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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 12:41 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

"Evelyn" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:06:48 -0700, "Cheri"
wrote:

"BlueBrooke" wrote in message
. ..
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:44:36 -0500, "KROM" wrote:

if you notice she has only had protein shakes and a egg to eat..you too
would likely not need meds eating 8 ounces of food a day.

this surgery only forces restraint..its not a cure..not that you said it
was..I'm just thinking of the people who say this "cured" them and
nobody
thinks what if you fed a person the same food no surgery would it have
the
same effect..I think it would..but would be much harder as the surgery
lets
you feel full on that diet while a non bypass person would feel starved.

its interesting stuff to think about

Actually, there has been discussion in ASD about such surgery "curing"
T2, and there have been some interesting results.

Yes, if you're only eating eight ounces of food a day, the weight loss
is going to be swift and dramatic. And, yes, if you're only eating
protein, there's no "carb hit" to raise the BG. But with such a small
food intake each day, wouldn't there be issues with liver dumps?

I admit I don't know the in's and out's of all of this stuff, but from
what I've read in ASD from people who have not had this surgery, I
would think there would be BG problems with the limited food intake? I
know, personally, if I'm not eating much my BG can go up, especially
in the mornings. While I'm sure the "meals" are spread throughout the
day, wouldn't the mornings still be an issue? Evelyn says she isn't
needing her meds anymore, so I'm assuming her FBG is fine?

Just a lot of guessing, I know, but from this, and other reports, it
seems there's something going on other than just forced restraint.


I know a couple of people in real life that have had it. One was many
years
ago and she did eat her way through it after a few years, and one is
really
happy with it. I saw a show on Dr. Phil once where there was some
depression
going on after the surgery, due to the fact of not being able to eat some
things, but everyone is different and I think Evelyn has given it a lot of
thought before going ahead with it, so I do think she will be one of the
success stories. I think also that medicare and other insurances are
covering the surgery for most type 2's and not adhering strictly to the
100
pound overweight criteria anymore. :-)

Cheri



I began the process in January. They require attendance at nutrition
classes, educational classes, all sorts of medical testing to get
everything else in line, including a psych workup. One is very well
educated and ready for it by the time you get a surgical date.

As I said, my surgery is called "Gastric Sleeve" which consists of
simply making your stomach into a long narrow tube which only holds
about 4 ounces of anything at a time. The doctor said they have been
getting very good results with this surgery, which is not as drastic
as the bypass.

Evelyn


I'm really happy for you Evelyn, and wish you the best with it. I will be
really interested in your progress. I remember that Sambalover had some kind
of weight loss surgery, but she really didn't give updates on it that much,
I hope you do.

Cheri



  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 01:06 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 1,614
Default Hi everybody



"Cheri" wrote in message
...
"Evelyn" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:06:48 -0700, "Cheri"
wrote:

"BlueBrooke" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:44:36 -0500, "KROM" wrote:

if you notice she has only had protein shakes and a egg to eat..you
too
would likely not need meds eating 8 ounces of food a day.

this surgery only forces restraint..its not a cure..not that you
said it
was..I'm just thinking of the people who say this "cured" them and
nobody
thinks what if you fed a person the same food no surgery would it
have the
same effect..I think it would..but would be much harder as the
surgery
lets
you feel full on that diet while a non bypass person would feel
starved.

its interesting stuff to think about

Actually, there has been discussion in ASD about such surgery
"curing"
T2, and there have been some interesting results.

Yes, if you're only eating eight ounces of food a day, the weight
loss
is going to be swift and dramatic. And, yes, if you're only eating
protein, there's no "carb hit" to raise the BG. But with such a
small
food intake each day, wouldn't there be issues with liver dumps?

I admit I don't know the in's and out's of all of this stuff, but
from
what I've read in ASD from people who have not had this surgery, I
would think there would be BG problems with the limited food
intake? I
know, personally, if I'm not eating much my BG can go up,
especially
in the mornings. While I'm sure the "meals" are spread throughout
the
day, wouldn't the mornings still be an issue? Evelyn says she
isn't
needing her meds anymore, so I'm assuming her FBG is fine?

Just a lot of guessing, I know, but from this, and other reports,
it
seems there's something going on other than just forced restraint.

I know a couple of people in real life that have had it. One was many
years
ago and she did eat her way through it after a few years, and one is
really
happy with it. I saw a show on Dr. Phil once where there was some
depression
going on after the surgery, due to the fact of not being able to eat
some
things, but everyone is different and I think Evelyn has given it a
lot of
thought before going ahead with it, so I do think she will be one of
the
success stories. I think also that medicare and other insurances are
covering the surgery for most type 2's and not adhering strictly to
the 100
pound overweight criteria anymore. :-)

Cheri



I began the process in January. They require attendance at
nutrition
classes, educational classes, all sorts of medical testing to get
everything else in line, including a psych workup. One is very well
educated and ready for it by the time you get a surgical date.

As I said, my surgery is called "Gastric Sleeve" which consists of
simply making your stomach into a long narrow tube which only holds
about 4 ounces of anything at a time. The doctor said they have
been
getting very good results with this surgery, which is not as drastic
as the bypass.

Evelyn


I'm really happy for you Evelyn, and wish you the best with it. I will
be really interested in your progress. I remember that Sambalover had
some kind of weight loss surgery, but she really didn't give updates
on it that much, I hope you do.

Cheri



I am pretty sure Bev has kept the weight off. IIRC she had the
Roux-en-Y.

  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 02:37 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 894
Default Hi everybody

On Tue, 23 Aug 2011 10:06:53 +1000, "Ozgirl"
wrote:



"Cheri" wrote in message
...
"Evelyn" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:06:48 -0700, "Cheri"
wrote:

"BlueBrooke" wrote in message
m...
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:44:36 -0500, "KROM" wrote:

if you notice she has only had protein shakes and a egg to eat..you
too
would likely not need meds eating 8 ounces of food a day.

this surgery only forces restraint..its not a cure..not that you
said it
was..I'm just thinking of the people who say this "cured" them and
nobody
thinks what if you fed a person the same food no surgery would it
have the
same effect..I think it would..but would be much harder as the
surgery
lets
you feel full on that diet while a non bypass person would feel
starved.

its interesting stuff to think about

Actually, there has been discussion in ASD about such surgery
"curing"
T2, and there have been some interesting results.

Yes, if you're only eating eight ounces of food a day, the weight
loss
is going to be swift and dramatic. And, yes, if you're only eating
protein, there's no "carb hit" to raise the BG. But with such a
small
food intake each day, wouldn't there be issues with liver dumps?

I admit I don't know the in's and out's of all of this stuff, but
from
what I've read in ASD from people who have not had this surgery, I
would think there would be BG problems with the limited food
intake? I
know, personally, if I'm not eating much my BG can go up,
especially
in the mornings. While I'm sure the "meals" are spread throughout
the
day, wouldn't the mornings still be an issue? Evelyn says she
isn't
needing her meds anymore, so I'm assuming her FBG is fine?

Just a lot of guessing, I know, but from this, and other reports,
it
seems there's something going on other than just forced restraint.

I know a couple of people in real life that have had it. One was many
years
ago and she did eat her way through it after a few years, and one is
really
happy with it. I saw a show on Dr. Phil once where there was some
depression
going on after the surgery, due to the fact of not being able to eat
some
things, but everyone is different and I think Evelyn has given it a
lot of
thought before going ahead with it, so I do think she will be one of
the
success stories. I think also that medicare and other insurances are
covering the surgery for most type 2's and not adhering strictly to
the 100
pound overweight criteria anymore. :-)

Cheri



I began the process in January. They require attendance at
nutrition
classes, educational classes, all sorts of medical testing to get
everything else in line, including a psych workup. One is very well
educated and ready for it by the time you get a surgical date.

As I said, my surgery is called "Gastric Sleeve" which consists of
simply making your stomach into a long narrow tube which only holds
about 4 ounces of anything at a time. The doctor said they have
been
getting very good results with this surgery, which is not as drastic
as the bypass.

Evelyn


I'm really happy for you Evelyn, and wish you the best with it. I will
be really interested in your progress. I remember that Sambalover had
some kind of weight loss surgery, but she really didn't give updates
on it that much, I hope you do.

Cheri



I am pretty sure Bev has kept the weight off. IIRC she had the
Roux-en-Y.



My doc says he is getting just as good results with the gastric
sleeve, which leaves the duodenum intact and does not re-route
anything.
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 02:41 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

"Ozgirl" wrote in message
...

I am pretty sure Bev has kept the weight off. IIRC she had the Roux-en-Y.


I don't remember, but she didn't talk about it much because some people
ragged her about it.

Cheri


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 03:42 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 1,390
Default Hi everybody

Evelyn wrote:
:
: I began the process in January. They require attendance at
: nutrition
: classes, educational classes, all sorts of medical testing to get
: everything else in line, including a psych workup. One is very well
: educated and ready for it by the time you get a surgical date.
:
: As I said, my surgery is called "Gastric Sleeve" which consists of
: simply making your stomach into a long narrow tube which only holds
: about 4 ounces of anything at a time. The doctor said they have
: been
: getting very good results with this surgery, which is not as drastic
: as the bypass.
:
: Evelyn
:

: My doc says he is getting just as good results with the gastric
: sleeve, which leaves the duodenum intact and does not re-route
: anything.

Does this surgery actually physically make the stomach smaller or does it
wrap it in som ekind of sleeve that prevents it form maintaining its
regular shape?

Wendy-somewhat confused.




  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 10:38 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 4,619
Default Hi everybody

will you be required to take supplements/shakes, or will you be able to
return to solid foods? I know next to nothing about any of these surgeries,
Lee
"Evelyn" wrote in message
...

Just to let my friends on this newsgroup know that I had gastric
surgery a couple of weeks ago. I have already lost almost 30 lbs
from my highest weight. I lost twelve lbs before going into the
hospital and the rest since the surgery. The surgery my doctor chose
was the gastric sleeve, which is less invasive than the bypass.

The good news is that I have great energy, and am not using ANY
diabetes meds or insulin at this time. My numbers are great, but
then I am not eating hardly anything at all. Last night I had my
first soft boiled egg. Till now it has only been protein shakes for
all my meals.

I am glad I did it.

Evelyn



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Old 23-08-2011, 10:56 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

the reason it is interesting to me is I know a few people who have had it
done..sadly one person had a bad one and passed away so for years I was VERY
anti bypass...but seeing it as a last resort I see its value and there are
safer surgeries now.

recently a friend was debating getting it and told her to ask the doctor if
she could try to live as if she had the surgery..eating a Dixie cup of
protein shake and taking vitamins..

they reacted as if she had asked them to cut her head off!

they insisted the surgery was her only option.

my thing is we know these surgeries get results but nobody has tested a
person with a stapled jaw eating the exact same diet as the bypass person to
see if it truly is the "gut brain" theory of it its something else.

when I was 16 they insisted I was obese because I was large for my age and
they put me on a extreme diet of 8 ounces protein a day and water..and of
course within a month I was 5 percent body fat and you could see the muscle
striations in my chest and legs and back..I am genetically well muscled and
its what got me started in body building..but the point is it clearly worked
but why no the same diet but with unlimited green veggies or something less
drastic

but ever since them insisting I was near death at 20 pounds max overweight
at 16 it made me interested in fitness and diet..plus my mother dying a
horrible death from diabetes at 37..she was always following the latest fad
she read in the mags to "cure" herself.

sadly I have no answers..my friend got the surgery and did well but returned
to eating pre surgery and gained it back and we lost touch

but I always wondered what the results would be if she tried to eating as if
she had the surgery minus the surgery test...

KROM


"BlueBrooke" wrote in message
...

On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:44:36 -0500, "KROM" wrote:

if you notice she has only had protein shakes and a egg to eat..you too
would likely not need meds eating 8 ounces of food a day.

this surgery only forces restraint..its not a cure..not that you said it
was..I'm just thinking of the people who say this "cured" them and nobody
thinks what if you fed a person the same food no surgery would it have the
same effect..I think it would..but would be much harder as the surgery lets
you feel full on that diet while a non bypass person would feel starved.

its interesting stuff to think about


Actually, there has been discussion in ASD about such surgery "curing"
T2, and there have been some interesting results.

Yes, if you're only eating eight ounces of food a day, the weight loss
is going to be swift and dramatic. And, yes, if you're only eating
protein, there's no "carb hit" to raise the BG. But with such a small
food intake each day, wouldn't there be issues with liver dumps?

I admit I don't know the in's and out's of all of this stuff, but from
what I've read in ASD from people who have not had this surgery, I
would think there would be BG problems with the limited food intake? I
know, personally, if I'm not eating much my BG can go up, especially
in the mornings. While I'm sure the "meals" are spread throughout the
day, wouldn't the mornings still be an issue? Evelyn says she isn't
needing her meds anymore, so I'm assuming her FBG is fine?

Just a lot of guessing, I know, but from this, and other reports, it
seems there's something going on other than just forced restraint.

  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 10:58 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

please keep in my mind I was musing on the surgery itself and in no way
commenting on her surgery other then to wish her the best.

just wanted to be clear..its a interesting topic to me is all.

KROM


"Cheri" wrote in message ...

"BlueBrooke" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 12:44:36 -0500, "KROM" wrote:

if you notice she has only had protein shakes and a egg to eat..you too
would likely not need meds eating 8 ounces of food a day.

this surgery only forces restraint..its not a cure..not that you said it
was..I'm just thinking of the people who say this "cured" them and nobody
thinks what if you fed a person the same food no surgery would it have the
same effect..I think it would..but would be much harder as the surgery
lets
you feel full on that diet while a non bypass person would feel starved.

its interesting stuff to think about


Actually, there has been discussion in ASD about such surgery "curing"
T2, and there have been some interesting results.

Yes, if you're only eating eight ounces of food a day, the weight loss
is going to be swift and dramatic. And, yes, if you're only eating
protein, there's no "carb hit" to raise the BG. But with such a small
food intake each day, wouldn't there be issues with liver dumps?

I admit I don't know the in's and out's of all of this stuff, but from
what I've read in ASD from people who have not had this surgery, I
would think there would be BG problems with the limited food intake? I
know, personally, if I'm not eating much my BG can go up, especially
in the mornings. While I'm sure the "meals" are spread throughout the
day, wouldn't the mornings still be an issue? Evelyn says she isn't
needing her meds anymore, so I'm assuming her FBG is fine?

Just a lot of guessing, I know, but from this, and other reports, it
seems there's something going on other than just forced restraint.


I know a couple of people in real life that have had it. One was many years
ago and she did eat her way through it after a few years, and one is really
happy with it. I saw a show on Dr. Phil once where there was some depression
going on after the surgery, due to the fact of not being able to eat some
things, but everyone is different and I think Evelyn has given it a lot of
thought before going ahead with it, so I do think she will be one of the
success stories. I think also that medicare and other insurances are
covering the surgery for most type 2's and not adhering strictly to the 100
pound overweight criteria anymore. :-)

Cheri

  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 11:05 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

not to be too gross but a pal of mine had it done and we went to burger king
and she ate 3 fries and a small as in baby sized shake and went outside and
promptly tossed it all up much to the dismay of all eating at the window she
was in front of...lol

she thought she could get away with being naughty but was shown otherwise.

:-)

KROM


"Evelyn" wrote
Bariatric surgery is NOT a cure. You have to police yourself as time
goes on. It is a good head start, that's all. You actually CANNOT
cheat. You go to a party or a gathering, and all you can have is a
protein shake which you have brought with you in your little lunch
bag. All I care about is that I am not so hungry and I am able to
satisfy my hunger easily with a very small amount of food at this
point. We will see where the journey goes.

Evelyn

  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 11:31 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

lol.


"KROM" wrote in message
...
not to be too gross but a pal of mine had it done and we went to
burger king and she ate 3 fries and a small as in baby sized shake and
went outside and promptly tossed it all up much to the dismay of all
eating at the window she was in front of...lol

she thought she could get away with being naughty but was shown
otherwise.

:-)

KROM


"Evelyn" wrote
Bariatric surgery is NOT a cure. You have to police yourself as time
goes on. It is a good head start, that's all. You actually CANNOT
cheat. You go to a party or a gathering, and all you can have is a
protein shake which you have brought with you in your little lunch
bag. All I care about is that I am not so hungry and I am able to
satisfy my hunger easily with a very small amount of food at this
point. We will see where the journey goes.

Evelyn




  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 02:17 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

On Tue, 23 Aug 2011 02:42:50 +0000 (UTC), "W. Baker"
wrote:

Evelyn wrote:
:
: I began the process in January. They require attendance at
: nutrition
: classes, educational classes, all sorts of medical testing to get
: everything else in line, including a psych workup. One is very well
: educated and ready for it by the time you get a surgical date.
:
: As I said, my surgery is called "Gastric Sleeve" which consists of
: simply making your stomach into a long narrow tube which only holds
: about 4 ounces of anything at a time. The doctor said they have
: been
: getting very good results with this surgery, which is not as drastic
: as the bypass.
:
: Evelyn
:

: My doc says he is getting just as good results with the gastric
: sleeve, which leaves the duodenum intact and does not re-route
: anything.

Does this surgery actually physically make the stomach smaller or does it
wrap it in som ekind of sleeve that prevents it form maintaining its
regular shape?

Wendy-somewhat confused.



They actually cut away most of the stomach, leaving only a long thin
tubular shaped stomach that only holds a few ounces of food. They
staple the edges shut. Google it. There is a lot of information on
the net.
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Old 23-08-2011, 02:18 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 18:41:12 -0700, "Cheri"
wrote:

"Ozgirl" wrote in message
...

I am pretty sure Bev has kept the weight off. IIRC she had the Roux-en-Y.


I don't remember, but she didn't talk about it much because some people
ragged her about it.

Cheri



That is why I only posted about it here. I know most of the posters
here are the kinder variety :-)
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 02:21 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

On Tue, 23 Aug 2011 05:05:18 -0500, "KROM" wrote:

not to be too gross but a pal of mine had it done and we went to burger king
and she ate 3 fries and a small as in baby sized shake and went outside and
promptly tossed it all up much to the dismay of all eating at the window she
was in front of...lol

she thought she could get away with being naughty but was shown otherwise.

:-)

KROM



The kind of surgery I had doesn't result in you upchucking the food.
The Rouen-Y surgery disconnects the duodenum and often results in
throwing up. I had the Gastric Sleeve. You can look it up. There
is a lot of information on the net about it. If you eat too much,
you just feel over full.
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 02:22 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Hi everybody

On Tue, 23 Aug 2011 04:38:08 -0500, "Storrmmee"
wrote:

will you be required to take supplements/shakes, or will you be able to
return to solid foods? I know next to nothing about any of these surgeries,
Lee



I had a scrambled egg and a slice of american cheese for breakfast.
Eaten very slowly and very well chewed before swallowing.
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 23-08-2011, 02:42 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 4,619
Default Hi everybody

I have a question, why is removing part of the stomach and making the tube
prefferable to the, lap band, surgery. not sure if i got the name right,
but the stomach is bandaded and can be adjusted/removed supposedly easily...
I am just more curious than anything else, Lee
"Evelyn" wrote in message
...
On Mon, 22 Aug 2011 18:41:12 -0700, "Cheri"
wrote:

"Ozgirl" wrote in message
...

I am pretty sure Bev has kept the weight off. IIRC she had the
Roux-en-Y.


I don't remember, but she didn't talk about it much because some people
ragged her about it.

Cheri



That is why I only posted about it here. I know most of the posters
here are the kinder variety :-)





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