked, but for what we normally use
them for (keeping the freezer cold) it's not a big deal. Obviously
it would be in this case. Thanks for the explaination... :-)


--
"Little Malice" is Jani in WA
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 09:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,215
Default Turkey brining bag

Nancy Young typed:
"OmManiPadmeOmelet" wrote

On Mon, 2 Oct 2006 12:27:16 -0400, Nancy Young wrote:

Just read the latest issue of Cook's Illustrated. Turkey day is
coming,
and we'll have the usual brining in garbage bag thing coming up.
I'm in the 'garbage bags are not food grade ... or manufactured
in a
food sterile environment' camp.


I know that some people come down on trash bags, but I've talked to
people that say they work. Granted, I've never tried one, but
still.......


Of course they work, no one said they didn't. It's just that
they are not manufactured in a sterile environment, and the plastic
is not rated food grade. That was the point.

nancy


Some garbage bags have deodorizers and/or air fresheners added. I
don't think *I* want to eat that.

BOB


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 10:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,861
Default Turkey brining bag

Little Malice wrote on 02 Oct 2006 in rec.food.cooking

Ahhh, I see now. Yeah, I'm willing to bet that some of the ones
we have in our freezer are cracked, but for what we normally use
them for (keeping the freezer cold) it's not a big deal. Obviously
it would be in this case. Thanks for the explaination... :-)



Like the brick in the toilet tank craze.
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-10-2006, 10:32 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 5,762
Default Turkey brining bag


" BOB" wrote

Nancy Young typed:


Of course they work, no one said they didn't. It's just that
they are not manufactured in a sterile environment, and the plastic
is not rated food grade. That was the point.


Some garbage bags have deodorizers and/or air fresheners added. I don't
think *I* want to eat that.


Yum! Add talcom powder to that and I'm set.

nancy


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-10-2006, 12:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 7,545
Default Turkey brining bag

In article ,
jay wrote:


I bought a white Carlisle food grade container at the local restaurant
supply for about 8$ to brine in. It is sturdy and could last forever.
It's perfect if you have the refrigeration space. I have learned that if
you want folks to brag about the turkey.. brine it.


Fridge space is a problem for most people. Per a newspaper recipe, we
used a cooler and a bag of ice from the store to brine our turkey.

--
Dan Abel

Petaluma, California, USA
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 03-10-2006, 02:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,215
Default Turkey brining bag

In ,
Steve Wertz typed:
On Mon, 2 Oct 2006 16:51:11 -0400, BOB wrote:

Some garbage bags have deodorizers and/or air fresheners added. I
don't think *I* want to eat that.


Think of it as breath freshener. For your whole body.

-sw


'-)

BOB




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brining Turkey Walter Mitty Barbecue 5 21-11-2009 02:19 AM
Dry-brining turkey Dora General Cooking 1 20-11-2009 09:19 PM
Salting not Brining Your Turkey THE TOPANGA FOOD COACH AND CHEF General Cooking 3 22-11-2006 08:50 PM
Brining a turkey rip General Cooking 2 05-11-2005 11:49 PM
Brining a kosher turkey Peter Aitken General Cooking 17 24-11-2003 01:52 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 05:57 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017