Diabetic (alt.food.diabetic) This group is for the discussion of controlled-portion eating plans for the dietary management of diabetes.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 20-06-2013, 08:22 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 103
Default Eat the Weed!

Billy wrote:

In article ,
Bjørn Steensrud wrote:

Billy wrote:

In article ,
Bj?rn Steensrud wrote:

Billy wrote:

In article ,
bigwheel wrote:

Todd;1839892 Wrote:
Hi All,

My favorite weed: Purslane.

Great for us.
Cooked: 1 cup, 4 grams carb
Raw (my favorite): 1 cup, 1 gram carb

According to tis proponents, it is the single most
nutritious plant on the face of this earth. More
Omega 3 that even fish oil.

'Purslane Recipes from Prairieland Community Supported
Agriculture, Prairieland CSA, PCSA, Champaign, Illinois'
(http://www.prairielandcsa.org/recipes/purslane.html)

Mark Sisson (Mark's Daily Blog) has a nice write
up and picture too:

'Why Does the FDA Call This Omega-3-Rich Green a Weed? |
Mark's Daily Apple'
(http://www.marksdailyapple.com/purslane/)

The stuff grows in my rocks all around my house.
I don't water it. I step on it. No TLC whatsoever.

Love to eat it raw. In salads, on burgers, just
by itself. Tastes a little bit like watercress.
And, I always feel better when I eat this weed.
My Wife's eyes sparkle when I pick and wash her
up a hand full. It doesn't last more than a few
minutes in the house.

Okay, for those of you who haven't gone through
an Economic Botany course in college, a weed it not
what you think it is:

1) It must be a previous agricultural "discard"
(Dandelions, plantain are other good examples).

2) its seeds must be very small or mimic those
of other seeds. (Purslane's are really small.)

3) it must grow on "disturbed" soil, like were I
walk. (Ever notice that Dandelions grow in cow
pastures but not on wild land?)

So, EAT THE WEED! (I will control myself, eventually.)



One person's weed, is another persons delicacy!

Wow never even heard of that stuff. Swear hanging out on here is a
little going to night school at college. Sorry to hear about the
weed definition. Im thinking of one which aint never been an aggie
discard..got nice sized seeds and dont like having its soil messed
with too much. Somebody will need to rename Wacky Weed..hmmm

"A weed is but an unloved flower."
- Ella Wilcox

"What is a weed? A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been
discovered."
- Ralph Waldo Emerson

A grandchild invited herself and her sister to grandma's nettle soup.
A little late in the season, but grandpa went out to pick the raw
materials, grandma made spinach soup with stinging nettle instead of
spinach, with delicious result. Also with more vitamins and other good
stuff. Try it next spring - pick the tips before they sprout flowers!
Nettle was also used as a source of textile fiber - in the fall, so
don't wait too long to try.

Late in the season?! My god, did they have to do a tonguectomy? I
thought that once nettles became painful, all you could do was make tea
with them. It's not that bad. Stinging Nettle is also supposed to be
very good as a companion plant for bringing out the flavors of culinary
herbs.


:-)
Thanks for the tea tip!

To prepare for soup, just dip in boiling water until soft - a few seconds
- then chop, or run in blender, also a few seconds. Then proceed as with
spinach. "Late in the season" means that the lower part of the stems are
developing fibers, similar to linen fibers. Cloth is made from nettles in
much the same way as linen, but much softer,
closer to cotton in feel. Has probably been used that way for about 4000
years ...


Just to make sure that we are all on the same page, we are talking about
stinging nettles (Urtica dioica), right? THere are all sorts of nettles.
Nettles constitute between twenty-four and thirty-nine species of
flowering plants of the genus Urtica in the family Urticaceae, with
mainly a temperate distribution.


Urtica dioica is the one, yes, it's a perennial. Here there's also a small
annual species, Urtica urens, much rarer and also stinging.

More . . .

http://www.thekitchn.com/stinging-nettles-8-recipes-for-145582

Stinging Nettles: 8 Recipes for Spring Cooking


Thank you! Bookmarked.

(Makes my mouth hurt just thinking about it.)


Why? It's not as if they can still sting after cooking? Unlike chili peppers
that keep burning my mouth for a long time ...


  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 21-06-2013, 07:05 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 168
Default Eat the Weed!

In article ,
Bjørn Steensrud wrote:

Billy wrote:

In article ,
Bjørn Steensrud wrote:

Billy wrote:

In article ,
Bj?rn Steensrud wrote:

Billy wrote:

In article ,
bigwheel wrote:

Todd;1839892 Wrote:
Hi All,

My favorite weed: Purslane.

Great for us.
Cooked: 1 cup, 4 grams carb
Raw (my favorite): 1 cup, 1 gram carb

According to tis proponents, it is the single most
nutritious plant on the face of this earth. More
Omega 3 that even fish oil.

'Purslane Recipes from Prairieland Community Supported
Agriculture, Prairieland CSA, PCSA, Champaign, Illinois'
(http://www.prairielandcsa.org/recipes/purslane.html)

Mark Sisson (Mark's Daily Blog) has a nice write
up and picture too:

'Why Does the FDA Call This Omega-3-Rich Green a Weed? |
Mark's Daily Apple'
(http://www.marksdailyapple.com/purslane/)

The stuff grows in my rocks all around my house.
I don't water it. I step on it. No TLC whatsoever.

Love to eat it raw. In salads, on burgers, just
by itself. Tastes a little bit like watercress.
And, I always feel better when I eat this weed.
My Wife's eyes sparkle when I pick and wash her
up a hand full. It doesn't last more than a few
minutes in the house.

Okay, for those of you who haven't gone through
an Economic Botany course in college, a weed it not
what you think it is:

1) It must be a previous agricultural "discard"
(Dandelions, plantain are other good examples).

2) its seeds must be very small or mimic those
of other seeds. (Purslane's are really small.)

3) it must grow on "disturbed" soil, like were I
walk. (Ever notice that Dandelions grow in cow
pastures but not on wild land?)

So, EAT THE WEED! (I will control myself, eventually.)



One person's weed, is another persons delicacy!

Wow never even heard of that stuff. Swear hanging out on here is a
little going to night school at college. Sorry to hear about the
weed definition. Im thinking of one which aint never been an aggie
discard..got nice sized seeds and dont like having its soil messed
with too much. Somebody will need to rename Wacky Weed..hmmm

"A weed is but an unloved flower."
- Ella Wilcox

"What is a weed? A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been
discovered."
- Ralph Waldo Emerson

A grandchild invited herself and her sister to grandma's nettle soup.
A little late in the season, but grandpa went out to pick the raw
materials, grandma made spinach soup with stinging nettle instead of
spinach, with delicious result. Also with more vitamins and other good
stuff. Try it next spring - pick the tips before they sprout flowers!
Nettle was also used as a source of textile fiber - in the fall, so
don't wait too long to try.

Late in the season?! My god, did they have to do a tonguectomy? I
thought that once nettles became painful, all you could do was make tea
with them. It's not that bad. Stinging Nettle is also supposed to be
very good as a companion plant for bringing out the flavors of culinary
herbs.

:-)
Thanks for the tea tip!

To prepare for soup, just dip in boiling water until soft - a few seconds
- then chop, or run in blender, also a few seconds. Then proceed as with
spinach. "Late in the season" means that the lower part of the stems are
developing fibers, similar to linen fibers. Cloth is made from nettles in
much the same way as linen, but much softer,
closer to cotton in feel. Has probably been used that way for about 4000
years ...


Just to make sure that we are all on the same page, we are talking about
stinging nettles (Urtica dioica), right? THere are all sorts of nettles.
Nettles constitute between twenty-four and thirty-nine species of
flowering plants of the genus Urtica in the family Urticaceae, with
mainly a temperate distribution.


Urtica dioica is the one, yes, it's a perennial. Here there's also a small
annual species, Urtica urens, much rarer and also stinging.

More . . .

http://www.thekitchn.com/stinging-nettles-8-recipes-for-145582

Stinging Nettles: 8 Recipes for Spring Cooking


Thank you! Bookmarked.

(Makes my mouth hurt just thinking about it.)


Why? It's not as if they can still sting after cooking? Unlike chili peppers
that keep burning my mouth for a long time ...


This is going to require a leap of faith, but first I need to feed, and
give more water to my "Stinging Nettle" to increase its yield.
--
Remember Rachel Corrie
http://www.rachelcorrie.org/

Welcome to the New America.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hA736oK9FPg
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Old 24-06-2013, 01:33 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Eat the Weed!

Bj?rn Steensrud wrote:

: A grandchild invited herself and her sister to grandma's nettle soup. A
: little late in the season, but grandpa went out to pick the raw materials,
: grandma made spinach soup with stinging nettle instead of spinach, with
: delicious result. Also with more vitamins and other good stuff. Try it next
: spring - pick the tips before they sprout flowers! Nettle was also used as a
: source of textile fiber - in the fall, so don't wait too long to try.

How were your hands after the harvesting? I have to pull them out of my
garden and used som eold leather gloves, whihc were rotting. My hands
stung for quite a long time! It never occurred to me to eat the da-ned
things as they might do the same for my innards:-)

Wendy-just back form a vacation in chcago




  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 24-06-2013, 06:51 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 103
Default Eat the Weed!

W. Baker wrote:

Bj?rn Steensrud wrote:

: A grandchild invited herself and her sister to grandma's nettle soup. A
: little late in the season, but grandpa went out to pick the raw
: materials, grandma made spinach soup with stinging nettle instead of
: spinach, with delicious result. Also with more vitamins and other good
: stuff. Try it next spring - pick the tips before they sprout flowers!
: Nettle was also used as a source of textile fiber - in the fall, so
: don't wait too long to try.

How were your hands after the harvesting? I have to pull them out of my
garden and used som eold leather gloves, whihc were rotting. My hands
stung for quite a long time! It never occurred to me to eat the da-ned
things as they might do the same for my innards:-)

Wendy-just back form a vacation in chcago


You weren't blown away?:-)

Ordinary gardening gloves are no good, they sting right through the fabric.
I use kitchen gloves - rubber or plastic. Also, wear long-sleeved shirt and
long pants - I had to wade into a meadow not far from here to pick enough.
Two days later the city had mowed it - as it does once a year to sort of
simulate grazing.

And no, the stinging hairs collapse completely and become harmless once
soaked in boiling water. I don't know about the "venom", if any, it's
probably leached out into the water. No time to research it now, sorry

I'm lucky in that if I get stung, the pricking goes away in about 15
minutes, while my wife suffers for up to two hours, so she is very careful
or delegates the job to me.

Bjørn - about to go on vacation
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-06-2013, 05:44 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Eat the Weed!

On 06/23/2013 10:51 PM, Bjørn Steensrud wrote:
I'm lucky in that if I get stung, the pricking goes away in about 15
minutes, while my wife suffers for up to two hours, so she is very careful
or delegates the job to me.


Hi Bjørn,

My wife gets bit all the time. She uses this salve for
relief in about 30 seconds. Plants and bugs are different,
but maybe it would help your wife too.

https://www.swansonvitamins.com/dr-c...-2-oz-ointment

Vacation? Enjoy. Don't catch any fish bigger than the
ones I catch. (If you do, you are allowed to rub it in, but
only a little.)

-T


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