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Old 04-09-2012, 12:50 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Do you eat tofu?

I use it in me smoothies!! YUM

Nana

"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
b.com...
I used to like the Chinese firm tofu (bean curd) in stir frys better than
the mushier Japanese tofu.

I have to avoid soy products now because of thyroid disease.


Yeah. Angela and I avoid soy for the same reasons. I guess I will just
try serving him some egg product instead. He didn't touch the tofu. No
sense in trying it again.




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Old 04-09-2012, 12:52 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"Nana.Wilson" wrote in message
...
I use it in me smoothies!! YUM


Now that sounds kind of weird. But whatever works for ya!


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Old 04-09-2012, 12:55 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Do you eat tofu?

In article ,
"W. Baker" wrote:

Peppermint Patootie wrote:
: In article ,
: "W. Baker" wrote:
: Peppermint Patootie wrote:
: : In article ,
: : "W. Baker" wrote:
: : If your husband like hot and sour soup, it can be made vegetarian
: : without
: : a meat broth. I don't have a recipe but had one from a package of
: : tofu
: : at
: : one time. You might try gooling for it. You can make a peppery as
: : you
: : like and that is the source of the heat for that soup.
: : I think I posted a recipe for sour-hot soup here a few months ago.
: I seem to remember that too, but I checked my recipe file but had not
: saved it. Perhaps too much pork or something like that, because I just
: love that soup!

: You can adapt it not to have any pork. Dark meat chicken would do
: great, I would think.

: PP

Since I can't find your recipe, woul you min sendign it either to the
group or to me? As the evenings are getting cooler up hee in the
mountains and today I even wore a light flannel shirt, it is time to think
of hot soups again and thatcan be a nic elow carb one if not thickened
with cornsstarch. I wonder how it would be with an egg in it as a kind of
hot and sour egg drop soup:-) kind of a mixed soupaphore.

Wendy


I'll see if I can find it. I typed it in from the book, and I'm not
looking to do that again, but if I can find it on google, I'll repost it.

PP
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Old 04-09-2012, 01:04 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Do you eat tofu?

In article
,
Peppermint Patootie wrote:

I'll see if I can find it. I typed it in from the book, and I'm not
looking to do that again, but if I can find it on google, I'll repost it.


Ah! I posted it over in alt.support.diabetes. Here it is again:

Originally posted on May 8, 2012


I'll put it just as Mme. Chao writes it and allow you to make the
changes you want. I'll have some comments of my own after the recipe.

***** Begin quoted recipe

From _How to Cook and Eat in Chinese_ by Buwei Yang Chao.

(This is the edition I grew up with:
http://www.amazon.com/cook-Chinese-B...I6VDU/ref=sr_1

_9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1336531462&sr=1-9 )

Sour-Hot Soup

This is also a very famous soup that sometimes will help you get rid of
leftovers. But sometimes we also purposely make it with fresh
materials. Whichever its origin, it is a most appetizing soup, if
properly made, and is very helpful when one is not hungry but has to
eat.

The eggs and characteristic seasoning exist in all kinds of Sour-Hot
soup. As to the other things you can ad lib; they can be fish, meat,
shrimps, bean curd, etc. Even the water itself can be replaced by
chicken soup, meat soup, made from boiling meat bones, etc.

3 eggs
7 cups water or any soup
1 teaspoon salt
2 Tablespoons soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon taste powder (omit if you use soup instead of water)
2 Tablespoons cornstarch
3 Tablespoons vinegar
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 lb of any other materials chopped in small pieces

Mix salt, soy sauce, taste powder, and cornstarch with 1 cup cold water
or soup. Then put it in 6 cups of boiling water or soup. Keep a low
fire while doing the following:

Beat 3 eggs and pour very slowly into the soup. Keep stirring the soup
while pouring the eggs. Then add in the vinegar and pepper and any
other materials. If you have meat slices, prepare them as in meat-slice
recipes before adding into the soup.

***** End quoted recipe

I usually put in Chinese "long" cabbage (aka celery cabbage -- what I
grew up knowing as "Chinese cabbage") sliced thin, cubes of firm tofu,
sliced or chunked mushrooms, lily buds (from the Asian market), and
sliced pork that I've marinated in soy sauce. (If I consumed alcohol
I'd add some dry sherry to the marinade.) I use the dark, flavorful,
more fatty pork which is sold in the Asian market as "pork shoulder
butt." That dry white stuff that Anglos eat isn't really food, to my
taste. It's more like a construction product. ;-)

I prefer the flavor of tofu which I buy in Asian markets -- preferably
taken out of a big plastic bucket and dropped into a plastic baggie,
which is then tied, but that's hard to find anymore. ;-) Nowadays most
of it is sold in plastic tubs with lids or those square plastic boxes
with clear plastic top. The kind one finds in Whole Foods and the like
doesn't have the good sour edge to the flavor, and the texture is often
too grainy. I like to age mine a bit to get a little more of the good
flavor.

"Taste powder" is MSG (aji no moto). I grew up with a tin of it in the
cupboard. My father used it in Chinese cooking, and I never developed a
reaction to it until I was an adult. Nowadays it gives me migraines, so
I never use it.

For "soy sauce" I use "light soy" from the Asian market. There's a
brand I like which is less than $2 per liter. "Dark soy" and "mushroom
soy" and many other kinds of soy are different, and you don't want them
in this recipe.

I always use a meat stock, for a fuller flavor. For me, pork.

This is about the right spiciness for me. I don't like really spicy
food, but this is good. Black pepper is a different kind of hot (to my
tongue) than all those chillies.

I find sour-hot soup is wonderful in cold weather, particularly if one
has a cold. :-)

Eat it in good health!

Priscilla
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Old 04-09-2012, 01:27 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Do you eat tofu?


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Nana.Wilson" wrote in message
...
I use it in me smoothies!! YUM


Now that sounds kind of weird. But whatever works for ya!

NAY!! You can use soy milk or yoghurt. Tofu will take on the flavour of
other things, so why not?

Nana




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Old 04-09-2012, 01:32 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Do you eat tofu?


"Nana.Wilson" wrote in message
...

"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Nana.Wilson" wrote in message
...
I use it in me smoothies!! YUM


Now that sounds kind of weird. But whatever works for ya!

NAY!! You can use soy milk or yoghurt. Tofu will take on the flavour of
other things, so why not?


Well I don't happen to like yogurt, any kind of milk, tofu or smoothies.


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Old 04-09-2012, 02:39 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Do you eat tofu?

Peppermint Patootie wrote:
: ***** Begin quoted recipe

: From _How to Cook and Eat in Chinese_ by Buwei Yang Chao.

: (This is the edition I grew up with:
: http://www.amazon.com/cook-Chinese-B...I6VDU/ref=sr_1
:
: _9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1336531462&sr=1-9 )

: Sour-Hot Soup

: This is also a very famous soup that sometimes will help you get rid of
: leftovers. But sometimes we also purposely make it with fresh
: materials. Whichever its origin, it is a most appetizing soup, if
: properly made, and is very helpful when one is not hungry but has to
: eat.

: The eggs and characteristic seasoning exist in all kinds of Sour-Hot
: soup. As to the other things you can ad lib; they can be fish, meat,
: shrimps, bean curd, etc. Even the water itself can be replaced by
: chicken soup, meat soup, made from boiling meat bones, etc.

: 3 eggs
: 7 cups water or any soup
: 1 teaspoon salt
: 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
: 1/2 teaspoon taste powder (omit if you use soup instead of water)
: 2 Tablespoons cornstarch
: 3 Tablespoons vinegar
: 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
: 1/2 lb of any other materials chopped in small pieces

: Mix salt, soy sauce, taste powder, and cornstarch with 1 cup cold water
: or soup. Then put it in 6 cups of boiling water or soup. Keep a low
: fire while doing the following:

: Beat 3 eggs and pour very slowly into the soup. Keep stirring the soup
: while pouring the eggs. Then add in the vinegar and pepper and any
: other materials. If you have meat slices, prepare them as in meat-slice
: recipes before adding into the soup.

: ***** End quoted recipe

: I usually put in Chinese "long" cabbage (aka celery cabbage -- what I
: grew up knowing as "Chinese cabbage") sliced thin, cubes of firm tofu,
: sliced or chunked mushrooms, lily buds (from the Asian market), and
: sliced pork that I've marinated in soy sauce. (If I consumed alcohol
: I'd add some dry sherry to the marinade.) I use the dark, flavorful,
: more fatty pork which is sold in the Asian market as "pork shoulder
: butt." That dry white stuff that Anglos eat isn't really food, to my
: taste. It's more like a construction product. ;-)

: I prefer the flavor of tofu which I buy in Asian markets -- preferably
: taken out of a big plastic bucket and dropped into a plastic baggie,
: which is then tied, but that's hard to find anymore. ;-) Nowadays most
: of it is sold in plastic tubs with lids or those square plastic boxes
: with clear plastic top. The kind one finds in Whole Foods and the like
: doesn't have the good sour edge to the flavor, and the texture is often
: too grainy. I like to age mine a bit to get a little more of the good
: flavor.

: "Taste powder" is MSG (aji no moto). I grew up with a tin of it in the
: cupboard. My father used it in Chinese cooking, and I never developed a
: reaction to it until I was an adult. Nowadays it gives me migraines, so
: I never use it.

: For "soy sauce" I use "light soy" from the Asian market. There's a
: brand I like which is less than $2 per liter. "Dark soy" and "mushroom
: soy" and many other kinds of soy are different, and you don't want them
: in this recipe.

: I always use a meat stock, for a fuller flavor. For me, pork.

: This is about the right spiciness for me. I don't like really spicy
: food, but this is good. Black pepper is a different kind of hot (to my
: tongue) than all those chillies.

: I find sour-hot soup is wonderful in cold weather, particularly if one
: has a cold. :-)

: Eat it in good health!

: Priscilla

thanks Priscilla,

have you ever tried it without the cornsarch? It would seem to me that
with the eggs it might not need so much thickening. In the restaurant
where I have had this soup there generally are no eggs, hence my thought.
I may well be used to it rather thinner than this recipe sounds.

Of sourse, I am eating New York Hot and Sour soup, which may well vary
from the Chinese version, as do so many dishes, includign all those
chicken dishes which we get with bneleses chicken, while , from what I
gahter, teh chinese prefer bone-in hacked chicken and like to
suck onthe bones for flavor.

Wendy
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Old 04-09-2012, 02:51 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Do you eat tofu?


"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Peppermint Patootie wrote:
: ***** Begin quoted recipe

: From _How to Cook and Eat in Chinese_ by Buwei Yang Chao.

: (This is the edition I grew up with:
:
http://www.amazon.com/cook-Chinese-B...I6VDU/ref=sr_1
:
: _9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1336531462&sr=1-9 )

: Sour-Hot Soup

: This is also a very famous soup that sometimes will help you get rid of
: leftovers. But sometimes we also purposely make it with fresh
: materials. Whichever its origin, it is a most appetizing soup, if
: properly made, and is very helpful when one is not hungry but has to
: eat.

: The eggs and characteristic seasoning exist in all kinds of Sour-Hot
: soup. As to the other things you can ad lib; they can be fish, meat,
: shrimps, bean curd, etc. Even the water itself can be replaced by
: chicken soup, meat soup, made from boiling meat bones, etc.

: 3 eggs
: 7 cups water or any soup
: 1 teaspoon salt
: 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
: 1/2 teaspoon taste powder (omit if you use soup instead of water)
: 2 Tablespoons cornstarch
: 3 Tablespoons vinegar
: 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
: 1/2 lb of any other materials chopped in small pieces

: Mix salt, soy sauce, taste powder, and cornstarch with 1 cup cold water
: or soup. Then put it in 6 cups of boiling water or soup. Keep a low
: fire while doing the following:

: Beat 3 eggs and pour very slowly into the soup. Keep stirring the soup
: while pouring the eggs. Then add in the vinegar and pepper and any
: other materials. If you have meat slices, prepare them as in meat-slice
: recipes before adding into the soup.

: ***** End quoted recipe

: I usually put in Chinese "long" cabbage (aka celery cabbage -- what I
: grew up knowing as "Chinese cabbage") sliced thin, cubes of firm tofu,
: sliced or chunked mushrooms, lily buds (from the Asian market), and
: sliced pork that I've marinated in soy sauce. (If I consumed alcohol
: I'd add some dry sherry to the marinade.) I use the dark, flavorful,
: more fatty pork which is sold in the Asian market as "pork shoulder
: butt." That dry white stuff that Anglos eat isn't really food, to my
: taste. It's more like a construction product. ;-)

: I prefer the flavor of tofu which I buy in Asian markets -- preferably
: taken out of a big plastic bucket and dropped into a plastic baggie,
: which is then tied, but that's hard to find anymore. ;-) Nowadays most
: of it is sold in plastic tubs with lids or those square plastic boxes
: with clear plastic top. The kind one finds in Whole Foods and the like
: doesn't have the good sour edge to the flavor, and the texture is often
: too grainy. I like to age mine a bit to get a little more of the good
: flavor.

: "Taste powder" is MSG (aji no moto). I grew up with a tin of it in the
: cupboard. My father used it in Chinese cooking, and I never developed a
: reaction to it until I was an adult. Nowadays it gives me migraines, so
: I never use it.

: For "soy sauce" I use "light soy" from the Asian market. There's a
: brand I like which is less than $2 per liter. "Dark soy" and "mushroom
: soy" and many other kinds of soy are different, and you don't want them
: in this recipe.

: I always use a meat stock, for a fuller flavor. For me, pork.

: This is about the right spiciness for me. I don't like really spicy
: food, but this is good. Black pepper is a different kind of hot (to my
: tongue) than all those chillies.

: I find sour-hot soup is wonderful in cold weather, particularly if one
: has a cold. :-)

: Eat it in good health!

: Priscilla

thanks Priscilla,

have you ever tried it without the cornsarch? It would seem to me that
with the eggs it might not need so much thickening. In the restaurant
where I have had this soup there generally are no eggs, hence my thought.
I may well be used to it rather thinner than this recipe sounds.

Of sourse, I am eating New York Hot and Sour soup, which may well vary
from the Chinese version, as do so many dishes, includign all those
chicken dishes which we get with bneleses chicken, while , from what I
gahter, teh chinese prefer bone-in hacked chicken and like to
suck onthe bones for flavor.


When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids loved
them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese? I
thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-09-2012, 04:25 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 408
Default Do you eat tofu?

In article ,
"W. Baker" wrote:

Peppermint Patootie wrote:
: ***** Begin quoted recipe

: From _How to Cook and Eat in Chinese_ by Buwei Yang Chao.

: (This is the edition I grew up with:
: http://www.amazon.com/cook-Chinese-B...I6VDU/ref=sr_1
:
: _9?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1336531462&sr=1-9 )

: Sour-Hot Soup

: This is also a very famous soup that sometimes will help you get rid of
: leftovers. But sometimes we also purposely make it with fresh
: materials. Whichever its origin, it is a most appetizing soup, if
: properly made, and is very helpful when one is not hungry but has to
: eat.

: The eggs and characteristic seasoning exist in all kinds of Sour-Hot
: soup. As to the other things you can ad lib; they can be fish, meat,
: shrimps, bean curd, etc. Even the water itself can be replaced by
: chicken soup, meat soup, made from boiling meat bones, etc.

: 3 eggs
: 7 cups water or any soup
: 1 teaspoon salt
: 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
: 1/2 teaspoon taste powder (omit if you use soup instead of water)
: 2 Tablespoons cornstarch
: 3 Tablespoons vinegar
: 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
: 1/2 lb of any other materials chopped in small pieces

: Mix salt, soy sauce, taste powder, and cornstarch with 1 cup cold water
: or soup. Then put it in 6 cups of boiling water or soup. Keep a low
: fire while doing the following:

: Beat 3 eggs and pour very slowly into the soup. Keep stirring the soup
: while pouring the eggs. Then add in the vinegar and pepper and any
: other materials. If you have meat slices, prepare them as in meat-slice
: recipes before adding into the soup.

: ***** End quoted recipe

: I usually put in Chinese "long" cabbage (aka celery cabbage -- what I
: grew up knowing as "Chinese cabbage") sliced thin, cubes of firm tofu,
: sliced or chunked mushrooms, lily buds (from the Asian market), and
: sliced pork that I've marinated in soy sauce. (If I consumed alcohol
: I'd add some dry sherry to the marinade.) I use the dark, flavorful,
: more fatty pork which is sold in the Asian market as "pork shoulder
: butt." That dry white stuff that Anglos eat isn't really food, to my
: taste. It's more like a construction product. ;-)

: I prefer the flavor of tofu which I buy in Asian markets -- preferably
: taken out of a big plastic bucket and dropped into a plastic baggie,
: which is then tied, but that's hard to find anymore. ;-) Nowadays most
: of it is sold in plastic tubs with lids or those square plastic boxes
: with clear plastic top. The kind one finds in Whole Foods and the like
: doesn't have the good sour edge to the flavor, and the texture is often
: too grainy. I like to age mine a bit to get a little more of the good
: flavor.

: "Taste powder" is MSG (aji no moto). I grew up with a tin of it in the
: cupboard. My father used it in Chinese cooking, and I never developed a
: reaction to it until I was an adult. Nowadays it gives me migraines, so
: I never use it.

: For "soy sauce" I use "light soy" from the Asian market. There's a
: brand I like which is less than $2 per liter. "Dark soy" and "mushroom
: soy" and many other kinds of soy are different, and you don't want them
: in this recipe.

: I always use a meat stock, for a fuller flavor. For me, pork.

: This is about the right spiciness for me. I don't like really spicy
: food, but this is good. Black pepper is a different kind of hot (to my
: tongue) than all those chillies.

: I find sour-hot soup is wonderful in cold weather, particularly if one
: has a cold. :-)

: Eat it in good health!

: Priscilla

thanks Priscilla,

have you ever tried it without the cornsarch? It would seem to me that
with the eggs it might not need so much thickening. In the restaurant
where I have had this soup there generally are no eggs, hence my thought.
I may well be used to it rather thinner than this recipe sounds.

Of sourse, I am eating New York Hot and Sour soup, which may well vary
from the Chinese version, as do so many dishes, includign all those
chicken dishes which we get with bneleses chicken, while , from what I
gahter, teh chinese prefer bone-in hacked chicken and like to
suck onthe bones for flavor.

Wendy


I'm sure I have. I usually make some variation on it these days, making
a big soup with lots of stuff and then seasoning it with pepper and
vinegar.

PP
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Old 04-09-2012, 04:33 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Do you eat tofu?

In article ,
"Julie Bove" wrote:

When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids loved
them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese? I
thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.


Japanese. Don't you see it in Japanese restaurants?

One way to figure out if something is Japanese or Chinese is look at the
number of syllables in the words. If there is more than one syllable,
it's probably Japanese. If it's all words of one syllable, chances are
it's Chinese. Korean can go either way.

Hence:

teriyaki = Japanese (see also words ending in -yaki, -nabe, etc.)
shumai = Japanese

mu shu gai pan (moo shoo guy pan) = Chinese (chicken stirfry
w/mushrooms)
bao bing (bow bing) = Chinese (pancakes for mu shu ro)
won ton = Chinese

bulgogi = Korean
kimchee or kim chi (fermented cabbage) = Korean

Priscilla


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Old 04-09-2012, 04:34 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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mu shu gai pan (moo shoo guy pan) = Chinese (chicken stirfry
w/mushrooms)


Correction: mu gu gai pan
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Old 04-09-2012, 04:59 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"Peppermint Patootie" wrote in message
...
In article ,
"Julie Bove" wrote:

When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids
loved
them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese?
I
thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.


Japanese. Don't you see it in Japanese restaurants?


No. I don't see it because I don't go to Japanese restaurants. Or Chinese.

One way to figure out if something is Japanese or Chinese is look at the
number of syllables in the words. If there is more than one syllable,
it's probably Japanese. If it's all words of one syllable, chances are
it's Chinese. Korean can go either way.


Okay.

Hence:

teriyaki = Japanese (see also words ending in -yaki, -nabe, etc.)
shumai = Japanese

mu shu gai pan (moo shoo guy pan) = Chinese (chicken stirfry
w/mushrooms)
bao bing (bow bing) = Chinese (pancakes for mu shu ro)
won ton = Chinese

bulgogi = Korean
kimchee or kim chi (fermented cabbage) = Korean


Okay.


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Old 04-09-2012, 04:43 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Julie Bove wrote:


: When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids loved
: them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even Chinese? I
: thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.

Teriyaki is Japanese and quite sweet so I don't make it, although it can
be quite simple IIRC, soysaouse, sine and, honey(I believe, seasoned with
ginger and used as a maraade adn sauce for a number of foods. No reason
not to use it on pieces of chicken, boneless or not.

Not terrible diabetic friendly:-(


Wendy

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Old 04-09-2012, 04:47 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Julie Bove wrote:


: When we lived in NY we used to get Teriyaki chicken sticks. The kids
loved
: them. I don't think they're authentic at all. Is Teriyaki even
Chinese? I
: thought it was Japanese but I could be wrong.

Teriyaki is Japanese and quite sweet so I don't make it, although it can
be quite simple IIRC, soysaouse, sine and, honey(I believe, seasoned with
ginger and used as a maraade adn sauce for a number of foods. No reason
not to use it on pieces of chicken, boneless or not.

Not terrible diabetic friendly:-(


I've never eaten it. It smells vile to me.


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Old 04-09-2012, 04:48 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Peppermint Patootie wrote:
: In article ,
: Nick Cramer wrote:

: Un has used it in soups, noodle and Thai curry dishes for me. She's added
: fish, chicken, pork, daikon, bok choi and of course, garlic, mushroom,
: ginger, hot peppers, etc. It seems to absorb the flavors of what it's
: cooked with.

: I grew up eating tofu, and when I was a kid it was somewhat exotic. We
: had to buy it (out of a bucket) from the back of an Asian gift store on
: Broadway or go down to Chinatown. We never dreamed of growing up in a
: world in which we could buy it in most supermarkets.

: I have a tub in my fridge right now. I use it in stirfries, sour-hot
: soup, pork soup with cabbage, and so on.

: PP
: --
: "What you fail to understand is that criticising established authority by means
: of argument and evidence is a crucial aspect of how science works."
: - Chris Malcolm

I remember getting that both at Fairay and at the small Korean produce adn
a few other things stores that were so common in my earlier married days.
they seem to all have disappeared. I guess that first generation that
ran these store is now retired anad the kids have all gone to college and
have other kinds of jobs now.

I also miss that tofu. I think it kind of hung together better.

Wendy


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