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Old 28-09-2006, 02:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)

This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be subsituting
for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as well.
This isn't a recipe that can be messed with. IF you feel like being
creative, it will have be done with the finishing of the cookies. Examples:
different shapes, candies, nuts, flavoured icing, etc...

Scotch Cookies

1/2 cup corn starch

1/2 cup icing sugar

1 cup all-purpose flour

3/4 cup butter (softened)

Sift together corn starch, icing sugar and flour with large spoon (NOT
METAL) thoroughly blend in butter . Work with hands until soft smooth dough
forms, if necessary refrigerate 1 hour or until easy to handle. Shape in 1
inch balls. Place about 1 1/2 inches apart on ungreased baking sheet flatten
with lightly floured fork or roll dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into
shapes with cookie cutters. Decorate with candied cherries, coloured
sprinkles or nuts if desired. Bake 300 F. for 15 to 20 minutes or until
edges are lightly browned. Time will vary with size of cookies.



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Old 28-09-2006, 03:11 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)


"Carla Gilliss" wrote

This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be subsituting
for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as
well. This isn't a recipe that can be messed with. IF you feel like being
creative, it will have be done with the finishing of the cookies.
Examples: different shapes, candies, nuts, flavoured icing, etc...


Thanks for the recipe. I'm making these.

nancy


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Old 28-09-2006, 05:01 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)

In article ,
"Carla Gilliss" wrote:

This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be subsituting
for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as well.



Scotch Cookies



Point of order, here, Carla. Scotch is booze. The people and things of
Scotland are Scottish. "-)

Why the cornstarch, do you know? Most of the shortbread recipes I've
looked at are just flour, sugar, and butter, maybe some flavoring. I
found a shortbread recipe from Glasgow that includes cornflour, but only
a small amount in proportion to the sugar, flour, and butter.

Anyone know what the purpose of the cornstarch is?
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller
http://jamlady.eboard.com
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Old 28-09-2006, 05:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)

One time on Usenet, Melba's Jammin' said:
In article ,
"Carla Gilliss" wrote:


This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be subsituting
for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as well.




Scotch Cookies



Point of order, here, Carla. Scotch is booze. The people and things of
Scotland are Scottish. "-)

Why the cornstarch, do you know? Most of the shortbread recipes I've
looked at are just flour, sugar, and butter, maybe some flavoring. I
found a shortbread recipe from Glasgow that includes cornflour, but only
a small amount in proportion to the sugar, flour, and butter.

Anyone know what the purpose of the cornstarch is?


Not I -- AAMOF, I had the same question, but didn't want to offend
the OP by mentioning it. (People who post how long they've been making
something sometimes take such queries as a challenge to their family
honor.) I should have known you'd not only have the chutzpah to ask,
but also be able to do so tactfully...

--
"Little Malice" is Jani in WA
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
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Old 28-09-2006, 05:39 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)

Little Malice wrote:

One time on Usenet, Melba's Jammin' said:

In article ,
"Carla Gilliss" wrote:




This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be subsituting
for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as well.





Scotch Cookies



Point of order, here, Carla. Scotch is booze. The people and things of
Scotland are Scottish. "-)

Why the cornstarch, do you know? Most of the shortbread recipes I've
looked at are just flour, sugar, and butter, maybe some flavoring. I
found a shortbread recipe from Glasgow that includes cornflour, but only
a small amount in proportion to the sugar, flour, and butter.

Anyone know what the purpose of the cornstarch is?



Not I -- AAMOF, I had the same question, but didn't want to offend
the OP by mentioning it. (People who post how long they've been making
something sometimes take such queries as a challenge to their family
honor.) I should have known you'd not only have the chutzpah to ask,
but also be able to do so tactfully...


Add me to the "Idunno" list but I can tell you that most of the
shortbread recipes I've made contained cornstarch. I suspect it
contributes to the velvety, melt-in-your-mouth feel of the finished cookies.

Kathleen



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Old 28-09-2006, 10:31 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)

In article ,
Kathleen wrote:

Little Malice wrote:

One time on Usenet, Melba's Jammin' said:

In article ,
"Carla Gilliss" wrote:




This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be subsituting
for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as
well.




Scotch Cookies


Point of order, here, Carla. Scotch is booze. The people and things of
Scotland are Scottish. "-)

Why the cornstarch, do you know? Most of the shortbread recipes I've
looked at are just flour, sugar, and butter, maybe some flavoring. I
found a shortbread recipe from Glasgow that includes cornflour, but only
a small amount in proportion to the sugar, flour, and butter.

Anyone know what the purpose of the cornstarch is?



Not I -- AAMOF, I had the same question, but didn't want to offend
the OP by mentioning it. (People who post how long they've been making
something sometimes take such queries as a challenge to their family
honor.) I should have known you'd not only have the chutzpah to ask,
but also be able to do so tactfully...


Add me to the "Idunno" list but I can tell you that most of the
shortbread recipes I've made contained cornstarch. I suspect it
contributes to the velvety, melt-in-your-mouth feel of the finished cookies.

Kathleen


Huh. Maybe I've been missing that because I don't especially like
shortbread -- I think it leaves the MOST Alexawful taste in the mouth
after eating.
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller
http://jamlady.eboard.com
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Old 28-09-2006, 10:46 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)

One time on Usenet, Melba's Jammin' said:
In article ,
Kathleen wrote:
Little Malice wrote:
One time on Usenet, Melba's Jammin' said:
In article ,
"Carla Gilliss" wrote:


This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be
subsituting for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as
well.

Scotch Cookies

Point of order, here, Carla. Scotch is booze. The people and things of
Scotland are Scottish. "-)

Why the cornstarch, do you know? Most of the shortbread recipes I've
looked at are just flour, sugar, and butter, maybe some flavoring. I
found a shortbread recipe from Glasgow that includes cornflour, but only
a small amount in proportion to the sugar, flour, and butter.

Anyone know what the purpose of the cornstarch is?


Not I -- AAMOF, I had the same question, but didn't want to offend
the OP by mentioning it. (People who post how long they've been making
something sometimes take such queries as a challenge to their family
honor.) I should have known you'd not only have the chutzpah to ask,
but also be able to do so tactfully...


Add me to the "Idunno" list but I can tell you that most of the
shortbread recipes I've made contained cornstarch. I suspect it
contributes to the velvety, melt-in-your-mouth feel of the finished cookies.


Huh. Maybe I've been missing that because I don't especially like
shortbread -- I think it leaves the MOST Alexawful taste in the mouth
after eating.


I, OTOH, adore the stuff, especially my Mom's recipe, which I've
posted before. It doesn't have cornstarch in it. There may be
something to what Kathleen says about "why", but I'm not willing
to waste good butter, flour, and sugar trying it out... ;-)

--
"Little Malice" is Jani in WA
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
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Old 28-09-2006, 10:53 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)

Carla Gilliss wrote:
This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be subsituting
for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as well.
This isn't a recipe that can be messed with. IF you feel like being
creative, it will have be done with the finishing of the cookies. Examples:
different shapes, candies, nuts, flavoured icing, etc...

Scotch Cookies

1/2 cup corn starch

1/2 cup icing sugar

1 cup all-purpose flour

3/4 cup butter (softened)

Sift together corn starch, icing sugar and flour with large spoon (NOT
METAL) thoroughly blend in butter . Work with hands until soft smooth dough
forms, if necessary refrigerate 1 hour or until easy to handle. Shape in 1
inch balls. Place about 1 1/2 inches apart on ungreased baking sheet flatten
with lightly floured fork or roll dough to 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into
shapes with cookie cutters. Decorate with candied cherries, coloured
sprinkles or nuts if desired. Bake 300 F. for 15 to 20 minutes or until
edges are lightly browned. Time will vary with size of cookies.



Scotch Cookies!!! I cannot believe that your family are of Scots
descent, though I suppose if you live in America long enough something
gets disconnected. You have my Scots blood boiling - 30 years, forsooth,
people have been making shortbread for centuries. You could at least
make an effort to get the terminology correct.

As it happens, that is not a recipe for shortbread anyway - adding corn
starch, or corn flour as the Scots call it, results in something called
"melting moments". If you add custard powder you get "yo-yos".
*Shortbread* is not a cookie, nor a biscuit, it is just shortbread. And
Scotch is something that comes in a bottle.

Traditional shortbread may include rice flour, my mother never used it
and I don't care for it. But decorating with coloured sprinkles or icing
is an abomination.

There are two traditional shapes. You can make it in fingers, which are
called shortbread fingers. Or you can shape it into a round. it is
possible to buy wooden moulds which leave you with an embossed
decoration of a thistle or the like, but I think they're twee. You press
round the edges with a fork, prick it all over with the fork and score
the top into wedges to assist breaking up the finished product - this is
known as petticoat tails. No sprinkles or nuts.

Christine
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Old 29-09-2006, 12:07 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)


Kathleen wrote:


Add me to the "Idunno" list but I can tell you that most of the
shortbread recipes I've made contained cornstarch. I suspect it
contributes to the velvety, melt-in-your-mouth feel of the finished cookies.

Kathleen


I have recipes that use rice flour instead of cornstarch...prbably for
the reasons you suggest ...the "mouth feel" of the finished cookies.

-SD-

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Old 29-09-2006, 12:53 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)


Kathleen wrote:
Little Malice wrote:

One time on Usenet, Melba's Jammin' said:

In article ,
"Carla Gilliss" wrote:




This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be subsituting
for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as well.




Scotch Cookies


Point of order, here, Carla. Scotch is booze. The people and things of
Scotland are Scottish. "-)

Why the cornstarch, do you know? Most of the shortbread recipes I've
looked at are just flour, sugar, and butter, maybe some flavoring. I
found a shortbread recipe from Glasgow that includes cornflour, but only
a small amount in proportion to the sugar, flour, and butter.

Anyone know what the purpose of the cornstarch is?



Not I -- AAMOF, I had the same question, but didn't want to offend
the OP by mentioning it. (People who post how long they've been making
something sometimes take such queries as a challenge to their family
honor.) I should have known you'd not only have the chutzpah to ask,
but also be able to do so tactfully...


Add me to the "Idunno" list but I can tell you that most of the
shortbread recipes I've made contained cornstarch. I suspect it
contributes to the velvety, melt-in-your-mouth feel of the finished cookies.

Kathleen


Not that I want to challenge the OP on what is clearly a beloved family
recipe, but I too, was surprised by the inclusion of cornstarch, as I'm
unfamiliar with that ingredient in shortbread. (But if it works, it
works!)

I myself often use a combination of 1 3/4 cup regular flour and 1/4 cup
rice flour. It gives the cookies a very nice, crisp, delicate quality.

Alas, I don't make shortbread all that much, to cut down on butter
consumption. On this point, I absolutely agree with the OP--shortbread
HAS to be made with butter. Don't futz around and pretend you're making
diet cookies with this one. They're an indulgence, enjoy them as
such. =o)

Melissa



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Old 29-09-2006, 07:24 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)

Barb wrote:

Point of order, here, Carla. Scotch is booze. The people and things of
Scotland are Scottish. "-)


So the venerable soup known as Scotch Broth is made with booze? I had no
idea!

Bob


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Old 29-09-2006, 07:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)


Old Mother Ashby wrote:
snip petty rant

Oh Jesus! Do you ever take a shit?

-L.

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Old 29-09-2006, 08:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)


-L. wrote:
Old Mother Ashby wrote:
snip petty rant

Oh Jesus! Do you ever take a shit?

-L.


g Actually, that's just the sort of detail I think is interesting. (
But I understand those who don't.) It is annoying to hear someone say,
"I'm Scotch"--as though they were a bottle of liquor. Not important in
the great scheme of things, but it matters to some people.

Cheers, Nancree

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Old 29-09-2006, 10:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)


Cornstarch is thickning ....or is it ?

it rarely gets cooked , cause intent is to thicken .

How does it taste when cooked ?

CORNBREAD !

I love cornbread /tortillas/corn on cob .

so in 1000's of recipes , did they cornstarch it for appearance(
thick)
or flavor ? They wont or cant tell you !

Next question , what does cornstarch NOT taste good with ?
probably few exceptions .







Melba's Jammin' wrote:
In article ,
"Carla Gilliss" wrote:

This is another one of my family recipes that my family has been creating
for over 30+ years. Please note that NOTHING is allowed to be subsituting
for the butter called for in this recipe. They don't turn out half as well.



Scotch Cookies



Point of order, here, Carla. Scotch is booze. The people and things of
Scotland are Scottish. "-)

Why the cornstarch, do you know? Most of the shortbread recipes I've
looked at are just flour, sugar, and butter, maybe some flavoring. I
found a shortbread recipe from Glasgow that includes cornflour, but only
a small amount in proportion to the sugar, flour, and butter.

Anyone know what the purpose of the cornstarch is?
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
http://web.mac.com/barbschaller
http://jamlady.eboard.com


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Old 29-09-2006, 11:31 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Christmas Scotch Cookies (aka shortbread cookies)



I have also tried the scotch cookies made with out cornstarch. I think the
difference (personally, that is) is that the cookies with cornstarch seem
to almost melt in your mouth. They break apart very easily when you eat
them. I usually use an inverted shot glass (This is the only reason that I
have one I don't drink) to cut the perfect 1-1 1/2 inch circle. Just the
right size for little hands.

Carla

Why the cornstarch, do you know? Most of the shortbread recipes I've
looked at are just flour, sugar, and butter, maybe some flavoring. I
found a shortbread recipe from Glasgow that includes cornflour, but only
a small amount in proportion to the sugar, flour, and butter.

Anyone know what the purpose of the cornstarch is?
--
-Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ





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