Diabetic (alt.food.diabetic) This group is for the discussion of controlled-portion eating plans for the dietary management of diabetes.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 22-07-2013, 04:38 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 168
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/21/2013 12:50 PM, Billy wrote:
also
called "traditional medicine",

or nutraceuticals


My understanding of "nutraceuticals" is that they are
refined natural products and not the unrefined stuff
that herbalists usually use. Herbalists use both.

This is why I like the phrase "Traditional Medicine".
It does not limit, vitamins, herbs, nutraceuticals,
etc..

Some nutraceuticals get a little too close to
pharmaceuticals, which can give anaphylactic shock.

I could be wrong now. (I am sure I will be told so,
if I am. Which is okay, as long as you are nice about
it)

-T


Dictionary
nutraceutical
noun
a food containing health-giving additives and having medicinal benefit.
----

Wikipeda
Nutraceutical, a portmanteau of the words ³nutrition² and
³pharmaceutical² and was coined by Dr. Stephen L. DeFelice, founder and
chairman of the Foundation of Innovation Medicine (FIM), Crawford, New
Jersey.[1] The term is applied to products that range from isolated
nutrients, dietary supplements and herbal products, specific diets,
genetically modified food, and processed foods such as cereals, soups,
and beverages.

------

I used the word nutraceutical in the dictionary sense, since this a.f.d.
is food group.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg

  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-07-2013, 06:30 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 168
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

In article ,
Trawley Trash wrote:

On Sun, 21 Jul 2013 19:44:55 -0700
Todd wrote:

Bitter melon had a modest hypoglycemic effect and significantly
reduced fructosamine levels from baseline among patients with type 2
diabetes who received 2,000 mg/day. However, the hypoglycemic effect
of bitter melon was less than metformin 1,000 mg/day.


Generally I take 100000 to 200000 milligrams of bitter melon.
Chicken soup with bitter melon and potato/mung bean noodles is to
die for. No bacon needed.


How many micro liters of soup is that?

Since this is a culinary group, and not a science lab, you probably
should have said 3 1/2 oz. to 7 oz. of bitter melon just to keep the
appropriate motif.

I couldn't find your recipe, so here's a different one.

Bitter gourd, Carrot, Mushroom Chicken Soup Recipe

Cook Time
Prep time: 15 min
Cook time: 2 hours
Ready in: 2 hours 15 min
Yields: Serves 5 people

Ingredients
50g Dried Mushroom
100g bitter gourd
100g chicken
50g carrot
10g fresh ginger
Seasonings
1 tsp of salt
Pinch of black pepper powder

Methods
1. Soak the dried mushroom in hot water for 15 minutes to soften it.
Rinse it thoroughly again with cold water.
2. Cut the bitter gourd into half and remove the internal seeds. Then,
cut the bitter gourd into square shape. Rub the cut bitter gourd with
plenty of salt and leave it for about half an hour and then rinse the
salt off. This will reduce bitterness of the bitter gourd.
3. Clean the chicken, remove the skin, and cut it into small pieces.
4. Peel the carrot skin and cut it into square pieces.
5. Peel the ginger skin and cut it into slices.
6. Boil about 3 cups of water in a pot.
7. Add in chicken and bitter gourd and boil at medium fire for 5 minutes.
8. Pour the chicken and bitter gourd soup into a slow cooker.
9. Add in mushroom, carrot and ginger.
10. Simmer the soup for 1.5 hour.
11. Add in salt and pepper for taste.
And it is ready for serving.

(I'd probably add a little poultry seasoning to taste)
1 teaspoon dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon dried sage
1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg
  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-07-2013, 03:55 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 82
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On Mon, 22 Jul 2013 22:30:06 -0700
Billy wrote:

In article ,
Trawley Trash wrote:

On Sun, 21 Jul 2013 19:44:55 -0700
Todd wrote:

Bitter melon had a modest hypoglycemic effect and significantly
reduced fructosamine levels from baseline among patients with
type 2 diabetes who received 2,000 mg/day. However, the
hypoglycemic effect of bitter melon was less than metformin 1,000
mg/day.


Generally I take 100000 to 200000 milligrams of bitter melon.
Chicken soup with bitter melon and potato/mung bean noodles is to
die for. No bacon needed.


How many micro liters of soup is that?


Depends on how much water I add.

Since this is a culinary group, and not a science lab, you probably
should have said 3 1/2 oz. to 7 oz. of bitter melon just to keep the
appropriate motif.


I couldn't find your recipe, so here's a different one.


Sorry. I have a kitchen scale and use grams.

I don't use recipes, but I put this together out of a need to consume
leftover chicken stock. This is what I remember doing. I use
an induction hotplate. Onions are not good for fructose
intolerance, but small amounts that are thoroughly cooked seem
to be OK for me. It certainly did not take two hours to make:

500 gm chicken stock (approximate)
1/2 medium onion, sliced
150 gm cubed chicken breast
1 bitter melon (about 150 gm)
25 gm sliced fresh ginger
1 small lime
1 packet noodles (sweet potato, mung bean, or potato).
additional leftover veggies (I think I added shredded cabbage).

Boil some water, pour over noodles, and cover.

Set induction burner to 260 degrees F.

Melt a tablespoon of coconut oil in a skillet.

Add sliced onion and stir so it is coated with oil.

Add chicken and a little water.

Cover and stir-fry 2-3 minutes.

Add bitter melon and ginger. More water as needed.

Cover and continue to stir-fry.

Drain hot water from noodles and replace with cold water.

Add chicken stock and leftover veggies.

Add 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) turmeric.

Add 1 teaspoon gluten-free and sugar-free tamari.

Bring to boil and remove from heat.

Drain and add cold noodles.

Squeeze lime into soup.

Add salt to taste and perhaps a couple of slices from a jalapeno
pepper. Bean sprouts are also good at this point.

This is a full meal for me.

--
I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.

  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-07-2013, 07:47 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 168
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

In article ,
Trawley Trash wrote:

On Mon, 22 Jul 2013 22:30:06 -0700
Billy wrote:

In article ,
Trawley Trash wrote:

On Sun, 21 Jul 2013 19:44:55 -0700
Todd wrote:

Bitter melon had a modest hypoglycemic effect and significantly
reduced fructosamine levels from baseline among patients with
type 2 diabetes who received 2,000 mg/day. However, the
hypoglycemic effect of bitter melon was less than metformin 1,000
mg/day.

Generally I take 100000 to 200000 milligrams of bitter melon.
Chicken soup with bitter melon and potato/mung bean noodles is to
die for. No bacon needed.


How many micro liters of soup is that?


Depends on how much water I add.

Since this is a culinary group, and not a science lab, you probably
should have said 3 1/2 oz. to 7 oz. of bitter melon just to keep the
appropriate motif.


I couldn't find your recipe, so here's a different one.


Sorry. I have a kitchen scale and use grams.

I don't use recipes, but I put this together out of a need to consume
leftover chicken stock. This is what I remember doing. I use
an induction hotplate. Onions are not good for fructose
intolerance, but small amounts that are thoroughly cooked seem
to be OK for me. It certainly did not take two hours to make:

500 gm chicken stock (approximate)
1/2 medium onion, sliced
150 gm cubed chicken breast
1 bitter melon (about 150 gm)
25 gm sliced fresh ginger
1 small lime
1 packet noodles (sweet potato, mung bean, or potato).
additional leftover veggies (I think I added shredded cabbage).

Boil some water, pour over noodles, and cover.

Set induction burner to 260 degrees F.

Melt a tablespoon of coconut oil in a skillet.

Add sliced onion and stir so it is coated with oil.

Add chicken and a little water.

Cover and stir-fry 2-3 minutes.

Add bitter melon and ginger. More water as needed.

Cover and continue to stir-fry.

Drain hot water from noodles and replace with cold water.

Add chicken stock and leftover veggies.

Add 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 ml) turmeric.

Add 1 teaspoon gluten-free and sugar-free tamari.

Bring to boil and remove from heat.

Drain and add cold noodles.

Squeeze lime into soup.

Add salt to taste and perhaps a couple of slices from a jalapeno
pepper. Bean sprouts are also good at this point.

This is a full meal for me.


A little bitter melon here, a little blueberry and hawthorn leaf there,
and some stevia to sweeten the pot (non-combustible, of course), and
it's all good.

Thanks for the recipe.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg
  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-07-2013, 08:58 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Foat Wuth
Posts: 1,161
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd View Post
On 07/15/2013 02:21 PM, bigwheel wrote:
Guess the Eyetalian part of the family tree is not large enough to
develop a taste for eggplant. Never even tasted one till I was fully
grown. They always looked sorta weird.


Hi Big,

My "Eyetalian part" would be my mom's side. Yours?

There is a difference between fully grown and too old.
If you get them from a local farm, ask the farmer and
he will show you (as one did me) how to pick them.
Be careful, the buzzards have thorns! (At my
local farm, they go so quick, they never get too old.)

The local farms said they would have some in a week
or two. I will be begging for advice on how to
cook them when that happens. I got the pressure
cooker down, but not the frying.

Oh ya, and egg plant tastes like heck (not the
actual word I was thinking) when it is not grown
properly and sits on a shelf forever. Find a CSA farm.

-T

Maybe next year, I will try growing them.
Never been to an egg plant farm. Think our horticulture folks are concentrating on growing guv'ment subsidized corn so Alfgore and Obie can waste it making ethanol to damage our cars. Wacky tobaccy seems to be other big cash crop in these parts.


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-07-2013, 11:16 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 168
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

In article ,
bigwheel wrote:

Todd;1849654 Wrote:
On 07/15/2013 02:21 PM, bigwheel wrote:-
Guess the Eyetalian part of the family tree is not large enough to
develop a taste for eggplant. Never even tasted one till I was fully
grown. They always looked sorta weird.-

Hi Big,

My "Eyetalian part" would be my mom's side. Yours?

There is a difference between fully grown and too old.
If you get them from a local farm, ask the farmer and
he will show you (as one did me) how to pick them.
Be careful, the buzzards have thorns! (At my
local farm, they go so quick, they never get too old.)

The local farms said they would have some in a week
or two. I will be begging for advice on how to
cook them when that happens. I got the pressure
cooker down, but not the frying.

Oh ya, and egg plant tastes like heck (not the
actual word I was thinking) when it is not grown
properly and sits on a shelf forever. Find a CSA farm.

-T

Maybe next year, I will try growing them.


Never been to an egg plant farm. Think our horticulture folks are
concentrating on growing guv'ment subsidized corn so Alfgore and Obie
can waste it making ethanol to damage our cars. Wacky tobaccy seems to
be other big cash crop in these parts.


The Emerald Triangle is just above me (Mendocino, and Humbolt Counties).
There isn't any income tax filed by growers, but it has been estimated
that the marijuana harvest is worth more than the California wine
harvest ($3 billion in 2012).

Funny how the government subsidizes crops that Cargill, and Archer
Daniels Midland uses, but not so much for vegetables that could keep
Americans healthy.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg
  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-07-2013, 07:58 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 720
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/22/2013 08:24 AM, Trawley Trash wrote:
potato/mung bean noodles


Potatoes and beans? How do you get away with all the carbs
in this? Are you T2 or T1?
  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-07-2013, 08:53 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 720
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/22/2013 08:38 AM, Billy wrote:
In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/21/2013 12:50 PM, Billy wrote:
also
called "traditional medicine",
or nutraceuticals


My understanding of "nutraceuticals" is that they are
refined natural products and not the unrefined stuff
that herbalists usually use. Herbalists use both.

This is why I like the phrase "Traditional Medicine".
It does not limit, vitamins, herbs, nutraceuticals,
etc..

Some nutraceuticals get a little too close to
pharmaceuticals, which can give anaphylactic shock.

I could be wrong now. (I am sure I will be told so,
if I am. Which is okay, as long as you are nice about
it)

-T


Dictionary
nutraceutical
noun
a food containing health-giving additives and having medicinal benefit.
----

Wikipeda
Nutraceutical, a portmanteau of the words ³nutrition² and
³pharmaceutical² and was coined by Dr. Stephen L. DeFelice, founder and
chairman of the Foundation of Innovation Medicine (FIM), Crawford, New
Jersey.[1] The term is applied to products that range from isolated
nutrients, dietary supplements and herbal products, specific diets,
genetically modified food, and processed foods such as cereals, soups,
and beverages.

------

I used the word nutraceutical in the dictionary sense, since this a.f.d.
is food group.


Thank you for the update!
  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-07-2013, 08:58 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 720
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/22/2013 08:47 AM, Billy wrote:
ask to traditional medicine. For instance, I use Opuntia
for my NIDDM T2. It will not lower my Blood Glucose too
low. It helps my liver (which just may be the cause of
my T2). It provides food value. It is fun to cook and make
snot jokes about.

And, it doesn't matter how much I eat. NO OVERDOSE! It
is not a poison. (Can you say that for modern medicines?

ERROR, Will Robinson:
O. megacantha raised concern about toxic effects on the kidney and
extracts of O. streptacantha may inhibit alpha-glucosidase activity.

Pompe Disease: a disorder in which alpha-glucosidase is deficient.

While alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, are used as anti-diabetic drugs in
combination with other anti-diabetic drugs, that is not to say that you
can't over indulge. It's not fool-proof.


Hi Billy,

Thank you for the heads up. You must be careful refining herbs.
I can eat as much unrefined as I want. The danger amount
of the refined stuff is far, far more than I'd ever consume.
1000 mg of Met twice a day sends me down the hall to the
point that I can not go to work. 1000 is a standard dosage
too, not an overdose.

So, you are correct, it is all a matter of proportion.
Chemical drugs are a lot more dangerous than (non-toxic)
herbs. You really, really have to overdue it with
herbs, to the point you'd explode, to hurt yourself.

Where is the world do you buy your bitter melon?

-T
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-07-2013, 10:15 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 168
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

In article , Todd
wrote:

On 07/22/2013 08:47 AM, Billy wrote:
ask to traditional medicine. For instance, I use Opuntia
for my NIDDM T2. It will not lower my Blood Glucose too
low. It helps my liver (which just may be the cause of
my T2). It provides food value. It is fun to cook and make
snot jokes about.

And, it doesn't matter how much I eat. NO OVERDOSE! It
is not a poison. (Can you say that for modern medicines?

ERROR, Will Robinson:
O. megacantha raised concern about toxic effects on the kidney and
extracts of O. streptacantha may inhibit alpha-glucosidase activity.

Pompe Disease: a disorder in which alpha-glucosidase is deficient.

While alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, are used as anti-diabetic drugs in
combination with other anti-diabetic drugs, that is not to say that you
can't over indulge. It's not fool-proof.


Hi Billy,

Thank you for the heads up. You must be careful refining herbs.
I can eat as much unrefined as I want. The danger amount
of the refined stuff is far, far more than I'd ever consume.
1000 mg of Met twice a day sends me down the hall to the
point that I can not go to work. 1000 is a standard dosage
too, not an overdose.

So, you are correct, it is all a matter of proportion.
Chemical drugs are a lot more dangerous than (non-toxic)
herbs. You really, really have to overdue it with
herbs, to the point you'd explode, to hurt yourself.

Where is the world do you buy your bitter melon?

-T


I don't. I'm growing it, but I see that our local Asian Market sells it
in season. If you are in Reno you might check for an Asian market in
Sacramento, or if you are in Vegas, try L.A. They may be able to ship to
you.

Moderate Interaction
Be cautious with this combination
€ Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs) interacts with BITTER
MELON
Bitter melon can decrease blood sugar levels. Diabetes medications are
also used to lower blood sugar. Taking bitter melon along with diabetes
medications might cause your blood sugar to be too low. Monitor your
blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to
be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl),
glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone
(Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide
(Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.


BITTER MELON Dosing
The appropriate dose of bitter melon depends on several factors such as
the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there
is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range
of doses for bitter melon. Keep in mind that natural products are not
always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow
relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or
physician or other healthcare professional before using.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg


  #41 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-07-2013, 12:48 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,390
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

Todd wrote:
: On 07/22/2013 08:24 AM, Trawley Trash wrote:
: potato/mung bean noodles

: Potatoes and beans? How do you get away with all the carbs
: in this? Are you T2 or T1?

since Trawley's issue is alleregies to fructose , etc, potatoes seem to
be one of the few carbs that can be managed and I guess beans in some
moderation too. This is why we always use the mantraYMMV(Your Mileage May
Vary) when discussing foods, diets, carb amounts, etc as we all differ.
Trawley's is a rather exptreme cse, but what works, works.

Not all recipes will work for all diabetics and not al diets wil work too.
These topics are much betterd iscussed on either asd or mhd rather than
this food group, which was started a s kind of recipe swap rather than
another site for scientific discussiion

Wendy
  #42 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-07-2013, 06:20 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 82
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On Wed, 24 Jul 2013 11:58:11 -0700
Todd wrote:

On 07/22/2013 08:24 AM, Trawley Trash wrote:
potato/mung bean noodles


Potatoes and beans? How do you get away with all the carbs
in this? Are you T2 or T1?


Type II, but the problem seems to be fructose and galactose.
Grains are out, because they contain fructans. These are
not digestible by us, but intestinal flora can break them
down and release fructose. This gives a delayed reaction that
is difficult to detect, but it is repeatable once I know
to look for it.

Some grasses have more fructans/fructose than others. At the
top of the list is sugar cane. Those with the least are wheat
at 0.7 % and rice with virtually none. Fermenting and cooking
reduce the amount of fructose. It is interesting that the
earliest use of grains was in making beer. This was probably
a thin porridge that was left to ferment. Amerindians used
a similar method to render acorns less toxic by soaking the
flour for several days.

Beans are off my paleo menu, because they contain galactose
and galactans, but as with fructose the amount varies widely.
The worst beans are phaseolus vulgaris: pinto, lima, green,
and almost all the common beans yous see in stores. Again
fermenting, cooking and sprouting can be used to render them less
toxic. Mung beans are a different species, and they seem to be
OK. Long beans are different genus from common beans, and I can eat
those. I have to test any new bean carefully.

There is a limit on the amount of carbs I can eat. I doubt I
will ever eat a plate of pasta again. But 200-300 grams of potatoes
spread through the day seem to be no problem.

--
I'm Trawley Trash, and you haven't heard the last of me yet.

  #43 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-07-2013, 09:31 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Foat Wuth
Posts: 1,161
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy[_8_] View Post
In article ,
bigwheel
wrote:

Todd;1849654 Wrote:
On 07/15/2013 02:21 PM, bigwheel wrote:-
Guess the Eyetalian part of the family tree is not large enough to
develop a taste for eggplant. Never even tasted one till I was fully
grown. They always looked sorta weird.-

Hi Big,

My "Eyetalian part" would be my mom's side. Yours?

There is a difference between fully grown and too old.
If you get them from a local farm, ask the farmer and
he will show you (as one did me) how to pick them.
Be careful, the buzzards have thorns! (At my
local farm, they go so quick, they never get too old.)

The local farms said they would have some in a week
or two. I will be begging for advice on how to
cook them when that happens. I got the pressure
cooker down, but not the frying.

Oh ya, and egg plant tastes like heck (not the
actual word I was thinking) when it is not grown
properly and sits on a shelf forever. Find a CSA farm.

-T

Maybe next year, I will try growing them.


Never been to an egg plant farm. Think our horticulture folks are
concentrating on growing guv'ment subsidized corn so Alfgore and Obie
can waste it making ethanol to damage our cars. Wacky tobaccy seems to
be other big cash crop in these parts.


The Emerald Triangle is just above me (Mendocino, and Humbolt Counties).
There isn't any income tax filed by growers, but it has been estimated
that the marijuana harvest is worth more than the California wine
harvest ($3 billion in 2012).

Funny how the government subsidizes crops that Cargill, and Archer
Daniels Midland uses, but not so much for vegetables that could keep
Americans healthy.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
Israel military detains 5-year-old Palestinian for 'stone throwing' - YouTube

Remember Rachel Corrie
Rachel Corrie Memorial Website

Welcome to the New America.
Naomi Klein - The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism - YouTube
Yes. At the risk of being redundant yet again another time..The inmates are running the asylum.
  #44 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-07-2013, 06:00 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 168
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

In article ,
bigwheel wrote:

'Billy[_8_ Wrote:
;1851522']In article ,
bigwheel
wrote:
-
Todd;1849654 Wrote: -
On 07/15/2013 02:21 PM, bigwheel wrote:-
Guess the Eyetalian part of the family tree is not large enough to
develop a taste for eggplant. Never even tasted one till I was fully
grown. They always looked sorta weird.-

Hi Big,

My "Eyetalian part" would be my mom's side. Yours?

There is a difference between fully grown and too old.
If you get them from a local farm, ask the farmer and
he will show you (as one did me) how to pick them.
Be careful, the buzzards have thorns! (At my
local farm, they go so quick, they never get too old.)

The local farms said they would have some in a week
or two. I will be begging for advice on how to
cook them when that happens. I got the pressure
cooker down, but not the frying.

Oh ya, and egg plant tastes like heck (not the
actual word I was thinking) when it is not grown
properly and sits on a shelf forever. Find a CSA farm.

-T

Maybe next year, I will try growing them.-

Never been to an egg plant farm. Think our horticulture folks are
concentrating on growing guv'ment subsidized corn so Alfgore and Obie
can waste it making ethanol to damage our cars. Wacky tobaccy seems to
be other big cash crop in these parts.-

The Emerald Triangle is just above me (Mendocino, and Humbolt Counties).

There isn't any income tax filed by growers, but it has been estimated
that the marijuana harvest is worth more than the California wine
harvest ($3 billion in 2012).

Funny how the government subsidizes crops that Cargill, and Archer
Daniels Midland uses, but not so much for vegetables that could keep
Americans healthy.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
'Israel military detains 5-year-old Palestinian for 'stone
throwing' - YouTube' (
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg)

Remember Rachel Corrie
'Rachel Corrie Memorial Website' (http://www.rachelcorrie.org/)

Welcome to the New America.
'Naomi Klein - The Shock Doctrine: The Rise of Disaster Capitalism -
YouTube' (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg)


Yes. At the risk of being redundant yet again another time..The inmates
are running the asylum.


It seems that no matter who becomes President, the pods get them, and
all humanity is sucked out of them. All we get is the flashy smile, and
lots of hollow words.

Made "Steak Diane" sauce the other night. It helped me choke a dry
porter house.

Steak Diane
Servings: makes 2 servings

Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients
€ 8 ozs filet mignon (medallions)
€ pepper
€ salt
€ 1 tbsp butter ? Tasty tip
€ 2 shallots (finely diced)
€ 1 clove garlic (chopped)
€ 1/2 tsp thyme (chopped)
€ 1 cup cremini mushrooms (sliced)
€ 1/4 cup brandy (or cognac)
€ 2 tsps dijon mustard
€ 1/4 cup heavy cream
€ 1/4 cup veal stock ? Tasty tip
€ 2 tsps worcestershire sauce
€ 1 tbsp parsley (chopped)


Directions
1. Season the beef with salt and pepper.
2. Melt the butter in a pan over medium-high heat.
3. Add the beef and sear for 1-2 minutes on each side and set aside.
4. Add the shallots, garlic and thyme and saute for 20 seconds.
5. Add the mushrooms and saute until tender, about 2 minutes.
6. Add the brandy and carefully ignite.
7. Add the mustard and cream and mix while cooking for a minute.
8. Add the veal broth, deglaze the pan and simmer for another minute.
9. Add the Worcestershire sauce, parsley and any juices that
collected under the beef to the pan and remove from heat.
10. Divide the beef and sauce between two plates and enjoy.


It wasn't that bad.
--
Palestinian Child Detained
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zzSzH38jYcg

Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg
  #45 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-07-2013, 06:34 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 720
Default Opinion piece on artificial sweeteners

On 07/25/2013 10:20 AM, Trawley Trash wrote:
On Wed, 24 Jul 2013 11:58:11 -0700
Todd wrote:

On 07/22/2013 08:24 AM, Trawley Trash wrote:
potato/mung bean noodles


Potatoes and beans? How do you get away with all the carbs
in this? Are you T2 or T1?


Type II, but the problem seems to be fructose and galactose.
Grains are out, because they contain fructans. These are
not digestible by us, but intestinal flora can break them
down and release fructose. This gives a delayed reaction that
is difficult to detect, but it is repeatable once I know
to look for it.

Some grasses have more fructans/fructose than others. At the
top of the list is sugar cane. Those with the least are wheat
at 0.7 % and rice with virtually none. Fermenting and cooking
reduce the amount of fructose. It is interesting that the
earliest use of grains was in making beer. This was probably
a thin porridge that was left to ferment. Amerindians used
a similar method to render acorns less toxic by soaking the
flour for several days.

Beans are off my paleo menu, because they contain galactose
and galactans, but as with fructose the amount varies widely.
The worst beans are phaseolus vulgaris: pinto, lima, green,
and almost all the common beans yous see in stores. Again
fermenting, cooking and sprouting can be used to render them less
toxic. Mung beans are a different species, and they seem to be
OK. Long beans are different genus from common beans, and I can eat
those. I have to test any new bean carefully.

There is a limit on the amount of carbs I can eat. I doubt I
will ever eat a plate of pasta again. But 200-300 grams of potatoes
spread through the day seem to be no problem.


Hi Trawley,

What a pain in the neck! It does sound more and more
like your liver.

I loved my pasta and I think that is what did me in
(T2 NIDDM). I am Paleo now too, less the bugs, lizards,
snakes ...

I think beer is what started all this T2 stuff. Once we
discovered beer, we started hybridizing grains to improve
the production of beer.

-T





Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Stevia and artificial sweeteners T[_8_] Diabetic 2 18-10-2016 03:28 PM
Mark Bittman has an opinion piece about the future of our food ImStillMags General Cooking 12 03-02-2011 05:25 PM
Opinion Piece on the "Global Food Chain" Terry Pulliam Burd[_5_] General Cooking 5 27-10-2010 03:07 PM
"Artificial Sweeteners: They're Enough to Give Some People aHeadache" mike Tea 0 06-03-2009 03:33 AM
"Artificial Sweeteners: They're Enough to Give Some People aHeadache" mike General Cooking 0 06-03-2009 03:31 AM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 07:08 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017