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Old 09-02-2013, 09:50 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

Julie Bove wrote:

: "W. Baker" wrote in message
: ...
: Julie Bove wrote:
:
: : "Todd" wrote in message
: :
: : Most commercial produce is bread for two purposes:
: : 1) to lay flat in a shipping container and 2) not
: : to rot in the container. This is one of the reasons
: : why it tastes like crap. Another reason is that
: : commercial produce is very seldom grown full circle,
: : not even organic produce. Plus commercial organic
: : produce is picked so green is bad for you.
:
: : Huh? How could produce be bread?
:
: Try bred.

: Okay. I guess that makes sense. But I think "grown" would be a better
: word. You don't really breed produce.

The seed produces do breed the plants for special charactaristics by cross
breeding two tyes of carrots to get a better one from the crossing, just
like flower breeding or making new kinds of dogs or cats. As the
gardener, if allyou are doing is planting the seeds you buy you are
growing them, but, if you plant 2 kinds you may well create a new type
(good or bad) from the seeds of the carrots plants you grow.

HS biology from back in the 1950's Do you remember the smooth and
wrinkled peas and the dihybred crosses?

Wendy

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Old 10-02-2013, 01:07 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

On 02/09/2013 12:13 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
I was referring to full circle farming. In the chicken --
out the chicken -- in the soil -- in the plant --
out the plant -- back into the chicken. Sometimes
other livestock is used.


That's generally how farming is done. Isn't it? That's the way it's done
here!


Actually no. If it is done that way where you are, it would
explain why your produce tastes good. Most commercial farms
practice monoculture and use chemicals as fertilizers.
Even the big organic farms use organic approved chemicals.
No farming the soil -- just mass production.

You are blessed to have access to great farms. I only
have access to one. We are in the high Norther Desert
and have a short growing season, so you need greenhouses
and the like to do it up well. Fortunately, I have
access to at least one community farm. I almost pass
out when I go into the tomato green house from all the
oxygen.

Most commercial produce is bread


Huh? How could produce be bread?


Me and my typos. Should have been "bred".

Everyone needs there own farmer. (I have come to
so enjoy picking my own tomatoes, peppers, and
egg plant. $2.99/lb.)


That's very expensive! Where do you live where it
costs that much? I am lucky to have Winco here where
produce is cheap.


Not for us. No Winco. We do have a Wal Mart (I
don't purchase meat or produce from them). Organic
tomatoes are between $4.99 and 5.99 per pound depending
on the time of year at Raley's and TJ's. And there
is no comparison in quality. Our store bought tomatoes
taste like crap.

I want to shop at your stores!

I have not honestly noticed too much difference between heirloom tomatoes
and regular ones as far as the taste goes


You know, if you let the hybrid ones ripen properly, they
are a real treat. I love to chop a variety of both kinds up
on a plate and drizzle with EVOO. All the different flavors.
What a treat. (You will notice that there is no cooking
involved -- that I still stink at.)

-T
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Old 10-02-2013, 01:23 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

On 02/09/2013 12:13 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Oh! Have you tried real spinach. Spinach is not flat.
Only the hybridized stuff lays flat in a shipping container.
Which is probably why is tastes like crap. The real stuff
is all crinkly. I was thinking of trying to grow some
real heirloom spinach to see how much different it tastes.
Have you tried any heirloom spiniches.


Good gravy! Some spinach is flat. Okay... Some background. Not only do I
come from a long line of farmers


The perfect person to ask! Almost all my stuff bolted on me
last year with the extra hot weather. (lost most of my purslane.)
I was thinking of this spinach for my spinach experiment:

http://www.highmowingseeds.com/Organ...d-Spinach.html

Supposedly, it has a high bolt resistance. (And does not lay flat.)
Any suggestions?

The local farm suggests that I use this compost with worm casings
and bat poop and other stuff. I used a little of it on my tomatoes
to get them gong last year. And it worked, but I only had two
weeks before the freeze came and killed everything. My few
tomatoes before hand were tasteless like store bought tomatoes
but after they were amazing. But only got two weeks worth -- rats.
Felt like crying. (Only felt like it, didn't actually do it.
wouldn't want anyone to mistake me for being "sensitive".)

Do you like this compose idea?

-T
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:49 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

On 02/08/2013 10:52 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
I have a theory (not the first to come up with it) that the
reason people avoid produce is that it tastes like crap. If you
ever manage to find a community grower, you will know what I
mean. I have to discipline myself or I'd buy everything. It
tastes so good. You really have to find one of these growers!
(Fun to feed the chickens [the "Ladies"] too. They will explain
it to you when you get there.)


Produce doesn't taste like crap.


Hi Julie,

I think you missed what I was saying. I did not mean "all" produce
tasted like crap. I meant grocery store produce, meaning commercial
monoculture growers, tastes like crap. I think CSA produce is
the seventh wonder of the world. You almost have to tie me down to
stop me from eating it!

-T
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Old 10-02-2013, 05:59 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

On 02/09/2013 05:23 PM, Todd wrote:
The local farm suggests that I use this compost with worm casings
and bat poop and other stuff. I used a little of it on my tomatoes
to get them gong last year. And it worked, but I only had two
weeks before the freeze came and killed everything. My few
tomatoes before hand were tasteless like store bought tomatoes
but after they were amazing. But only got two weeks worth -- rats.
Felt like crying. (Only felt like it, didn't actually do it.
wouldn't want anyone to mistake me for being "sensitive".)

Do you like this compose idea?


Hi Julie,

I suppose I should declare my soil conditions to you.
My soil started out as decomposed sand stone (like decomposed
granite, only uglier). I spoke with the guy that did my grading on
my property and I am 20 feet or more down from the original
surface. There was no top soil on the surface. If you hit
my dirt when it is really dry with a shovel, it throws sparks.
I have been adding compost for about five years now to my garden.
But only seriously for one year. Last year for the first time
I have earth worms.

Last year I had squash bugs and white mold on my
zucchini.

Also, with your experience at farming and knowing
I am a low carb guy (15 or less per meal), what diabetic
friendly produce would you suggest I try growing? (My
garden resides in Northern Nevada, if that helps. Has
a short growing season. Don't plant till June 1st.)

I would appreciate any suggestion you have.

Many thanks,
-T



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Old 10-02-2013, 06:12 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

On 02/09/2013 12:13 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Our produce here does not taste like crap. Funny you should
mention the name Full Circle. That's the name of the farm that I used to
get my CSA box from. But we quit getting it. There was just too much fruit
in there and we're not big fruit eaters. Well, husband is, but he wouldn't
eat what was in the box.


Hi Julie,

Sounds like your husband eats what you eat. It is a
blessing. Helps keep you on the Wagon, so to speak. My
wife does the same thing. She is a blessing is so many ways.

Do you still have any friends with chickens? Chickens,
or "The Ladies" as I call them, or "Feathered Rats" as
the community farm calls them, love anything colorful,
especially fruit. Maybe you could swap fruit for fresh
eggs? Oh my goodness, fresh organic eggs are so good!

The ladies feasted on all my organic bread when
I cleared out my pantry after my induction into the
pincushion club. I give the ladies all my carrot tops
when I purchase carrots from the community farm too.

-T

Just some small talk: a lot of folks, you excluded with your
farmer background, do not realize that "botanically speaking",
anything that is part of a plants ovum (meaning it has seeds
in it) is fruit. So no worries about not eating the overly
hybridized stuff with all the unnatural occurring carbs it is.
Cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, are all fruit -- botanically
speaking.
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Old 10-02-2013, 06:52 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?


"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Julie Bove wrote:

: "W. Baker" wrote in message
: ...
: Julie Bove wrote:
:
: : "Todd" wrote in message
: :
: : Most commercial produce is bread for two purposes:
: : 1) to lay flat in a shipping container and 2) not
: : to rot in the container. This is one of the reasons
: : why it tastes like crap. Another reason is that
: : commercial produce is very seldom grown full circle,
: : not even organic produce. Plus commercial organic
: : produce is picked so green is bad for you.
:
: : Huh? How could produce be bread?
:
: Try bred.

: Okay. I guess that makes sense. But I think "grown" would be a better
: word. You don't really breed produce.

The seed produces do breed the plants for special charactaristics by cross
breeding two tyes of carrots to get a better one from the crossing, just
like flower breeding or making new kinds of dogs or cats. As the
gardener, if allyou are doing is planting the seeds you buy you are
growing them, but, if you plant 2 kinds you may well create a new type
(good or bad) from the seeds of the carrots plants you grow.


I do know that but I just never thought of it in terms like that.

HS biology from back in the 1950's Do you remember the smooth and
wrinkled peas and the dihybred crosses?


No.



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Old 10-02-2013, 06:56 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?


"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 02/09/2013 12:13 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Oh! Have you tried real spinach. Spinach is not flat.
Only the hybridized stuff lays flat in a shipping container.
Which is probably why is tastes like crap. The real stuff
is all crinkly. I was thinking of trying to grow some
real heirloom spinach to see how much different it tastes.
Have you tried any heirloom spiniches.


Good gravy! Some spinach is flat. Okay... Some background. Not only
do I
come from a long line of farmers


The perfect person to ask! Almost all my stuff bolted on me
last year with the extra hot weather. (lost most of my purslane.)
I was thinking of this spinach for my spinach experiment:

http://www.highmowingseeds.com/Organ...d-Spinach.html

Supposedly, it has a high bolt resistance. (And does not lay flat.)
Any suggestions?

The local farm suggests that I use this compost with worm casings
and bat poop and other stuff. I used a little of it on my tomatoes
to get them gong last year. And it worked, but I only had two
weeks before the freeze came and killed everything. My few
tomatoes before hand were tasteless like store bought tomatoes
but after they were amazing. But only got two weeks worth -- rats.
Felt like crying. (Only felt like it, didn't actually do it.
wouldn't want anyone to mistake me for being "sensitive".)

Do you like this compose idea?


Chicken poop is commonly used here. Or fish fertilizer. But fertilizer
won't help with bolting. Hot weather is what causes that. But the key to
any greens is to reseed every two weeks.


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Old 10-02-2013, 06:59 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?


"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 02/09/2013 05:23 PM, Todd wrote:
The local farm suggests that I use this compost with worm casings
and bat poop and other stuff. I used a little of it on my tomatoes
to get them gong last year. And it worked, but I only had two
weeks before the freeze came and killed everything. My few
tomatoes before hand were tasteless like store bought tomatoes
but after they were amazing. But only got two weeks worth -- rats.
Felt like crying. (Only felt like it, didn't actually do it.
wouldn't want anyone to mistake me for being "sensitive".)

Do you like this compose idea?


Hi Julie,

I suppose I should declare my soil conditions to you.
My soil started out as decomposed sand stone (like decomposed
granite, only uglier). I spoke with the guy that did my grading on
my property and I am 20 feet or more down from the original
surface. There was no top soil on the surface. If you hit
my dirt when it is really dry with a shovel, it throws sparks.
I have been adding compost for about five years now to my garden.
But only seriously for one year. Last year for the first time
I have earth worms.

Last year I had squash bugs and white mold on my
zucchini.

Also, with your experience at farming and knowing
I am a low carb guy (15 or less per meal), what diabetic
friendly produce would you suggest I try growing? (My
garden resides in Northern Nevada, if that helps. Has
a short growing season. Don't plant till June 1st.)

I would appreciate any suggestion you have.

Many thanks,
-T


Sorry, but to me, all produce is diabetic friendly except perhaps some
fruits in excess amounts. I have never tried to grow anything in your
climate so I can't help you there. We're zone 7 here.


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Old 10-02-2013, 07:07 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?


"Todd" wrote in message
...
On 02/09/2013 12:13 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Our produce here does not taste like crap. Funny you should
mention the name Full Circle. That's the name of the farm that I used to
get my CSA box from. But we quit getting it. There was just too much
fruit
in there and we're not big fruit eaters. Well, husband is, but he
wouldn't
eat what was in the box.


Hi Julie,

Sounds like your husband eats what you eat. It is a
blessing. Helps keep you on the Wagon, so to speak. My
wife does the same thing. She is a blessing is so many ways.


No. He loves broccoli, asparagus, lots of fruits but just never what was in
the box. He also eats frozen treats, chips and tons of meat. When he is
home I often have to fix three different meals for dinner.

Do you still have any friends with chickens? Chickens,
or "The Ladies" as I call them, or "Feathered Rats" as
the community farm calls them, love anything colorful,
especially fruit. Maybe you could swap fruit for fresh
eggs? Oh my goodness, fresh organic eggs are so good!


Nope. And I rarely buy eggs as I can't eat them.

The ladies feasted on all my organic bread when
I cleared out my pantry after my induction into the
pincushion club. I give the ladies all my carrot tops
when I purchase carrots from the community farm too.

-T

Just some small talk: a lot of folks, you excluded with your
farmer background, do not realize that "botanically speaking",
anything that is part of a plants ovum (meaning it has seeds
in it) is fruit. So no worries about not eating the overly
hybridized stuff with all the unnatural occurring carbs it is.
Cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, are all fruit -- botanically
speaking.


I think most people do know this but they are generally referred to as
vegetables. Raw vegans say either fruit or sweet fruit. Sweet fruit being
things like bananas and pears.




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Old 12-02-2013, 10:00 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default OT (sort of): Low GI carrots for the garden?

In article , Todd
wrote:

Oh! Have you tried real spinach. Spinach is not flat.
Only the hybridized stuff lays flat in a shipping container.
Which is probably why is tastes like crap. The real stuff
is all crinkly. I was thinking of trying to grow some
real heirloom spinach to see how much different it tastes.
Have you tried any heirloom spiniches.


Actually, there are a number of varieties of spinach. Some are curlier
than others.

PP
--
"What you fail to understand is that criticising established authority by means
of argument and evidence is a crucial aspect of how science works."
- Chris Malcolm


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