Diabetic (alt.food.diabetic) This group is for the discussion of controlled-portion eating plans for the dietary management of diabetes.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-05-2005, 06:16 AM
Karen Sexton
 
Posts: n/a
Default Looking for Good Chocolate Recipes



hello,

I'm not diabetic, just controlling my sugar intake and trying to lose
weight. I lurked on some of the diet forums and they are so busy
arguing and putting each other down that I thought I'd ask over here.

What i'm looking for are some links for some good chocolate recipes-
cookies and fudge in particular. They don't have to be low-fat or low
carb, just little or no sugar.

I made some oatmeal cookies with Splenda (I like it better than other
sweeteners), and the results were ok, not good, just ok.

I Googled and I went to the Splenda site, and they have some recipes,
but they didn't really look that great. Another site had fudge made
with cocoa, Splenda and cream cheese, but a reader wrote in and said
it was awful.

There is Type II onset diabetes in my family (grandfather) - but so
far my mother (76) and uncle (93) haven't had it. I don't feel good
when I eat sugar, just sluggish, mostly.

Thanks,

karen

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-05-2005, 02:43 PM
None Given
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Karen Sexton" wrote in message
...

There is Type II onset diabetes in my family (grandfather) - but so
far my mother (76) and uncle (93) haven't had it. I don't feel good
when I eat sugar, just sluggish, mostly.


You should get a meter and test after you do that, it may tell you why you
feel that way. That feeling usually means my BG went too high. That too
high figure for me is still far below the diagnosis criteria.

If you just want to cut back the amount of sugar you could use the Splenda
or the Splenda blend in regular recipes, or even cut the blend with more
straight Splenda. I find substituting straight Splenda for sugar one to one
leaves an aftertaste so I use a little less than the recipe calls for. You
can also use Splenda mixed with another sweetener like Diabetisweet, not
sure of the spelling but it is a sugar alcohol and available in the pharmacy
section of Wal-Mart. You should also google for low carb or diabetic
recipes, that's where you will find the ones that cut down on the sugar.
There was a recipe that uses tofu on one of these groups, I don't remember
who posted it but here it is. I haven't tried it yet.

SUGAR-FREE TOFU MOUSSE

1 pound pack silken tofu
4 ounces bitter baking chocolate
1/4 - 1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
Water to dissolve the cocoa powder in (Add by tablespoonfuls.)
Artificial sweetener to taste (Start with 25 packs.)
1-2 teaspoons vanilla extract (optional but good)
1 -2 egg whites from "Just Whites," beaten stiff (but not
dry)(Optional)

Beat the tofu until all liquidy, preferably in a food processor. Mix the
cocoa powder with cold water until it is dissolved but thick (paste like,
not cocoa drink- like). Melt the baking chocolate. Add chocolate,
sweetener, cocoa and vanilla to the tofu and mix until well blended. Fold
in egg whites if using. Serve at room temperature in small portions as it
is quite overwhelming.

It keeps pretty well in the fridge for several days. It would keep longer
without the egg whites.
+++++++++++++
I got this one from the low carb show on the food network, I may try it
with almond flour instead of soy next time. I thank the soy tastes a
little flat. I didn't bother with the frosting because I've never used a
frosting on brownies.

Low Carb Double Chocolate Walnut Brownies
Yield: 25 servings

1 1/2 tablespoons wheat bran, or oat bran
1 1/4 cups plus 1/2 tablespoon soy flour
4 ounces unsweetened baking chocolate
1/2 cup unsalted butter
2 cups sugar substitute (recommended: Splenda)
1/2 cup heavy cream
5 large eggs
1 tablespoon no sugar added vanilla extract
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
Low Carb Chocolate Frosting, recipe follows

Special Equipment: 8-inch square baking pan

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Spray pan with nonstick vegetable oil cooking spray.
Set aside. Mix wheat bran and 1/2 tablespoon soy flour
together and sprinkle evenly over the inside of the
greased pan, also coating the sides.

Place the unsweetened chocolate and butter in a steel
bowl and melt over a saucepan of simmering water. Whisk
in 1 cup sugar substitute and 1/4 cup heavy cream. Once
thoroughly blended, turn off heat and keep warm until
needed.

With an electric mixer on high, beat the eggs, 1 cup
sugar substitute and the vanilla extract just until
blended. Reduce to low speed and then blend in the
chocolate mixture.

With a wooden spoon, mix in the baking powder,
1 1/4 cups soy flour, walnuts, and 1/4 cup heavy cream.
Spread evenly into the prepared pan and bake on the
center rack for 35 to 40 minutes, or until a toothpick
inserted in the center comes out clean. (Do not over-
bake or brownies will be dry and hard.) Cool completely
before frosting with low carb chocolate frosting. Cut
into 5 rows by 5 rows to make 25 pieces.

Low Carb Chocolate Frosting:
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened (not melted)
5 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1 cup sugar substitute (recommended: Splenda)
1/3 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon no sugar added vanilla extract
Few drops hot water, as needed, to thin consistency

Place all ingredients in a medium bowl and whisk until
well combined. Use to frost brownies, but make sure
brownies are completely cooled, or the butter in the
frosting will melt.

Nutrition Information
Nutritional Analysis per Serving Calories 152
Total Fat 14 grams Saturated Fat 7 grams
Carbohydrates 6 grams Net Carbohydrates 4 grams
Fiber 2 grams

Episode#: LL1A13
Copyright 2003 Television Food Network, G.P., All
ights Reserved

--
No Husband Has Ever Been Shot While Doing The Dishes


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 31-05-2005, 10:15 PM
Alan S
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 31 May 2005 05:16:53 GMT, Karen Sexton
wrote:

hello,

I'm not diabetic, just controlling my sugar intake and trying to lose
weight.


snip

There is Type II onset diabetes in my family (grandfather) - but so
far my mother (76) and uncle (93) haven't had it. I don't feel good
when I eat sugar, just sluggish, mostly.


Hi Karen

I'm sorry to say that, with that genetic background, and
those symptoms, I don't think your opening comment will
remain one you can make for too much longer.

Particularly if you continue looking for good chocolate cake
recipes, unless you can find ones that also have no flour as
well as no sugar.

Have you been tested by your doctor for diabetes? If not,
I'd suggest you ask specifically at your next regular
appointment.

I'll echo NoneGiven's advice. Cheap blood glucose meters are
available - let people here know where you live and they can
offer advice there. Even if you aren't diabetic, you may be
surprised at your blood glucose readings at the times you
are "feeling sluggish".


Cheers Alan, T2, Australia.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 11:02 AM
Karen Sexton
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Tue, 31 May 2005 08:43:10 -0500, "None Given"
wrote:

"Karen Sexton" wrote in message
.. .

There is Type II onset diabetes in my family (grandfather) - but so
far my mother (76) and uncle (93) haven't had it. I don't feel good
when I eat sugar, just sluggish, mostly.


You should get a meter and test after you do that, it may tell you why you
feel that way. That feeling usually means my BG went too high. That too
high figure for me is still far below the diagnosis criteria.

If you just want to cut back the amount of sugar you could use the Splenda
or the Splenda blend in regular recipes, or even cut the blend with more
straight Splenda. I find substituting straight Splenda for sugar one to one
leaves an aftertaste so I use a little less than the recipe calls for. You
can also use Splenda mixed with another sweetener like Diabetisweet, not
sure of the spelling but it is a sugar alcohol and available in the pharmacy
section of Wal-Mart. You should also google for low carb or diabetic
recipes, that's where you will find the ones that cut down on the sugar.
There was a recipe that uses tofu on one of these groups, I don't remember
who posted it but here it is. I haven't tried it yet.

SUGAR-FREE TOFU MOUSSE

1 pound pack silken tofu
4 ounces bitter baking chocolate
1/4 - 1/3 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
Water to dissolve the cocoa powder in (Add by tablespoonfuls.)
Artificial sweetener to taste (Start with 25 packs.)
1-2 teaspoons vanilla extract (optional but good)
1 -2 egg whites from "Just Whites," beaten stiff (but not
dry)(Optional)

Beat the tofu until all liquidy, preferably in a food processor. Mix the
cocoa powder with cold water until it is dissolved but thick (paste like,
not cocoa drink- like). Melt the baking chocolate. Add chocolate,
sweetener, cocoa and vanilla to the tofu and mix until well blended. Fold
in egg whites if using. Serve at room temperature in small portions as it
is quite overwhelming.

It keeps pretty well in the fridge for several days. It would keep longer
without the egg whites.
+++++++++++++
I got this one from the low carb show on the food network, I may try it
with almond flour instead of soy next time. I thank the soy tastes a
little flat. I didn't bother with the frosting because I've never used a
frosting on brownies.

Low Carb Double Chocolate Walnut Brownies
Yield: 25 servings

1 1/2 tablespoons wheat bran, or oat bran
1 1/4 cups plus 1/2 tablespoon soy flour
4 ounces unsweetened baking chocolate
1/2 cup unsalted butter
2 cups sugar substitute (recommended: Splenda)
1/2 cup heavy cream
5 large eggs
1 tablespoon no sugar added vanilla extract
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
Low Carb Chocolate Frosting, recipe follows

Special Equipment: 8-inch square baking pan

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Spray pan with nonstick vegetable oil cooking spray.
Set aside. Mix wheat bran and 1/2 tablespoon soy flour
together and sprinkle evenly over the inside of the
greased pan, also coating the sides.

Place the unsweetened chocolate and butter in a steel
bowl and melt over a saucepan of simmering water. Whisk
in 1 cup sugar substitute and 1/4 cup heavy cream. Once
thoroughly blended, turn off heat and keep warm until
needed.

With an electric mixer on high, beat the eggs, 1 cup
sugar substitute and the vanilla extract just until
blended. Reduce to low speed and then blend in the
chocolate mixture.

With a wooden spoon, mix in the baking powder,
1 1/4 cups soy flour, walnuts, and 1/4 cup heavy cream.
Spread evenly into the prepared pan and bake on the
center rack for 35 to 40 minutes, or until a toothpick
inserted in the center comes out clean. (Do not over-
bake or brownies will be dry and hard.) Cool completely
before frosting with low carb chocolate frosting. Cut
into 5 rows by 5 rows to make 25 pieces.

Low Carb Chocolate Frosting:
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened (not melted)
5 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder
1 cup sugar substitute (recommended: Splenda)
1/3 cup heavy cream
1 teaspoon no sugar added vanilla extract
Few drops hot water, as needed, to thin consistency

Place all ingredients in a medium bowl and whisk until
well combined. Use to frost brownies, but make sure
brownies are completely cooled, or the butter in the
frosting will melt.

Nutrition Information
Nutritional Analysis per Serving Calories 152
Total Fat 14 grams Saturated Fat 7 grams
Carbohydrates 6 grams Net Carbohydrates 4 grams
Fiber 2 grams

Episode#: LL1A13
Copyright 2003 Television Food Network, G.P., All
ights Reserved




Hey, thanks alot- I'm going to try the brownies. I just need a
chocolate fix without too much sugar!

About my BG level- I've had so many glucose tolerance tests (the 7
hour one) and it always comes out ok. Just once they said it was low,
but not low enough to be considered hypoglycemic.

I just think that since I've been dieting, I got my system used to not
having sugar, and now it bothers me in some way.

Karen
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 11:08 AM
Karen Sexton
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 07:15:46 +1000, Alan S
wrote:

On Tue, 31 May 2005 05:16:53 GMT, Karen Sexton
wrote:

hello,

I'm not diabetic, just controlling my sugar intake and trying to lose
weight.


snip

There is Type II onset diabetes in my family (grandfather) - but so
far my mother (76) and uncle (93) haven't had it. I don't feel good
when I eat sugar, just sluggish, mostly.


Hi Karen

I'm sorry to say that, with that genetic background, and
those symptoms, I don't think your opening comment will
remain one you can make for too much longer.

Particularly if you continue looking for good chocolate cake
recipes, unless you can find ones that also have no flour as
well as no sugar.

Have you been tested by your doctor for diabetes? If not,
I'd suggest you ask specifically at your next regular
appointment.

I'll echo NoneGiven's advice. Cheap blood glucose meters are
available - let people here know where you live and they can
offer advice there. Even if you aren't diabetic, you may be
surprised at your blood glucose readings at the times you
are "feeling sluggish".


Cheers Alan, T2, Australia.



I hope I'm not a T2 in the making, but that's why I watch my sugar- I
don't eat that much flour or white starches. I've never used almond
flour, so I'll try to find some.

My mom is 76, and even though she has no diabetes, I am concerned- she
is terribly overweight and eats so much sugar and starch. She knows
what she's doing is bad, but doesn't have the willpower to stop (she's
very depressed and eats "comfort foods". We both have physicals
regularly, but if a person doesn't have the willpower, what can you
do? I've tried to get her to go to weight-watchers, to no avail.

Thank you,

Karen


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 03:20 PM
None Given
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Karen Sexton" wrote in message
...
About my BG level- I've had so many glucose tolerance tests (the 7
hour one) and it always comes out ok. Just once they said it was low,
but not low enough to be considered hypoglycemic.



You can be well on the way toward getting diabetes and they might still tell
you you're ok. You need to know the numbers and times of the results to
know for yourself. Having the symptoms you mentioned, I would want to take
action now to avoid a dx in the future, by tracking what different foods in
my diet were doing to my BGs and adjusting my meals to minimize BG spikes.
Every time your BG goes high it could be causing damage to your body, before
your fasting #s or A1c reaches the dx criteria, even before the OGTT reaches
it. I think you have to be 200 to be dx but I feel bad 140 and try to stay
below that at all times.
http://www.alt-support-diabetes.org/...0Diagnosed.htm

I just think that since I've been dieting, I got my system used to not
having sugar, and now it bothers me in some way.


If your diet has been serving to lower your average or PP BGs by reducing
the amount of fast carb you are eating, it is possible that your body was
accustomed to running with higher BGs than healthy and now you are getting
lower BGs and so you notice the difference when you eat the fast carb and go
too high.

--
No Husband Has Ever Been Shot While Doing The Dishes




  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 04:19 PM
None Given
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Karen Sexton" wrote in message
...

My mom is 76, and even though she has no diabetes, I am concerned- she
is terribly overweight and eats so much sugar and starch. She knows
what she's doing is bad, but doesn't have the willpower to stop (she's
very depressed and eats "comfort foods". We both have physicals
regularly, but if a person doesn't have the willpower, what can you
do? I've tried to get her to go to weight-watchers, to no avail.



Take baby steps, start with a high protein breakfast. When carbohydrates
are a problem, morning can be the worst time to eat them, if you have any
foods containing carbs at breakfast make them lower carb ones, like peppers,
onion, mushroom, etc in an omelet or berries in plain yogurt, etc.
Adequate protein in the morning can help reduce carb cravings for the rest
of the day, whereas I found that eating oatmeal first thing in the morning
can actually triple my appetite for the rest of the day.

Also, add more non starchy veggies throughout the day for lunch, dinner, and
snacks. They have lots of water and fiber in them besides the vitamins and
things so they help fill you up. You can prepare ahead of time, carrot,
celery, or other raw veggie sticks/chunks for dipping, a sour cream, plain
yogurt, or cheese based dip, salad greens torn and mixed in a ziploc bag or
large plastic container and have other things ready like radish or cucumber
slices, small tomatoes, cheese cubes, boiled eggs, grilled chicken, whatever
sounds good to be eaten with the salad greens with some type of oily
dressing which helps your body metabolize the nutrients in the veggies.
Fill yourself up with good things and drink plenty of water to keep things
moving and you will almost automatically develop the willpower to reduce the
amount of bad things because it probably isn't willpower that's the problem
in the first place. Just make sure it's as easy to reach for the good
stuff as the bad stuff and eat often enough that you never get to the point
of being ravenous.

Many older women do not get adequate protein, especially when they are
filling up on comfort foods. Getting your mother to promise to add some
things to her diet may be much, much easier than getting her to promise to
reduce her comfort foods. Eating carby comfort foods raise serotonin levels
in the brain temporarily, then they crash again making you want more, I
think the effect is worse in the carbohydrate intolerant than in normals and
can be a factor in depression. Getting more exercise can help with that,
also, maybe you can get your mother to take walks with you, or if mobility
is a problem there are exercise videos available for special needs, the PBS
series Sit and be Fit is one resource. Make sure to consult with her
doctor about any health problems, for example, kidney disease may require
her to keep protein fairly low and go with mostly vegetable sources of it,
heart disease may affect what kind of exercise she can do.

--
No Husband Has Ever Been Shot While Doing The Dishes



  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 05:15 PM
Nicky
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Karen Sexton" wrote in message
...
My mom is 76, and even though she has no diabetes, I am concerned- she
is terribly overweight and eats so much sugar and starch. She knows
what she's doing is bad, but doesn't have the willpower to stop (she's
very depressed and eats "comfort foods". We both have physicals
regularly, but if a person doesn't have the willpower, what can you
do?


Try a low-carb diet - if she wants to, some would say that she ought to be
able to eat what she wants at 76! It has two great benefits - first it's
appetite-supressing, so doesn't need huge amounts of willpower, and second
it breaks the cycle that often builds up, where you eat something starchy,
your body over-reacts in terms of insulin production, so you get hungry
quickly, eat something starchy... You might find you benefit too.

Of course, checking with a doctor first - particularly your mother - is a
good idea before starting any diet.

Nicky.

--
A1c 10.5/4.5/6 Weight 95/76/72Kg
1g Metformin, 100ug Thyroxine
T2 DX 05/2004


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 05:24 PM
Jennifer
 
Posts: n/a
Default



Nicky wrote:

"Karen Sexton" wrote in message
...

My mom is 76, and even though she has no diabetes, I am concerned- she
is terribly overweight and eats so much sugar and starch. She knows
what she's doing is bad, but doesn't have the willpower to stop (she's
very depressed and eats "comfort foods". We both have physicals
regularly, but if a person doesn't have the willpower, what can you
do?


You say your mother is very depressed.

Depression is a physical / chemical disease. It can be helped by a
combination of medical and psychological intervention.

Perhaps what you call her lack of willpower may be her clinical
depression.


Jennifer

  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 05:34 PM
Priscilla Ballou
 
Posts: n/a
Default

In article t,
Jennifer wrote:
Nicky wrote:
"Karen Sexton" wrote in message
...
My mom is 76, and even though she has no diabetes, I am concerned- she
is terribly overweight and eats so much sugar and starch. She knows
what she's doing is bad, but doesn't have the willpower to stop (she's
very depressed and eats "comfort foods". We both have physicals
regularly, but if a person doesn't have the willpower, what can you
do?


You say your mother is very depressed.

Depression is a physical / chemical disease. It can be helped by a
combination of medical and psychological intervention.
Perhaps what you call her lack of willpower may be her clinical
depression.


Very very true. Inability to get things done or to take care of oneself
is a big hallmark of depression for some folks. Believe me -- I know
all too well what I'm talking about! Your mother needs psychiatric
intervention. Depression is a serious illness and has very negative
effects on the body -- brain and cardiac system among others.

Priscilla
--
"Inside every older person is a younger person -- wondering what
the hell happened." -- Cora Harvey Armstrong


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 08:56 PM
Alan S
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 10:08:34 GMT, Karen Sexton
wrote:

On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 07:15:46 +1000, Alan S
wrote:

On Tue, 31 May 2005 05:16:53 GMT, Karen Sexton
wrote:

hello,

I'm not diabetic, just controlling my sugar intake and trying to lose
weight.


snip

There is Type II onset diabetes in my family (grandfather) - but so
far my mother (76) and uncle (93) haven't had it. I don't feel good
when I eat sugar, just sluggish, mostly.


Hi Karen

I'm sorry to say that, with that genetic background, and
those symptoms, I don't think your opening comment will
remain one you can make for too much longer.

Particularly if you continue looking for good chocolate cake
recipes, unless you can find ones that also have no flour as
well as no sugar.

Have you been tested by your doctor for diabetes? If not,
I'd suggest you ask specifically at your next regular
appointment.

I'll echo NoneGiven's advice. Cheap blood glucose meters are
available - let people here know where you live and they can
offer advice there. Even if you aren't diabetic, you may be
surprised at your blood glucose readings at the times you
are "feeling sluggish".


Cheers Alan, T2, Australia.



I hope I'm not a T2 in the making, but that's why I watch my sugar- I
don't eat that much flour or white starches. I've never used almond
flour, so I'll try to find some.

My mom is 76, and even though she has no diabetes, I am concerned- she
is terribly overweight and eats so much sugar and starch. She knows
what she's doing is bad, but doesn't have the willpower to stop (she's
very depressed and eats "comfort foods". We both have physicals
regularly, but if a person doesn't have the willpower, what can you
do? I've tried to get her to go to weight-watchers, to no avail.


Hi Karen

First, on willpower, are you referring to Mum or yourself?
Obviously you can't give her willpower and there's a limit
beyond which advice becomes nagging. I don't have any simple
answers beyond setting her an example and some oblique
persuasion.

However, for yourself, "watching my sugar" is not the point.
My general advice would be to buy that meter, not to get
stressed about it but to give yourself the advantage of an
advance warning if the time comes when you do need to come
back to us as a fully qualified member of the club.

One thing that I've seen repeatedly since joining these
groups is that those diagnosed early in the progression find
it easier to gain some control using diet and exercise.

So, don't become a hypochondriac but occasional tests an
hour after you eat may provide some warning messages.

In the interim, I'd suggest "watching" the starches (flours,
breads, rice, potatoes, corn, pasta, corn products etc) as
well as the sugars and snacking on nuts instead of cakes and
cookies.

Also, congratulations on starting to lose weight - what I
just said won't hurt there either.


Cheers Alan, T2, Australia.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 01-06-2005, 11:14 PM
Tiger Lily
 
Posts: n/a
Default

and to Alan's fine post may i add

eat lots of 'free veggies' which can be found in
my sig file......... go to the web page :-)

kate
--
Join us in the Diabetic-Talk Chatroom on UnderNet
/server irc.undernet.org --- /join #Diabetic-Talk
More info: http://www.diabetic-talk.org/
http://www.diabetic-talk.org/freeveggies.htm
I have no medical qualifications beyond my own
experience.
Choose your advisers carefully, because experience
can be
an expensive teacher.

"Alan S"
wrote in message
...
On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 10:08:34 GMT, Karen Sexton
wrote:

On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 07:15:46 +1000, Alan S
wrote:

On Tue, 31 May 2005 05:16:53 GMT, Karen Sexton
wrote:

hello,

I'm not diabetic, just controlling my sugar

intake and trying to lose
weight.

snip

There is Type II onset diabetes in my family

(grandfather) - but so
far my mother (76) and uncle (93) haven't

had it. I don't feel good
when I eat sugar, just sluggish, mostly.


Hi Karen

I'm sorry to say that, with that genetic

background, and
those symptoms, I don't think your opening

comment will
remain one you can make for too much longer.

Particularly if you continue looking for good

chocolate cake
recipes, unless you can find ones that also

have no flour as
well as no sugar.

Have you been tested by your doctor for

diabetes? If not,
I'd suggest you ask specifically at your next

regular
appointment.

I'll echo NoneGiven's advice. Cheap blood

glucose meters are
available - let people here know where you

live and they can
offer advice there. Even if you aren't

diabetic, you may be
surprised at your blood glucose readings at

the times you
are "feeling sluggish".


Cheers Alan, T2, Australia.



I hope I'm not a T2 in the making, but that's

why I watch my sugar- I
don't eat that much flour or white starches.

I've never used almond
flour, so I'll try to find some.

My mom is 76, and even though she has no

diabetes, I am concerned- she
is terribly overweight and eats so much sugar

and starch. She knows
what she's doing is bad, but doesn't have the

willpower to stop (she's
very depressed and eats "comfort foods". We

both have physicals
regularly, but if a person doesn't have the

willpower, what can you
do? I've tried to get her to go to

weight-watchers, to no avail.


Hi Karen

First, on willpower, are you referring to Mum or

yourself?
Obviously you can't give her willpower and

there's a limit
beyond which advice becomes nagging. I don't

have any simple
answers beyond setting her an example and some

oblique
persuasion.

However, for yourself, "watching my sugar" is

not the point.
My general advice would be to buy that meter,

not to get
stressed about it but to give yourself the

advantage of an
advance warning if the time comes when you do

need to come
back to us as a fully qualified member of the

club.

One thing that I've seen repeatedly since

joining these
groups is that those diagnosed early in the

progression find
it easier to gain some control using diet and

exercise.

So, don't become a hypochondriac but occasional

tests an
hour after you eat may provide some warning

messages.

In the interim, I'd suggest "watching" the

starches (flours,
breads, rice, potatoes, corn, pasta, corn

products etc) as
well as the sugars and snacking on nuts instead

of cakes and
cookies.

Also, congratulations on starting to lose

weight - what I
just said won't hurt there either.


Cheers Alan, T2, Australia.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.



  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-06-2005, 06:36 AM
Karen Sexton
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 01 Jun 2005 16:24:08 GMT, Jennifer
wrote:



Nicky wrote:

"Karen Sexton" wrote in message
...

My mom is 76, and even though she has no diabetes, I am concerned- she
is terribly overweight and eats so much sugar and starch. She knows
what she's doing is bad, but doesn't have the willpower to stop (she's
very depressed and eats "comfort foods". We both have physicals
regularly, but if a person doesn't have the willpower, what can you
do?


You say your mother is very depressed.

Depression is a physical / chemical disease. It can be helped by a
combination of medical and psychological intervention.

Perhaps what you call her lack of willpower may be her clinical
depression.


She has been under the Dr's care for decades and takes
anti-depressants which also make it harder to lose weight, so I can't
fault her- I know what it's like- I have also inherited the gene for
depression and anxiety. On one hand, I can see that at 76 she might
as well eat what she wants- it just makes me feel burdened that she
can't enjoy her life because of her weight.

KS
  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-06-2005, 06:41 AM
Karen Sexton
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Thu, 02 Jun 2005 05:56:51 +1000, Alan S
wrote:

Karen S. wrote:


I hope I'm not a T2 in the making, but that's why I watch my sugar- I
don't eat that much flour or white starches. I've never used almond
flour, so I'll try to find some.

My mom is 76, and even though she has no diabetes, I am concerned- she
is terribly overweight and eats so much sugar and starch. She knows
what she's doing is bad, but doesn't have the willpower to stop (she's
very depressed and eats "comfort foods". We both have physicals
regularly, but if a person doesn't have the willpower, what can you
do? I've tried to get her to go to weight-watchers, to no avail.


Hi Karen

First, on willpower, are you referring to Mum or yourself?


My mother.


Obviously you can't give her willpower and there's a limit
beyond which advice becomes nagging.


I know that all too well.

I don't have any simple
answers beyond setting her an example and some oblique
persuasion.

However, for yourself, "watching my sugar" is not the point.
My general advice would be to buy that meter, not to get
stressed about it but to give yourself the advantage of an
advance warning if the time comes when you do need to come
back to us as a fully qualified member of the club.


I thought about it all last night- what you said about chocolate
recipes. What did you mean- that craving chocolate, even with Splenda
is a warning sign?



One thing that I've seen repeatedly since joining these
groups is that those diagnosed early in the progression find
it easier to gain some control using diet and exercise.



My grandfather was T2 and controlled it with diet.


So, don't become a hypochondriac but occasional tests an
hour after you eat may provide some warning messages.

In the interim, I'd suggest "watching" the starches (flours,
breads, rice, potatoes, corn, pasta, corn products etc) as
well as the sugars and snacking on nuts instead of cakes and
cookies.

Also, congratulations on starting to lose weight - what I
just said won't hurt there either.


I'm trying- you all know how hard it is to lose weight after 50!



Cheers Alan, T2, Australia.



KS
  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-06-2005, 06:43 AM
Karen Sexton
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 1 Jun 2005 16:14:37 -0600, "Tiger Lily"
wrote:

and to Alan's fine post may i add

eat lots of 'free veggies' which can be found in
my sig file......... go to the web page :-)



Thank you!

KS
kate




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