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Old 06-11-2011, 03:33 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Eat those Carbs! The ADA says you should!!

On 10/31/2011 4:19 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
"Julie wrote in message
...

wrote in message
...
Julie Bove wrote:

snip

I didn't say you said it. I said the OP. Were you the OP? This has
gone on for so long now I can't remember who said what.

I was the OP. I didn't say it. And the entire thread had a total of 17
posts when I just checked. Doesn't seem so terribly long to me...


You said "Eat Those Carbs!" And I know somebody said they said to eat
more carbs.


Here you go! Susan said this!

"Yes, the ADA used to have a statement on their site, "eat more starches,
they're good for you!""

I used two quote marks on some of it because I was quoting Susan and she was
apparently quoting the ADA. Whether they actually said that or not I do not
know. I kind of think not.

To which I told her something to the extent of... Get over it! They no
longer say that.


The best I can tell, they were once likely to say that, back when they
had a certain person who started the current low-fat movement in a high
position. They are now slowly eliminating all such references, since
they've recognized that low-carb diets are a safe way to lose weight,
even if that's still not the method they recommend (only the one most
frequently recommended on the ADA forums).


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Old 06-11-2011, 08:00 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Eat those Carbs! The ADA says you should!!

no i meant the regional accents of the US not france, i took french, got a
good solid B with err uhmm very poor work habits, Lee
"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Storrmmee" wrote in message
...
because depending on the regional dialect it very well could have a "w"
in it, regional makes a huge difference, Lee, only commenting on the
sounds, not the mocking part


Well I don't know what region of France my French class was, but it was
pronounced with a vw sound. Like vwella! Doesn't sound a thing like
wallah.



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Old 06-11-2011, 09:44 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Eat those Carbs! The ADA says you should!!


"Storrmmee" wrote in message
...
no i meant the regional accents of the US not france, i took french, got a
good solid B with err uhmm very poor work habits, Lee


Hmmm... I can't imagine...


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Old 06-11-2011, 11:18 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Eat those Carbs! The ADA says you should!!

neither could my mother, luckily for me... i was not a pleaseant child in
that class, i hated it and was bored beyond beleif... was pretty disruptive
and now as i look back regret my ill behavior, Lee
"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Storrmmee" wrote in message
...
no i meant the regional accents of the US not france, i took french, got
a good solid B with err uhmm very poor work habits, Lee


Hmmm... I can't imagine...



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Old 06-11-2011, 08:12 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Eat those Carbs! The ADA says you should!!


"Storrmmee" wrote in message
...
neither could my mother, luckily for me... i was not a pleaseant child in
that class, i hated it and was bored beyond beleif... was pretty
disruptive and now as i look back regret my ill behavior, Lee


I was that way to an extent. OTOH I was a very quiet and reserved child (on
the surface) in public so my teachers would never believe that it was me
behind the pranks that I pulled. I got away with just short of murder.

In my younger years the school always had to find extra things for me to do.
I worked in the cafeteria, library and office. I was also an assistant for
several classes when I got older and I took extra classes. One thing I
didn't need was that extra two hours off when I was in high school. I
didn't have a thing to do because my homework was always done.




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Old 07-11-2011, 01:49 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Eat those Carbs! The ADA says you should!!

i was a bit easier to study/get grades than most if bored i was not a good
child, Lee
"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Storrmmee" wrote in message
...
neither could my mother, luckily for me... i was not a pleaseant child in
that class, i hated it and was bored beyond beleif... was pretty
disruptive and now as i look back regret my ill behavior, Lee


I was that way to an extent. OTOH I was a very quiet and reserved child
(on the surface) in public so my teachers would never believe that it was
me behind the pranks that I pulled. I got away with just short of murder.

In my younger years the school always had to find extra things for me to
do. I worked in the cafeteria, library and office. I was also an
assistant for several classes when I got older and I took extra classes.
One thing I didn't need was that extra two hours off when I was in high
school. I didn't have a thing to do because my homework was always done.



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Old 07-11-2011, 02:00 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Eat those Carbs! The ADA says you should!!


"Storrmmee" wrote in message
...
i was a bit easier to study/get grades than most if bored i was not a good
child, Lee


I got very good grades for the most part. Mostly A's. I did get an D in
penmanship in the 5th grade and a D in 11th grade chemistry. Got an A in
P.E. one year but all the other times only a C. I am just not athletically
inclined.

School was very easy for me which is why I got so bored.


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Old 07-11-2011, 02:51 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Seasonal recipe

Here's a recipe that's great for cold weather. It can be made in a large
slow cooker, or in a heavy dutch oven--I use cast iron, such as
LeCreuset--in the oven. I use a cast iron skillet for the browning phase.
It's my own version of stracotto, or pot roast for pasta. (Of course,
instead of pasta I usually eat it on a big bed of grated zucchini sauteed
with olive oil and garlic, or broccoli rabe, or kale.) It is a dish in which
the meat is supposed to fall apart into the sauce. I add some Greekish
elements (lemon and cinnamon), which gives it a different flavor from the
usual Italian fare. I like to make a big batch, and freeze it in smaller
quantities for future dinners, but it can easily be cut in half.

A 4 lb bottom round roast, or some similar lean braising cut, patted dry
with paper towels (See note at end about defatting if you use a fattier
cut.)
Olive oil
3 cups chopped onions
2 cups chopped carrots
2 cups chopped celery
8 cloves of garlic, minced
Zest of two lemons, removed in strips with a peeler
4 cinnamon sticks
about 2tsp-1Tb dried thyme
4 bay leaves
a lot of freshly ground black pepper, probably a teaspoon at least
salt, about 1 tsp to start
1 cup strong brown stock
1 cup red wine
Some combination of:
1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes
1/2-1 28oz can diced tomatoes
Possibly some tomato paste (I'll discuss the tomato issue below)

To a very hot cast iron skillet add a healthy drizzle of olive oil and
quickly brown the roast well on all sides, adding oil if necessary. (Expect
to make smoke and messy spatter if you want good flavor! ) Remove to the
slow cooker or cast iron pot. If using a slow cooker, turn it to high at
this point.

Add some oil to the pan if necessary, and quickly add the onions, celery,
and carrots. Cook, stirring frequently, over fairly high heat until the
onions have softened, turned gold, and begun to caramelize. Add the garlic
and cook briefly, then transfer vegetables to the cooker/pot, distributing
around the roast.

While the vegetables above are cooking, distribute the bay leaves, cinnamon
sticks, and lemon rind around the roast.

Deglaze the cast iron skillet with the stock and wine. While the liquids are
coming to a boil, pour the large can of crushed tomatoes around the roast,
and mix it up with the vegetables a bit. Add the thyme and about 1 tsp of
salt, and grind a lot of fresh black pepper over the whole thing. Pour the
wine/stock over the roast, and again mix it up a bit. Note that if you are
concerned about fitting all of the tomatoes into your cooker/pot, you may
want to reduce the wine/stock combo by 50% or so before adding it.

At this point, you have to decide how much more tomato to add. Ideally, you
would use two full 28 oz cans, but it may not fit in your cooker/pot,
depending its size and the size of the cut of meat. Add as much of the diced
tomatoes as you possibly can. It is also worth noting that you can use ALL
diced tomatoes, but in that case you will need to add a small can of tomato
paste, or possibly more. It's up to you, and you can adjust the thickness
with paste a few hours down the road.

If using a slowcooker, put the lid on and cook at high for about five hours.
If using the oven--you should have preheated it to 350F--bring the dish to a
simmer on top of the stove, cover, and cook for at least 2 hours. Adjust the
oven temp so that the dish is simmering, not boiling. Although it will
concentrate, you do not want the sauce to evaporate away. If necessary,
cover with parchment paper or foil under the lid. In a slow cooker, this
will not be an issue.

Remove the meat to a cutting board, and slice into thick pieces, about 1
inch or so. (The meat should be cooked through at this point.) Replace meat
in pot, roughly reassembling the roast. At this point, adjust S&P, and
decide whether you need to add tomato paste. Continue cooking for another 1
1/2 hours if in the oven (again, make sure it isn't drying out too much) and
2+ hours in the slow cooker. At the end the meat should be falling apart
into the sauce.

If you have used a fatty cut of meat, the easiest way to defat it is to
simply place the entire dish in the fridge overnight, and remove the
congealed stuff the next day. Luckily, this is great made the day before. If
you have used a lean cut, it will not be necessary.


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Old 07-11-2011, 06:09 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Seasonal recipe

Janet wrote:

Here's a recipe that's great for cold weather. It can be made in a large
slow cooker, or in a heavy dutch oven--I use cast iron, such as
LeCreuset--in the oven. I use a cast iron skillet for the browning phase.
It's my own version of stracotto, or pot roast for pasta. (Of course,
instead of pasta I usually eat it on a big bed of grated zucchini sauteed
with olive oil and garlic, or broccoli rabe, or kale.) It is a dish in
which the meat is supposed to fall apart into the sauce. I add some
Greekish elements (lemon and cinnamon), which gives it a different flavor
from the usual Italian fare. I like to make a big batch, and freeze it in
smaller quantities for future dinners, but it can easily be cut in half.


Mmmmm - thanks!! Saved for next Sunday dinner. (I am now officially in
charge of dinner every day except Monday. There will be leftovers :-) )



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