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Old 10-01-2012, 01:32 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On Mon, 09 Jan 2012 18:02:09 -0500, Peppermint Patootie
wrote:

In article ,
Evelyn wrote:

I just came from the vet. My gorgeous male German Shepherd, only 5
yrs old, is nearly crippled due to bad hips and elbows. It was
recommended that I go and see an animal orthopedic specialist an hour
away from here.

The dog is a wonderful pet, superb temperament, obedient, well
behaved, trustworthy with people, cats and kids of all ages, not to
mention that he is absolutely one of the most gorgeous black and red
shepherds I have ever seen or lived with. He's truly magnificent.

This promises to be a real problem.

They sent us home with anti inflammatories and pain killers. Not a
good scenario.......


I'm so sorry! He sounds like a wonderful creature.

Do you give him fish oil? It's such a good anti-inflamatory for people.

PP



Yes. Every day for years.

Evelyn

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Old 10-01-2012, 06:59 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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On 1/9/2012 4:58 PM, Susan wrote:
The vet, once again today on the phone, recommended against ultra sound
or anything else stressful because the treatment she'd recommend would
be the same no matter what: Prednisone. I'm not completely comfortable
with it, fearing the worst, but may have to if he flares up again.

Right now he's fine, but I'll have the Prednisone on hand. If it gets
by him in a cheddar cheese cube, we can use it if he gets bad again. If
it doesn't... :-(

Susan




keep hope Susan

i had a small dog that was rough housing with a beagle oh, 5 times her size

the beagle put her paw on the small dog to STOP IT for a minute or second

the beagle wasn't being nasty or rough or out of line

unfortunately the small dog ruptured a disc

steroids, pain killers, gravol and special easy to eat foods solved the
problem over time........ along with a lot of 'patterning' to maintain
her mobility

the vet didn't think she would ever walk again

she walked like a drunken sailor on her next visit

he suggested a doggie trailer/wheelchair ?? dunno what to call it

we looked into that and continued the patterning

the next visit, she had some slippage, but was walking close to normally

the vet said he had NEVER seen a recovery like that and if i hadn't
brought her in, he would never have believed it

she regained 'close to normal' walking capabilities, but we were ever
watchful for her over doing things......... or getting too bossy with
the beagle again!

kate
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:22 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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BlueBrooke wrote:
: On Tue, 10 Jan 2012 10:05:15 +1000, "Ozgirl"
: wrote:

: There are more ways than one one out of their misery without death.

: Must be another one of those cultural things. That's exactly what
: "putting them out of their misery" means to every vet I've ever been
: to.

I would agree here. I have never, in 75 years hear that expression
meanign anything but putting the animal down killing it, , etc. I have
never heard it to mean relieving its pain or any such thing , butonly
causing its death.

Perhaps in oz it has some other meaning that can be found in soe
dictionaries, but it is not found in use in the US as anyting but
euthanizing, or painless , prompt death.

Wendy


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On 1/10/2012 3:30 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
You can KF by NG? I can't!


oh, use Thunderbird, you can set filters to different groups

having said that, check the headers on PP's posts to see what viewer she
is using

kate
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Old 11-01-2012, 01:09 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"BlueBrooke" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 10 Jan 2012 10:05:15 +1000, "Ozgirl"
wrote:

There are more ways than one one out of their misery without death.


Must be another one of those cultural things. That's exactly what
"putting them out of their misery" means to every vet I've ever been
to.


Doesn't anyone here have a dictionary? Or able to understand context? If
you were "miserable" with the flu what would you like to have to rid
yourself of the misery?



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Old 11-01-2012, 01:34 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"KROM" wrote in message
...
sorry ozgirl but "put it out of its misery" has always meant to kill
it here and I've heard it used in UK movies in the euthanize context.

put "what does put it out of its misery mean?" into a Google search
bar and see the result.

its very easy to take something a person says wrong..so lets be
careful when taking a idiom wrong in others because we will eventually
do it ourselves.

KROM


In my country an ass is not a butt. Should I take Americans literally
when they say ass? I accept what Americans use in that context, can it
be possible that Americans can accept different word/phrase usages from
others? Especially when the context was there, i.e. followed by a list
of possible ways to relieve said misery. Instead of a call of Ozgirl
suggests I kill my cat! How about, Ozgirl, are you saying I should kill
my cat? Nope, kangaroo trial instead. Tolerance for differences at its
best, but yet... the phrase means more than just to kill even in
America. Not my problem if people in here haven't experienced it. Not my
problem that people refuse to check it into properly. Google: "define:
put out of misery".

"http://www.writersevents.com/Words_Starting_with_P/put_ones_foot_down_put_something_together/put_someone_or_something_out_of_their_misery_defin ition.html
Idiom: put someone or something out of their misery
To ****relieve them***** from their physical suffering or their mental
anguish.
To kill (an animal that is in great pain)." (American)

"http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/put-sb-out-of-their-misery
to stop someone worrying, usually by giving them information that they
have been waiting for" (British)

"http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/put+someone+out+of+his+or+her+misery
Kill a wounded or suffering animal or person, as in When a horse breaks
a leg, there is nothing to do but put it out of its misery . [Late
1700s]

End someone's feeling of suspense, as in Tell them who won the
tournament; put them out of their misery . [c. 1920] *******Both usages
employ put out of in the sense of "extricate" or "free from."********"
(American)

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/put+out+of+misery
Put (one) out of (one's) misery
1. Euph. Fig. to kill someone as an act of mercy. Why doesn't the doctor
simply put her out of her misery? He took pills to put himself out of
his misery.
2. Fig. to end a suspenseful situation for someone. Please, put me out
of misery; what happened? I put her out of her misery and told her how
the movie ended.
See also: misery, out, put
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of ****************American Idioms*************
and Phrasal Verbs. 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Anyone still want to tell me the phase ONLY means to euthanise?



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Old 11-01-2012, 01:56 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Ozgirl wrote:
"KROM" wrote in message
...
sorry ozgirl but "put it out of its misery" has always meant to kill
it here and I've heard it used in UK movies in the euthanize context.

put "what does put it out of its misery mean?" into a Google search
bar and see the result.

its very easy to take something a person says wrong..so lets be
careful when taking a idiom wrong in others because we will
eventually do it ourselves.

KROM


In my country an ass is not a butt. Should I take Americans literally
when they say ass? I accept what Americans use in that context, can it
be possible that Americans can accept different word/phrase usages
from others? Especially when the context was there, i.e. followed by
a list of possible ways to relieve said misery. Instead of a call of
Ozgirl suggests I kill my cat! How about, Ozgirl, are you saying I
should kill my cat? Nope, kangaroo trial instead. Tolerance for
differences at its best, but yet... the phrase means more than just
to kill even in America. Not my problem if people in here haven't
experienced it. Not my problem that people refuse to check it into
properly. Google: "define: put out of misery".

"http://www.writersevents.com/Words_Starting_with_P/put_ones_foot_down_put_something_together/put_someone_or_something_out_of_their_misery_defin ition.html
Idiom: put someone or something out of their misery
To ****relieve them***** from their physical suffering or their mental
anguish.
To kill (an animal that is in great pain)." (American)

"http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/put-sb-out-of-their-misery
to stop someone worrying, usually by giving them information that they
have been waiting for" (British)

"http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/put+someone+out+of+his+or+her+misery
Kill a wounded or suffering animal or person, as in When a horse
breaks a leg, there is nothing to do but put it out of its misery .
[Late 1700s]

End someone's feeling of suspense, as in Tell them who won the
tournament; put them out of their misery . [c. 1920] *******Both
usages employ put out of in the sense of "extricate" or "free
from."********" (American)

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/put+out+of+misery
Put (one) out of (one's) misery
1. Euph. Fig. to kill someone as an act of mercy. Why doesn't the
doctor simply put her out of her misery? He took pills to put himself
out of his misery.
2. Fig. to end a suspenseful situation for someone. Please, put me out
of misery; what happened? I put her out of her misery and told her how
the movie ended.
See also: misery, out, put
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of ****************American Idioms*************
and Phrasal Verbs. 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Anyone still want to tell me the phase ONLY means to euthanise?


I knew what you meant. But then I am sad and pathetic according to the
dogpilers. So most likely what I think means nothing. Right


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Old 11-01-2012, 02:41 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Ozgirl wrote:


: "KROM" wrote in message
: ...
: sorry ozgirl but "put it out of its misery" has always meant to kill
: it here and I've heard it used in UK movies in the euthanize context.
:
: put "what does put it out of its misery mean?" into a Google search
: bar and see the result.
:
: its very easy to take something a person says wrong..so lets be
: careful when taking a idiom wrong in others because we will eventually
: do it ourselves.
:
: KROM

: In my country an ass is not a butt. Should I take Americans literally
: when they say ass? I accept what Americans use in that context, can it
: be possible that Americans can accept different word/phrase usages from
: others? Especially when the context was there, i.e. followed by a list
: of possible ways to relieve said misery. Instead of a call of Ozgirl
: suggests I kill my cat! How about, Ozgirl, are you saying I should kill
: my cat? Nope, kangaroo trial instead. Tolerance for differences at its
: best, but yet... the phrase means more than just to kill even in
: America. Not my problem if people in here haven't experienced it. Not my
: problem that people refuse to check it into properly. Google: "define:
: put out of misery".

: "http://www.writersevents.com/Words_Starting_with_P/put_ones_foot_down_put_something_together/put_someone_or_something_out_of_their_misery_defin ition.html
: Idiom: put someone or something out of their misery
: To ****relieve them***** from their physical suffering or their mental
: anguish.
: To kill (an animal that is in great pain)." (American)

: "http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/put-sb-out-of-their-misery
: to stop someone worrying, usually by giving them information that they
: have been waiting for" (British)

: "http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/put+someone+out+of+his+or+her+misery
: Kill a wounded or suffering animal or person, as in When a horse breaks
: a leg, there is nothing to do but put it out of its misery . [Late
: 1700s]

: End someone's feeling of suspense, as in Tell them who won the
: tournament; put them out of their misery . [c. 1920] *******Both usages
: employ put out of in the sense of "extricate" or "free from."********"
: (American)

: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/put+out+of+misery
: Put (one) out of (one's) misery
: 1. Euph. Fig. to kill someone as an act of mercy. Why doesn't the doctor
: simply put her out of her misery? He took pills to put himself out of
: his misery.
: 2. Fig. to end a suspenseful situation for someone. Please, put me out
: of misery; what happened? I put her out of her misery and told her how
: the movie ended.
: See also: misery, out, put
: McGraw-Hill Dictionary of ****************American Idioms*************
: and Phrasal Verbs. ? 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

: Anyone still want to tell me the phase ONLY means to euthanise?

:

A number of us simultainiously were astounded to hear that there was
another meaning for a phrase we had all only heard s meaning to put down
or wthenize n animal. We all wrote, pretty simlutaniously. When you
described tht to you it didn't mean that some of us , at leasi I, said
that in the US it was not such a meaning tht it had in oz. thant's all.
When you sain put him out of his misery we had had an automatic response.
Once we were told tht it was one of those bum , ass, knock up , kind of
differences between British based and American usages we could begin to
deal with it. Criticising us all and claiming dog iling, etc is rather
an overkill from the Aussies as it was totally new to us USAns that there
was any other meaning.

Please don't let your hostility towards Susan so cloud your view that you
misinterpret all of our reactions. It is simply one of those langage
differences that come up every once in a while.

Wendy
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W. Baker wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:


"KROM" wrote in message
...
sorry ozgirl but "put it out of its misery" has always meant to kill
it here and I've heard it used in UK movies in the euthanize
context.

put "what does put it out of its misery mean?" into a Google search
bar and see the result.

its very easy to take something a person says wrong..so lets be
careful when taking a idiom wrong in others because we will
eventually do it ourselves.

KROM


In my country an ass is not a butt. Should I take Americans literally
when they say ass? I accept what Americans use in that context, can
it be possible that Americans can accept different word/phrase
usages from others? Especially when the context was there, i.e.
followed by a list of possible ways to relieve said misery. Instead
of a call of Ozgirl suggests I kill my cat! How about, Ozgirl, are
you saying I should kill my cat? Nope, kangaroo trial instead.
Tolerance for differences at its best, but yet... the phrase means
more than just to kill even in America. Not my problem if people in
here haven't experienced it. Not my problem that people refuse to
check it into properly. Google: "define: put out of misery".


"http://www.writersevents.com/Words_Starting_with_P/put_ones_foot_down_put_something_together/put_someone_or_something_out_of_their_misery_defin ition.html
Idiom: put someone or something out of their misery
To ****relieve them***** from their physical suffering or their
mental anguish.
To kill (an animal that is in great pain)." (American)


"http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/put-sb-out-of-their-misery
to stop someone worrying, usually by giving them information that
they have been waiting for" (British)


"http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/put+someone+out+of+his+or+her+misery
Kill a wounded or suffering animal or person, as in When a horse
breaks a leg, there is nothing to do but put it out of its misery .
[Late 1700s]


End someone's feeling of suspense, as in Tell them who won the
tournament; put them out of their misery . [c. 1920] *******Both
usages employ put out of in the sense of "extricate" or "free
from."********" (American)


http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/put+out+of+misery
Put (one) out of (one's) misery
1. Euph. Fig. to kill someone as an act of mercy. Why doesn't the
doctor simply put her out of her misery? He took pills to put
himself out of his misery.
2. Fig. to end a suspenseful situation for someone. Please, put me
out of misery; what happened? I put her out of her misery and told
her how the movie ended.
See also: misery, out, put
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of ****************American
Idioms************* and Phrasal Verbs. ? 2002 by The McGraw-Hill
Companies, Inc.


Anyone still want to tell me the phase ONLY means to euthanise?




A number of us simultainiously were astounded to hear that there was
another meaning for a phrase we had all only heard s meaning to put
down or wthenize n animal. We all wrote, pretty simlutaniously.
When you described tht to you it didn't mean that some of us , at
leasi I, said that in the US it was not such a meaning tht it had in
oz. thant's all. When you sain put him out of his misery we had had
an automatic response. Once we were told tht it was one of those bum
, ass, knock up , kind of differences between British based and
American usages we could begin to deal with it. Criticising us all
and claiming dog iling, etc is rather an overkill from the Aussies as
it was totally new to us USAns that there was any other meaning.

Please don't let your hostility towards Susan so cloud your view that
you misinterpret all of our reactions. It is simply one of those
langage differences that come up every once in a while.


Could it be an age thing? Older people think it means that? I will ask my
mom.

Okay, I just did. She said in the context in which it was said, there is no
way she would think that. So not an age thing.


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Old 11-01-2012, 03:16 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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x-o-archive: yes

Kate, I don't really see what the person is looking for... is he still
on prednisone? Or dealing with the aftermath? Symptoms, post
discontinuation Cushing's or adrenal suppression?

Interesting about the heightened smell. When I had a bad/high steroid
reaction to azithromycin, my eyesight got very bright and almost
overcorrected sharpness.

Susan

On 1/10/2012 7:46 PM, Tiger Lily wrote:

copy and paste :

On 8-1-2012 0:42, Tiger Lily wrote:
On 1/7/2012 7:14 AM, BDR529 wrote:
BG monitoring is what I frequently do these days.

good, Q

what other weapons do you have to deal with the raised bg levels?
Metformin, ditching the prednison and lifestyle is the answer.

Q

well, yes, prednison is/can be a cause of diabetes

some folks have been able to return to lifestyle choices with no meds,
but many have to continue the diabetes meds

how are you doing with the Metformin? It's a great type 2 med with lots
of additional benefits and a LONG HISTORY.

i like the long history part

kate

After I ditched the prednison 4 days ago I experienced some
hypersensitiveness yesterday evening, my nose was suddenly all open and
very sensitive, suddenly I could smell literally everything, an
experience I haven't had in years. You name it, I could smell it,
coffee, mandarins, sambal (ugh), soap, fragrance, etc. And when the
ability to smell is high then the same is also true for taste, it was
amazing.

The metformine is in my case 500 mg daily, it prevents the hypo's but
not the hypers, so I have to adapt my lifestyle to that. At least I
tolerate the taste of metformine. This was not the case with prednison
which really has the most intense bitter taste of all medicines I've
ever used. Aerius is sort of in between. All of them required plenty of
water directly after you take them orally.

Q


i use for my email addy and many folks filter that

having said that, i'm getting e-mails that are a week old........ that i
haven't seen before

???
gotta love the internet!

kate




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Old 11-01-2012, 03:26 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Ozgirl wrote:


: "KROM" wrote in message
: ...
: sorry ozgirl but "put it out of its misery" has always meant to
kill
: it here and I've heard it used in UK movies in the euthanize
context.
:
: put "what does put it out of its misery mean?" into a Google
search
: bar and see the result.
:
: its very easy to take something a person says wrong..so lets be
: careful when taking a idiom wrong in others because we will
eventually
: do it ourselves.
:
: KROM

: In my country an ass is not a butt. Should I take Americans
literally
: when they say ass? I accept what Americans use in that context, can
it
: be possible that Americans can accept different word/phrase usages
from
: others? Especially when the context was there, i.e. followed by a
list
: of possible ways to relieve said misery. Instead of a call of Ozgirl
: suggests I kill my cat! How about, Ozgirl, are you saying I should
kill
: my cat? Nope, kangaroo trial instead. Tolerance for differences at
its
: best, but yet... the phrase means more than just to kill even in
: America. Not my problem if people in here haven't experienced it.
Not my
: problem that people refuse to check it into properly. Google:
"define:
: put out of misery".

:
"http://www.writersevents.com/Words_Starting_with_P/put_ones_foot_down_put_something_together/put_someone_or_something_out_of_their_misery_defin ition.html
: Idiom: put someone or something out of their misery
: To ****relieve them***** from their physical suffering or their
mental
: anguish.
: To kill (an animal that is in great pain)." (American)

:
"http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/put-sb-out-of-their-misery
: to stop someone worrying, usually by giving them information that
they
: have been waiting for" (British)

:
"http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/put+someone+out+of+his+or+her+misery
: Kill a wounded or suffering animal or person, as in When a horse
breaks
: a leg, there is nothing to do but put it out of its misery . [Late
: 1700s]

: End someone's feeling of suspense, as in Tell them who won the
: tournament; put them out of their misery . [c. 1920] *******Both
usages
: employ put out of in the sense of "extricate" or "free
from."********"
: (American)

: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/put+out+of+misery
: Put (one) out of (one's) misery
: 1. Euph. Fig. to kill someone as an act of mercy. Why doesn't the
doctor
: simply put her out of her misery? He took pills to put himself out
of
: his misery.
: 2. Fig. to end a suspenseful situation for someone. Please, put me
out
: of misery; what happened? I put her out of her misery and told her
how
: the movie ended.
: See also: misery, out, put
: McGraw-Hill Dictionary of ****************American
Idioms*************
: and Phrasal Verbs. ? 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

: Anyone still want to tell me the phase ONLY means to euthanise?

:

A number of us simultainiously were astounded to hear that there was
another meaning for a phrase we had all only heard s meaning to put
down
or wthenize n animal. We all wrote, pretty simlutaniously. When you
described tht to you it didn't mean that some of us , at leasi I, said
that in the US it was not such a meaning tht it had in oz. thant's
all.
When you sain put him out of his misery we had had an automatic
response.
Once we were told tht it was one of those bum , ass, knock up , kind
of
differences between British based and American usages we could begin
to
deal with it. Criticising us all and claiming dog iling, etc is
rather
an overkill from the Aussies as it was totally new to us USAns that
there
was any other meaning.


1. I explained (starting at least a couple of days ago) about there
being another meaning (with suggestions to check dictionaries and
context) yet the posts still kept flowing in about it only having one
meaning.

2. I haven't claimed dog piling at all. I defined (my own
interpretation) of what dog piling means to me in another message. I do
not feel dog piled.

3. This isn't a bum, arse difference at all because every American
dictionary I have been able to see online thus far gives two meanings to
the phrase (*without* saying the second meaning is more commonly a
British phrase) so its more a "I haven't experienced it" moment which
should mean the posts about it should have stopped long before now.

4. I have chosen to criticise anyone who has deliberately chosen to
block that second meaning out of their heads (even after my requests to
check out dictionaries and check context).

5. My aversion to a lot of things about Susan doesn't cloud my judgment.
People choose to ignore or justify her bad behaviour. If one wants to
take that stance then I enter into a debate with them also.

6. This is not simply a language difference (apart from the fact your
dictionaries give two meanings also). If Susan says something derogatory
a number of people jump to her defence claiming language difference or
any other excuse. If I supposedly say something that could be a language
difference issue I am crucified. Name one person in this thread that has
said anything like oh Jan, I understand you meant no harm, we didn't
realise that there was another meaning other than to euthanise an
animal. No posts have had anything remotely sincere, all have said (bar
one) that it means to kill. No acknowledgment of another meaning
therefore no apology.

Please don't let your hostility towards Susan so cloud your view that
you
misinterpret all of our reactions. It is simply one of those
langage
differences that come up every once in a while.


Wendy

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Old 11-01-2012, 03:43 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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The original

"And how about putting that poor cat out of yours out of its misery.
*****You could try probiotics. ****** ******If you are going
to traumatise him by getting T4 blood tests why not have him sedated and
given a 5 minute ultrasound to see if there is something seriously
wrong? *******Trauma is trauma no matter what. *****Skittish or not, the
cat needs
proper evaluation of his health not you playing around with his diet all
the time.****** You were obviously able to control him to have his blood
test,
you can surely control him to have sedation."

Yeah I can see where you all thought I meant Susan should put her cat
down, NOT!

And weird that no one but PP had a word to say about the fact I wanted
to kill Susan's cat (which was 5 days later). If everyone thought I
wanted her to put the cat down why wait 5 days? Why did no one call me
on being a hard hearted bitch?

Why does Susan (who self admittedly said she killfiled me so she
wouldn't have to see anything I had to say) not only read past the first
word of mine but also comments on what I write? Why does PP KF me in one
group but not another? I am either acceptable or not. Why are 99% of
Susan's insults towards me in this group and not in ASD? Not looking for
answers, just musing.



  #118 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2012, 03:45 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default For one who shall remain nameless.....



"BlueBrooke" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 11 Jan 2012 10:34:31 +1000, "Ozgirl"
wrote:

Anyone still want to tell me the phase ONLY means to euthanise?


As applied to animals? Yes.


And the proof of that statement is where?


  #119 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2012, 03:59 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 656
Default For one who shall remain nameless.....

I see someone who has a problem, may not be able to put words to it and
needs help.

My 'experience' with steroids doesn't go anywhere near what he's going
thru...... low dose for 5 days or the old 10 day step down method......
and every time it was very necessary and very effective with no side
affects (well, other than i had to test frequently and correct with
insulin as needed)

kate

On 1/10/2012 7:16 PM, Susan wrote:
x-o-archive: yes

Kate, I don't really see what the person is looking for... is he still
on prednisone? Or dealing with the aftermath? Symptoms, post
discontinuation Cushing's or adrenal suppression?

Interesting about the heightened smell. When I had a bad/high steroid
reaction to azithromycin, my eyesight got very bright and almost
overcorrected sharpness.

Susan

On 1/10/2012 7:46 PM, Tiger Lily wrote:

copy and paste :

On 8-1-2012 0:42, Tiger Lily wrote:
On 1/7/2012 7:14 AM, BDR529 wrote:
BG monitoring is what I frequently do these days.

good, Q

what other weapons do you have to deal with the raised bg levels?
Metformin, ditching the prednison and lifestyle is the answer.

Q
well, yes, prednison is/can be a cause of diabetes

some folks have been able to return to lifestyle choices with no meds,
but many have to continue the diabetes meds

how are you doing with the Metformin? It's a great type 2 med with lots
of additional benefits and a LONG HISTORY.

i like the long history part

kate

After I ditched the prednison 4 days ago I experienced some
hypersensitiveness yesterday evening, my nose was suddenly all open and
very sensitive, suddenly I could smell literally everything, an
experience I haven't had in years. You name it, I could smell it,
coffee, mandarins, sambal (ugh), soap, fragrance, etc. And when the
ability to smell is high then the same is also true for taste, it was
amazing.

The metformine is in my case 500 mg daily, it prevents the hypo's but
not the hypers, so I have to adapt my lifestyle to that. At least I
tolerate the taste of metformine. This was not the case with prednison
which really has the most intense bitter taste of all medicines I've
ever used. Aerius is sort of in between. All of them required plenty of
water directly after you take them orally.

Q


i use for my email addy and many folks filter that

having said that, i'm getting e-mails that are a week old........ that i
haven't seen before

???
gotta love the internet!

kate



  #120 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2012, 04:03 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default For one who shall remain nameless.....

x-o-archive: yes

On 1/10/2012 9:55 PM, BlueBrooke wrote:

Dictionary? Sure -- lots of dictionaries. Maybe you should pull
yours out again, because you don't seem to understand the word
"context." In the "context" of animals who are critically or
terminally ill, the phrase means to kill them.

But you already know that.


Yes.

Watching her try to lie her way to a plausible denial is quite an
extraordinary spectacle. Every time she does it.

Susan


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