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Old 10-09-2006, 02:00 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa


The book series "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" (Botswana)make frequent
references to pumpkins as some sort of "food of the gods". Little kids
go bonkers when they learn there is pumpkin for dinner.

What on earth sort of "pumpkin" could they be talking about?

I have made reasonable efforts to eat pumpkin but other than pie and
soup, it leaves me cold compared to sever squashes which I really love.
I find what we call pumpkin barely palatable.

On the other hand, the books are probably the best I have run into since
Dickens. I have only heard them on tape and the narrator really is
half of what makes them wonderful.

js


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Old 10-09-2006, 02:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa

Jack Schmidling wrote:

The book series "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" (Botswana)make frequent
references to pumpkins as some sort of "food of the gods". Little kids
go bonkers when they learn there is pumpkin for dinner.

What on earth sort of "pumpkin" could they be talking about?

I have made reasonable efforts to eat pumpkin but other than pie and
soup, it leaves me cold compared to sever squashes which I really love.
I find what we call pumpkin barely palatable.

On the other hand, the books are probably the best I have run into since
Dickens. I have only heard them on tape and the narrator really is half
of what makes them wonderful.

js




Aren't they fun? I have read them all and at first found it hard to
believe the author was male. He captured the emotions of the female
characters so perfectly.

I suspect strongly that the pumpkins were some variety of hard-shelled
squash. Hard to tell. I found out that the "bush tea" that the ladies
drink is available in the U.S. It is herbal, called "rooibos" tea and
in my experience it is pretty awful. I bought a package at a local
health food store where there was a choice of three or four brands of
the same herb. There's no accounting for tastes!

gloria p
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Old 10-09-2006, 02:41 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa

Jack Schmidling wrote:

The book series "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" (Botswana)make frequent
references to pumpkins as some sort of "food of the gods". Little kids
go bonkers when they learn there is pumpkin for dinner.

What on earth sort of "pumpkin" could they be talking about?

I have made reasonable efforts to eat pumpkin but other than pie and
soup, it leaves me cold compared to sever squashes which I really love.
I find what we call pumpkin barely palatable.

On the other hand, the books are probably the best I have run into since
Dickens. I have only heard them on tape and the narrator really is half
of what makes them wonderful.

js


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Old 10-09-2006, 05:50 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa

Puester wrote:
Jack Schmidling wrote:

The book series "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" (Botswana)make
frequent references to pumpkins as some sort of "food of the gods".
Little kids go bonkers when they learn there is pumpkin for dinner.

What on earth sort of "pumpkin" could they be talking about?

I have made reasonable efforts to eat pumpkin but other than pie and
soup, it leaves me cold compared to sever squashes which I really
love. I find what we call pumpkin barely palatable.

On the other hand, the books are probably the best I have run into
since Dickens. I have only heard them on tape and the narrator
really is half of what makes them wonderful.

js




Aren't they fun? I have read them all and at first found it hard to
believe the author was male. He captured the emotions of the female
characters so perfectly.

Have you read his books about Prof von Iggelfeld? Absolutely delightful!

Christine
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Old 10-09-2006, 06:09 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa


Puester wrote:


Aren't they fun? I have read them all and at first found it hard to
believe the author was male. He captured the emotions of the female
characters so perfectly.


It really is nutty but you should listen to the recorded books version.
The narrator being a lady just reinforces the idea that the author has
to be one.

I found out that the "bush tea" that the ladies
drink is available in the U.S. It is herbal, called "rooibos" tea and
in my experience it is pretty awful. I bought a package at a local
health food store where there was a choice of three or four brands of
the same herb. There's no accounting for tastes!


I think you got the wrong stuff. You want Honey Bush Tea and my wife
purchased some from Stash tea and it is very pleasant. But as it has
no caffein, I see no point in drinking it but she likes it.

Anyway, I am still trolling for info on the pumpkins. In one of the
books it says specifically that it was yellow or orange so that
eliminates the green ones.

js


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Old 10-09-2006, 07:27 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa

On Sat, 09 Sep 2006 19:00:57 -0600, Jack Schmidling
wrote:

The book series "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" (Botswana)make frequent
references to pumpkins as some sort of "food of the gods". Little kids
go bonkers when they learn there is pumpkin for dinner.

What on earth sort of "pumpkin" could they be talking about?


I have decided that people "on the other side of the pond" call every
squash "pumpkin", but mostly they are talking about butternut squash.

I have made reasonable efforts to eat pumpkin but other than pie and
soup, it leaves me cold compared to sever squashes which I really love.
I find what we call pumpkin barely palatable.

On the other hand, the books are probably the best I have run into since
Dickens. I have only heard them on tape and the narrator really is
half of what makes them wonderful.

I tried reading a "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" one time, but was
bored to tears by it. I don't like Agatha Christie either.
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Old 10-09-2006, 09:15 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
Jke Jke is offline
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Default Pumpkins in Africa


I suspect strongly that the pumpkins were some variety of hard-shelled
squash. Hard to tell. I found out that the "bush tea" that the ladies
drink is available in the U.S. It is herbal, called "rooibos" tea and in
my experience it is pretty awful. I bought a package at a local health
food store where there was a choice of three or four brands of the same
herb. There's no accounting for tastes!

At long last I discover I am not the only one who dislikes rooibos. What a
waste of taste bud space. I'd rather have even the cheapest tea bags
instead. Coming from someone who only buys loose leaf.


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Old 10-09-2006, 11:05 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa

In article ,
Jack Schmidling wrote:

The book series "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" (Botswana)make frequent
references to pumpkins as some sort of "food of the gods". Little kids
go bonkers when they learn there is pumpkin for dinner.

What on earth sort of "pumpkin" could they be talking about?

I have made reasonable efforts to eat pumpkin but other than pie and
soup, it leaves me cold compared to sever squashes which I really love.
I find what we call pumpkin barely palatable.

On the other hand, the books are probably the best I have run into since
Dickens. I have only heard them on tape and the narrator really is
half of what makes them wonderful.

js


Could be baby pumpkin. :-)
If you harvest some of the small ones, they are delicious steamed.

Like a tatuma almost, but milder.

We used to do it all the time when we accidently grew pumpkins from the
compost heap. lol

Mom introduced me to them.
--
Peace!
Om

"My mother never saw the irony in calling me a Son of a bitch"
-- Jack Nicholson
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Old 10-09-2006, 11:55 AM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa


Jack Schmidling wrote:
The book series "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" (Botswana)make frequent
references to pumpkins as some sort of "food of the gods". Little kids
go bonkers when they learn there is pumpkin for dinner.

What on earth sort of "pumpkin" could they be talking about?


The closest thing you will find in the states is the Seminole pumpkin -
a small, buff colored squash, which was grown by the "Black Seminole"
people in Florida. Florida was a refuge for freed and escaped slaves,
many interacted with and mated with the Seminole Indians of the area,
developing a multiethnic people. The pumpkins they grew were most
likely descendants of African varieties.

Here's a pic (below). Although the link says they were grown as early
as 1500's by the Seminoles, I don't think that's correct - I thnk
that's probably too early. The Africans were much better farmers than
the seminoles and grew far more varieties of food crops in Florida. I
have found a number of references which stated that the Seminoles
looked to the Africans for guidence in growing different crops.
(Seminoles kept Africans as slaves although the relationship was
nothing like the enslavement of Africans by the people of European
descent - it was much more of a mutualistic relationship and the
Africans had their own self-governing communities.)


http://www.southernexposure.com/Merc... ry_Code=PUMP

Anyway, that's as much as I know about African Pumpkins.

-L.

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Old 10-09-2006, 12:34 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa

Jke wrote:

At long last I discover I am not the only one who dislikes rooibos. What a
waste of taste bud space. I'd rather have even the cheapest tea bags
instead. Coming from someone who only buys loose leaf.


FWIW, I dislike the taste of rooibos tea intensely (even though its very
popular here with many people in South Africa). Its supposed to be "good
for you", so that's probably why

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Old 10-09-2006, 12:51 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa

sf wrote:
On Sat, 09 Sep 2006 19:00:57 -0600, Jack Schmidling
wrote:
The book series "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" (Botswana)make frequent
references to pumpkins as some sort of "food of the gods". Little kids
go bonkers when they learn there is pumpkin for dinner.

What on earth sort of "pumpkin" could they be talking about?


I have decided that people "on the other side of the pond" call every
squash "pumpkin", but mostly they are talking about butternut squash.


You might be right, sf. Butternut squash is very popular here in SA (and
Botswana is one of our immediate neighbors). I also like gem squash too.
I seldom see what I refer to as "Halloween" pumpkin here - the stuff
they label as "pumpkin" in our supermarkets does not have that
distinctive "orange" skin.

--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy
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Old 10-09-2006, 04:04 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa

On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 13:34:21 +0200, Chatty Cathy
wrote:

Jke wrote:

At long last I discover I am not the only one who dislikes rooibos. What a
waste of taste bud space. I'd rather have even the cheapest tea bags
instead. Coming from someone who only buys loose leaf.


FWIW, I dislike the taste of rooibos tea intensely (even though its very
popular here with many people in South Africa). Its supposed to be "good
for you", so that's probably why


Interesting. I really like rooibos tea - especially in the evening
because it's supposed to be caffeine-free. I find it very soothing.
Tried it iced once, once was enough! It's often called "red bush"
tea here.

TammyM
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Old 10-09-2006, 04:08 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa


sf wrote:
On Sat, 09 Sep 2006 19:00:57 -0600, Jack Schmidling
wrote:

The book series "No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" (Botswana)make frequent
references to pumpkins as some sort of "food of the gods". Little kids
go bonkers when they learn there is pumpkin for dinner.

What on earth sort of "pumpkin" could they be talking about?


I have decided that people "on the other side of the pond" call every
squash "pumpkin", but mostly they are talking about butternut squash.



Butternust squash is referred to as calabaza here in Honduras - that is
the Spanish word for pumpkin. It seems any orange fleshed, hard shelled
squash is given that title.

-SD-

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Old 10-09-2006, 07:29 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
Jke Jke is offline
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Default Pumpkins in Africa


"Chatty Cathy" schreef in bericht
...
Jke wrote:

At long last I discover I am not the only one who dislikes rooibos. What
a waste of taste bud space. I'd rather have even the cheapest tea bags
instead. Coming from someone who only buys loose leaf.


FWIW, I dislike the taste of rooibos tea intensely (even though its very
popular here with many people in South Africa). Its supposed to be "good
for you", so that's probably why

AFAIK, my friends drink it b/c it has no caffeine. That's the only health
claim I've ever heard for it.

All I can say is is it must be pretty darn healthy if it can manage to
distract people from its actual flavor


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Old 10-09-2006, 07:37 PM posted to rec.food.cooking
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Default Pumpkins in Africa

Jke wrote:


All I can say is is it must be pretty darn healthy if it can manage to
distract people from its actual flavor



Exactly! LOL.


--
Cheers
Chatty Cathy


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