Diabetic (alt.food.diabetic) This group is for the discussion of controlled-portion eating plans for the dietary management of diabetes.

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Old 30-10-2004, 10:29 PM
Ted Rosenberg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Halloween Tips for Parents & Kids

Why what an excellent post!

Gumbo wrote:
Halloween Tips for Parents & Kids

----------------------------------------------------------------------------
----

For many families, October brings thoughts of witches, ghosts, and goblins.
Not to mention candy, gooey treats and parties! For families living with
diabetes, Halloween presents entirely different issues. As a parent of a
child with diabetes, you may wonder whether your child can participate in
Halloween activities.

There's no reason that having diabetes should interfere with having
Halloween fun. Here are a few tips for a safe and happy Halloween for both
you and your child.

a.. The best part of Halloween is the "dressing up." Put extra effort
into your child's costume. Get the whole family involved.


b.. Plan a party on Halloween night. That way, friends and family can get
together AND you can plan a healthy menu.


c.. Go to a Halloween activity in the community such as a haunted house,
hayride or bonfire.


d.. There's no reason not to allow your child with diabetes to go
trick-or-treating. Just take some age-appropriate measures to ensure her
safety (both with diabetes, and in general!). Younger children should
always trick-or-treat with a parent. Older kids can often go with friends
or siblings, depending on where you live. If you think your older child
might need to check his blood glucose while he's out, remind him before he
goes or ask him to wear a cell phone or pager. (His testing supplies may not
"wear well" with his costume and you may want to make arrangements to meet
him for a quick check en route.)


e.. Kids with diabetes can have treats. Of course, the rule is moderation
with foods high in carbohydrate (including sweets and starches). Suggest
that your child select a few favorite treats and trade the rest in for a
present or money.


f.. If your children do eat candy, remember to check the carbohydrate in
their meal plan, check their blood glucose and plan for more activity to
help counteract any elevated blood glucose levels. Checking blood glucose
levels helps to teach the lesson that candy causes elevations in blood
glucose. Kids do want to have blood glucose numbers in normal ranges! They
feel better!


g.. A little extra physical activity on Halloween and the following days
may allow your child to have some Halloween treats without taking extra
insulin. Talk to your doctor, diabetes educator, or dietitian about how to
work these treats into her meal plan safely.


h.. Substitute candy with treats lower in carbohydrate. At home, you can
pass out toys and trinkets, like false teeth, super balls, "slime,"
necklaces, temporary tattoos, etc. Kids often like these more than candy
anyway! Visit your local dime store or go to an online toy vendor to stock
up!



i.. Remember that candy has a long shelf-life. You can keep some of your
child's favorites for him or her to enjoy at other times. Put some in the
freezer or refrigerator too.


j.. Treats low in fat can be used to treat lows throughout the year.
Chocolate and other higher-fat treats don't work well for treating lows,
though, as the fat slows the progress of glucose into the blood stream.
Stick to hard candies, gum drops, lollipops, and the like.


k.. Have a ghostly good time!




--
"...in addition to being foreign territory the past is, as history, a
hall of mirrors that reflect the needs of souls observing from the present"
Glen Cook

  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-10-2004, 11:15 PM
Tiger Lily
 
Posts: n/a
Default

the "Halloween Goblin" comes to our house to collect/buy whatever halloween
candy that the kidlet chooses to leave for the Goblin

being as the Goblin has been known to leave $5 for candy, the kid is
generous!

the kid has had years where the Goblin only leaves $1 for his efforts.......
his efforts have been MUCH better since THAT year!

the 'Goblin's' candy goes to work to help all those people who needs the
candy like a whole in the head too...... lol

kate
--
Join us in the Diabetic-Talk Chatroom on UnderNet
/server irc.undernet.org --- /join #Diabetic-Talk
More info: http://www.diabetic-talk.org/

"Ted Rosenberg" wrote in message
...
Why what an excellent post!

Gumbo wrote:
Halloween Tips for Parents & Kids


--------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
----

For many families, October brings thoughts of witches, ghosts, and

goblins.
Not to mention candy, gooey treats and parties! For families living

with
diabetes, Halloween presents entirely different issues. As a parent of a
child with diabetes, you may wonder whether your child can participate

in
Halloween activities.

There's no reason that having diabetes should interfere with having
Halloween fun. Here are a few tips for a safe and happy Halloween for

both
you and your child.

a.. The best part of Halloween is the "dressing up." Put extra effort
into your child's costume. Get the whole family involved.


b.. Plan a party on Halloween night. That way, friends and family can

get
together AND you can plan a healthy menu.


c.. Go to a Halloween activity in the community such as a haunted

house,
hayride or bonfire.


d.. There's no reason not to allow your child with diabetes to go
trick-or-treating. Just take some age-appropriate measures to ensure

her
safety (both with diabetes, and in general!). Younger children should
always trick-or-treat with a parent. Older kids can often go with

friends
or siblings, depending on where you live. If you think your older child
might need to check his blood glucose while he's out, remind him before

he
goes or ask him to wear a cell phone or pager. (His testing supplies may

not
"wear well" with his costume and you may want to make arrangements to

meet
him for a quick check en route.)


e.. Kids with diabetes can have treats. Of course, the rule is

moderation
with foods high in carbohydrate (including sweets and starches). Suggest
that your child select a few favorite treats and trade the rest in for a
present or money.


f.. If your children do eat candy, remember to check the carbohydrate

in
their meal plan, check their blood glucose and plan for more activity to
help counteract any elevated blood glucose levels. Checking blood

glucose
levels helps to teach the lesson that candy causes elevations in blood
glucose. Kids do want to have blood glucose numbers in normal ranges!

They
feel better!


g.. A little extra physical activity on Halloween and the following

days
may allow your child to have some Halloween treats without taking extra
insulin. Talk to your doctor, diabetes educator, or dietitian about how

to
work these treats into her meal plan safely.


h.. Substitute candy with treats lower in carbohydrate. At home, you

can
pass out toys and trinkets, like false teeth, super balls, "slime,"
necklaces, temporary tattoos, etc. Kids often like these more than candy
anyway! Visit your local dime store or go to an online toy vendor to

stock
up!



i.. Remember that candy has a long shelf-life. You can keep some of

your
child's favorites for him or her to enjoy at other times. Put some in

the
freezer or refrigerator too.


j.. Treats low in fat can be used to treat lows throughout the year.
Chocolate and other higher-fat treats don't work well for treating lows,
though, as the fat slows the progress of glucose into the blood stream.
Stick to hard candies, gum drops, lollipops, and the like.


k.. Have a ghostly good time!




--
"...in addition to being foreign territory the past is, as history, a
hall of mirrors that reflect the needs of souls observing from the

present"
Glen Cook



  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 30-10-2004, 11:15 PM
Tiger Lily
 
Posts: n/a
Default

the "Halloween Goblin" comes to our house to collect/buy whatever halloween
candy that the kidlet chooses to leave for the Goblin

being as the Goblin has been known to leave $5 for candy, the kid is
generous!

the kid has had years where the Goblin only leaves $1 for his efforts.......
his efforts have been MUCH better since THAT year!

the 'Goblin's' candy goes to work to help all those people who needs the
candy like a whole in the head too...... lol

kate
--
Join us in the Diabetic-Talk Chatroom on UnderNet
/server irc.undernet.org --- /join #Diabetic-Talk
More info: http://www.diabetic-talk.org/

"Ted Rosenberg" wrote in message
...
Why what an excellent post!

Gumbo wrote:
Halloween Tips for Parents & Kids


--------------------------------------------------------------------------

--
----

For many families, October brings thoughts of witches, ghosts, and

goblins.
Not to mention candy, gooey treats and parties! For families living

with
diabetes, Halloween presents entirely different issues. As a parent of a
child with diabetes, you may wonder whether your child can participate

in
Halloween activities.

There's no reason that having diabetes should interfere with having
Halloween fun. Here are a few tips for a safe and happy Halloween for

both
you and your child.

a.. The best part of Halloween is the "dressing up." Put extra effort
into your child's costume. Get the whole family involved.


b.. Plan a party on Halloween night. That way, friends and family can

get
together AND you can plan a healthy menu.


c.. Go to a Halloween activity in the community such as a haunted

house,
hayride or bonfire.


d.. There's no reason not to allow your child with diabetes to go
trick-or-treating. Just take some age-appropriate measures to ensure

her
safety (both with diabetes, and in general!). Younger children should
always trick-or-treat with a parent. Older kids can often go with

friends
or siblings, depending on where you live. If you think your older child
might need to check his blood glucose while he's out, remind him before

he
goes or ask him to wear a cell phone or pager. (His testing supplies may

not
"wear well" with his costume and you may want to make arrangements to

meet
him for a quick check en route.)


e.. Kids with diabetes can have treats. Of course, the rule is

moderation
with foods high in carbohydrate (including sweets and starches). Suggest
that your child select a few favorite treats and trade the rest in for a
present or money.


f.. If your children do eat candy, remember to check the carbohydrate

in
their meal plan, check their blood glucose and plan for more activity to
help counteract any elevated blood glucose levels. Checking blood

glucose
levels helps to teach the lesson that candy causes elevations in blood
glucose. Kids do want to have blood glucose numbers in normal ranges!

They
feel better!


g.. A little extra physical activity on Halloween and the following

days
may allow your child to have some Halloween treats without taking extra
insulin. Talk to your doctor, diabetes educator, or dietitian about how

to
work these treats into her meal plan safely.


h.. Substitute candy with treats lower in carbohydrate. At home, you

can
pass out toys and trinkets, like false teeth, super balls, "slime,"
necklaces, temporary tattoos, etc. Kids often like these more than candy
anyway! Visit your local dime store or go to an online toy vendor to

stock
up!



i.. Remember that candy has a long shelf-life. You can keep some of

your
child's favorites for him or her to enjoy at other times. Put some in

the
freezer or refrigerator too.


j.. Treats low in fat can be used to treat lows throughout the year.
Chocolate and other higher-fat treats don't work well for treating lows,
though, as the fat slows the progress of glucose into the blood stream.
Stick to hard candies, gum drops, lollipops, and the like.


k.. Have a ghostly good time!




--
"...in addition to being foreign territory the past is, as history, a
hall of mirrors that reflect the needs of souls observing from the

present"
Glen Cook





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