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  #61 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2011, 07:21 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Tonight's dinner

On 3/17/2011 4:15 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 7:14 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:

There is very little sugar in cinnamon sugar compared to cinnamon.
And I don't put much on. Lucky if 1/8 teaspoon is sugar. But we
didn't invent this. It became popular here after the introduction of
American style steakhouses.

That's weird because our steakhouses don't serve sweet potatoes at all.
They serve French fries, steak fries and baked potatoes.

We also have Outback Steakhouse, purportedly an Austrailian style place
with
Bloomin' Onions. This is an onion cut to look like a flower, battered
and
deep fried. Quite nasty and greasy it is.



I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many Aussies
involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming" since umm ummm
*ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that would show an Aussie
involved in it somewhere.


Ewww.


Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better interpretation

i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common language"

kate

(Jan???)


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Old 19-03-2011, 07:28 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Tonight's dinner

Tiger Lily wrote:
On 3/17/2011 4:15 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 7:14 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:

There is very little sugar in cinnamon sugar compared to cinnamon.
And I don't put much on. Lucky if 1/8 teaspoon is sugar. But we
didn't invent this. It became popular here after the introduction
of American style steakhouses.

That's weird because our steakhouses don't serve sweet potatoes at
all. They serve French fries, steak fries and baked potatoes.

We also have Outback Steakhouse, purportedly an Austrailian style
place with
Bloomin' Onions. This is an onion cut to look like a flower,
battered and
deep fried. Quite nasty and greasy it is.



I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming"
since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.


Ewww.


Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
interpretation
i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
language"


I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband was from
Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the word. Not
one I could say with little children around.


  #63 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2011, 07:30 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Tonight's dinner

On 3/17/2011 7:24 PM, Ozgirl wrote:


"RodS" wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 12:05 AM, W. Baker wrote:
wrote:


: wrote in message
: ...
: On 17/03/2011 10:58 AM, Julie Bove wrote:

: My mom always made the canned ones, mashed with marshmallows on the
: top. I
: always thought I hated them because of the marshmallows.
:
: Never seen canned sweet potato, never put marshmallow on a vegetable
: either, WHY would anyone put marshmallow on vegetables ? I must have
: led a sheltered life :-) Baked with butter and pinch of cinnamon
: sugar, nothing nicer.

: Bought KFC for the kids tonight and they now have sweet potato fries.
: Everyone but me was buying them.
: Might be tempted to try them one day.. I can't imagine canned sweet
: potato. As to the marshmallows, I'll have to keep imagining it Did
: someone one day just say, oh what the heck, I am putting
marshmallows on
: my sweet potato?

The marshmallow dish is a cassaarole of mashed sweet potatoes, often
sweetened with brown sugar and/or pineapple juice, which is topped with
teh marshmallows adn baked. This is often a holiday dish, like for
thansgiving. Very sweet, as you can see. Not oneof y favorites even in
pre-diabetes days, but very popular as the holidays dish, like pumpkin
pie. My moher used to not use the marshmallows, but put slices of
pineapple on top.

Another holiday dish popular in the USA is that string bean cassarole
made
with cream of mushroom soup and ccanned french fried onions.


Something else never seen here (at least I never have) a bit like
canned chicken and canned pumpkin also never seen and hard to imagine.
What other novel things do you lot put in a can :-) I *have* seen
fried grasshoppers, not a big seller though.


I have seen the canned chicken here, only once but quite recently. I had
no urge to buy it



these are good foods to have around in 'case of a disaster' and none of
us know when that may be

be the disaster
1. earthquake
2. tsunami
3. terrorist attack (have you looked up your city's chances of being a
target?)
4. tornado/hurricane (remember Katrina?? )
5. etc etc etc

- we have a supply of 'camping food'
- we have an 'emergency run with this tub'
- i keep a current storage of a month's worth of meds in a tub i can
grab, insulin etc needs to be grabbed separately
- we have a 'cash reserve' cause don't expect your credit cards or debit
card to be accepted IF the gas pumps can deliver gas/diesel
- and lots more............. check your local city's 'emergency
evacuation plan' to ensure you comply
- we never let our gas tank get below 1/2 full............ enough to get
us away from the 'target area' that we live in
- we have a check list to make sure we don't miss anything
- we have a plan to 'meet' in the event we aren't in the same location
in the event of an emergency
- damn, i have to learn how to tow a 33 ft RV trailer!

kate


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Old 19-03-2011, 07:41 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Tonight's dinner

On 3/19/2011 12:28 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Tiger Lily wrote:
On 3/17/2011 4:15 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 7:14 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:

There is very little sugar in cinnamon sugar compared to cinnamon.
And I don't put much on. Lucky if 1/8 teaspoon is sugar. But we
didn't invent this. It became popular here after the introduction
of American style steakhouses.

That's weird because our steakhouses don't serve sweet potatoes at
all. They serve French fries, steak fries and baked potatoes.

We also have Outback Steakhouse, purportedly an Austrailian style
place with
Bloomin' Onions. This is an onion cut to look like a flower,
battered and
deep fried. Quite nasty and greasy it is.



I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming"
since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.

Ewww.


Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
interpretation
i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
language"


I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband was from
Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the word. Not
one I could say with little children around.


that was very leading............. i thought my interpretation was
pretty clear

care to eludicate?

kate
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Old 19-03-2011, 08:12 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 44,978
Default Tonight's dinner


"Tiger Lily" wrote in message
...
On 3/19/2011 12:28 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Tiger Lily wrote:
On 3/17/2011 4:15 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 7:14 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:

There is very little sugar in cinnamon sugar compared to cinnamon.
And I don't put much on. Lucky if 1/8 teaspoon is sugar. But we
didn't invent this. It became popular here after the introduction
of American style steakhouses.

That's weird because our steakhouses don't serve sweet potatoes at
all. They serve French fries, steak fries and baked potatoes.

We also have Outback Steakhouse, purportedly an Austrailian style
place with
Bloomin' Onions. This is an onion cut to look like a flower,
battered and
deep fried. Quite nasty and greasy it is.



I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming"
since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.

Ewww.


Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
interpretation
i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
language"


I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband was from
Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the word. Not
one I could say with little children around.


that was very leading............. i thought my interpretation was pretty
clear

care to eludicate?


I was told it had to do with the bleeding that occurs with the taking of
virginity. Of course they could have just been messing with me.




  #66 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2011, 08:26 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,614
Default Tonight's dinner



"Tiger Lily" wrote in message
...
On 3/17/2011 4:15 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 7:14 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:

There is very little sugar in cinnamon sugar compared to cinnamon.
And I don't put much on. Lucky if 1/8 teaspoon is sugar. But we
didn't invent this. It became popular here after the introduction
of
American style steakhouses.

That's weird because our steakhouses don't serve sweet potatoes at
all.
They serve French fries, steak fries and baked potatoes.

We also have Outback Steakhouse, purportedly an Austrailian style
place
with
Bloomin' Onions. This is an onion cut to look like a flower,
battered
and
deep fried. Quite nasty and greasy it is.



I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
Aussies
involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming" since umm
ummm
*ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that would show an Aussie
involved in it somewhere.


Ewww.


Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
interpretation

i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
language"

kate

(Jan???)




Bloody 'ell woman!

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Old 19-03-2011, 08:27 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 1,614
Default Tonight's dinner



"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...
Tiger Lily wrote:
On 3/17/2011 4:15 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 7:14 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:

There is very little sugar in cinnamon sugar compared to
cinnamon.
And I don't put much on. Lucky if 1/8 teaspoon is sugar. But we
didn't invent this. It became popular here after the introduction
of American style steakhouses.

That's weird because our steakhouses don't serve sweet potatoes at
all. They serve French fries, steak fries and baked potatoes.

We also have Outback Steakhouse, purportedly an Austrailian style
place with
Bloomin' Onions. This is an onion cut to look like a flower,
battered and
deep fried. Quite nasty and greasy it is.



I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming"
since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.

Ewww.


Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
interpretation
i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
language"


I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband was
from Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the
word. Not one I could say with little children around.


Its a very benign word. On a scale of 1 to 10, the F bomb being 10 it is
a 1.


  #68 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2011, 08:32 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 1,614
Default Tonight's dinner



"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Tiger Lily" wrote in message
...
On 3/19/2011 12:28 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Tiger Lily wrote:
On 3/17/2011 4:15 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 7:14 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:

There is very little sugar in cinnamon sugar compared to
cinnamon.
And I don't put much on. Lucky if 1/8 teaspoon is sugar. But we
didn't invent this. It became popular here after the
introduction
of American style steakhouses.

That's weird because our steakhouses don't serve sweet potatoes
at
all. They serve French fries, steak fries and baked potatoes.

We also have Outback Steakhouse, purportedly an Austrailian
style
place with
Bloomin' Onions. This is an onion cut to look like a flower,
battered and
deep fried. Quite nasty and greasy it is.



I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say
"blooming"
since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.

Ewww.


Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
interpretation
i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
language"

I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband was
from
Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the word.
Not
one I could say with little children around.


that was very leading............. i thought my interpretation was
pretty clear

care to eludicate?


I was told it had to do with the bleeding that occurs with the taking
of virginity. Of course they could have just been messing with me.


Could have been. As Kate said, the best word to compare it with would be
damn. As to to the blooming onions, we can't lay claim to those :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blooming_onion


  #69 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2011, 08:33 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 1,614
Default Tonight's dinner



"Tiger Lily" wrote in message
...
On 3/17/2011 7:24 PM, Ozgirl wrote:


"RodS" wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 12:05 AM, W. Baker wrote:
wrote:


: wrote in message
: ...
: On 17/03/2011 10:58 AM, Julie Bove wrote:

: My mom always made the canned ones, mashed with marshmallows on
the
: top. I
: always thought I hated them because of the marshmallows.
:
: Never seen canned sweet potato, never put marshmallow on a
vegetable
: either, WHY would anyone put marshmallow on vegetables ? I must
have
: led a sheltered life :-) Baked with butter and pinch of cinnamon
: sugar, nothing nicer.

: Bought KFC for the kids tonight and they now have sweet potato
fries.
: Everyone but me was buying them.
: Might be tempted to try them one day.. I can't imagine canned
sweet
: potato. As to the marshmallows, I'll have to keep imagining it
Did
: someone one day just say, oh what the heck, I am putting
marshmallows on
: my sweet potato?

The marshmallow dish is a cassaarole of mashed sweet potatoes,
often
sweetened with brown sugar and/or pineapple juice, which is topped
with
teh marshmallows adn baked. This is often a holiday dish, like for
thansgiving. Very sweet, as you can see. Not oneof y favorites even
in
pre-diabetes days, but very popular as the holidays dish, like
pumpkin
pie. My moher used to not use the marshmallows, but put slices of
pineapple on top.

Another holiday dish popular in the USA is that string bean
cassarole
made
with cream of mushroom soup and ccanned french fried onions.

Something else never seen here (at least I never have) a bit like
canned chicken and canned pumpkin also never seen and hard to
imagine.
What other novel things do you lot put in a can :-) I *have* seen
fried grasshoppers, not a big seller though.


I have seen the canned chicken here, only once but quite recently. I
had
no urge to buy it



these are good foods to have around in 'case of a disaster' and none
of us know when that may be

be the disaster
1. earthquake
2. tsunami
3. terrorist attack (have you looked up your city's chances of being
a target?)
4. tornado/hurricane (remember Katrina?? )
5. etc etc etc

- we have a supply of 'camping food'
- we have an 'emergency run with this tub'
- i keep a current storage of a month's worth of meds in a tub i can
grab, insulin etc needs to be grabbed separately
- we have a 'cash reserve' cause don't expect your credit cards or
debit card to be accepted IF the gas pumps can deliver gas/diesel
- and lots more............. check your local city's 'emergency
evacuation plan' to ensure you comply
- we never let our gas tank get below 1/2 full............ enough to
get us away from the 'target area' that we live in
- we have a check list to make sure we don't miss anything
- we have a plan to 'meet' in the event we aren't in the same location
in the event of an emergency
- damn, i have to learn how to tow a 33 ft RV trailer!


lol


  #70 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2011, 09:16 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 44,978
Default Tonight's dinner


"Ozgirl" wrote in message
...


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Tiger Lily" wrote in message
...
On 3/19/2011 12:28 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Tiger Lily wrote:
On 3/17/2011 4:15 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 7:14 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:

There is very little sugar in cinnamon sugar compared to cinnamon.
And I don't put much on. Lucky if 1/8 teaspoon is sugar. But we
didn't invent this. It became popular here after the introduction
of American style steakhouses.

That's weird because our steakhouses don't serve sweet potatoes at
all. They serve French fries, steak fries and baked potatoes.

We also have Outback Steakhouse, purportedly an Austrailian style
place with
Bloomin' Onions. This is an onion cut to look like a flower,
battered and
deep fried. Quite nasty and greasy it is.



I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming"
since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.

Ewww.


Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
interpretation
i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
language"

I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband was
from
Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the word.
Not
one I could say with little children around.


that was very leading............. i thought my interpretation was
pretty clear

care to eludicate?


I was told it had to do with the bleeding that occurs with the taking of
virginity. Of course they could have just been messing with me.


Could have been. As Kate said, the best word to compare it with would be
damn. As to to the blooming onions, we can't lay claim to those :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blooming_onion


I googled the word and came up with another definition. Something about the
blood of Christ. Also saw that the word was pretty much considered not
polite at all to use until about the 80's.




  #71 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2011, 09:31 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 1,614
Default Tonight's dinner



"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Ozgirl" wrote in message
...


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Tiger Lily" wrote in message
...
On 3/19/2011 12:28 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Tiger Lily wrote:
On 3/17/2011 4:15 PM, Julie Bove wrote:
wrote in message
...
On 18/03/2011 7:14 AM, Julie Bove wrote:
Ozgirl wrote:

There is very little sugar in cinnamon sugar compared to
cinnamon.
And I don't put much on. Lucky if 1/8 teaspoon is sugar. But
we
didn't invent this. It became popular here after the
introduction
of American style steakhouses.

That's weird because our steakhouses don't serve sweet
potatoes at
all. They serve French fries, steak fries and baked potatoes.

We also have Outback Steakhouse, purportedly an Austrailian
style
place with
Bloomin' Onions. This is an onion cut to look like a flower,
battered and
deep fried. Quite nasty and greasy it is.



I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say
"blooming"
since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.

Ewww.


Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
interpretation
i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
language"

I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband
was from
Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the
word. Not
one I could say with little children around.


that was very leading............. i thought my interpretation was
pretty clear

care to eludicate?

I was told it had to do with the bleeding that occurs with the
taking of virginity. Of course they could have just been messing
with me.


Could have been. As Kate said, the best word to compare it with would
be damn. As to to the blooming onions, we can't lay claim to those
:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blooming_onion


I googled the word and came up with another definition. Something
about the blood of Christ. Also saw that the word was pretty much
considered not polite at all to use until about the 80's.


Well its been used in the UK and Aus, probably Ireland too a lot longer
than I have been alive. I have never heard it used in any way other than
a "soft" swear word.

  #72 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2011, 07:47 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Posts: 1,390
Default Tonight's dinner

Julie Bove wrote:

: "Ozgirl" wrote in message
: ...
:
:
: "Julie Bove" wrote in message
:
:
: I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
: Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming"
: since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
: would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.
:
: Ewww.
:
:
: Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
: interpretation
: i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
: language"
:
: I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband was
: from
: Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the word.
: Not
: one I could say with little children around.
:
:
: that was very leading............. i thought my interpretation was
: pretty clear
:
: care to eludicate?
:
: I was told it had to do with the bleeding that occurs with the taking of
: virginity. Of course they could have just been messing with me.
:
: Could have been. As Kate said, the best word to compare it with would be
: damn. As to to the blooming onions, we can't lay claim to those :
:
: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blooming_onion

: I googled the word and came up with another definition. Something about the
: blood of Christ. Also saw that the word was pretty much considered not
: polite at all to use until about the 80's.

That is the definition I know and as it was considered blasphamy, or,at
lst sadrelgious, in relitgious ages it was considered quite nasty thing to
say . Damn, was also in that camp in ages past.

Wendy

  #73 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-03-2011, 07:52 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Tonight's dinner

Ozgirl wrote:


: I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
: Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming"
: since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
: would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.
:
: Ewww.
:
:
: Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
: interpretation
: i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
: language"
:
: I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband was
: from Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the
: word. Not one I could say with little children around.

: Its a very benign word. On a scale of 1 to 10, the F bomb being 10 it is
: a 1.
:
:

That's becsue in our time,, religious swearing is no big deal, as most
people don't take it that seriously, but sex is a big deal and
preoccupation so sex swear words are much more serious.

Wendy
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Old 19-03-2011, 10:09 PM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Tonight's dinner


"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Ozgirl wrote:


: I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
: Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say "blooming"
: since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
: would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.
:
: Ewww.
:
:
: Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
: interpretation
: i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
: language"
:
: I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband was
: from Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of the
: word. Not one I could say with little children around.

: Its a very benign word. On a scale of 1 to 10, the F bomb being 10 it is
: a 1.
:
:

That's becsue in our time,, religious swearing is no big deal, as most
people don't take it that seriously, but sex is a big deal and
preoccupation so sex swear words are much more serious.


There are a lot of people here who get very upset if you say, "Oh my God!"
Apparently that doesn't go over well.


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Old 20-03-2011, 01:50 AM posted to alt.food.diabetic
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Default Tonight's dinner



"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Ozgirl wrote:


: I have heard about that place I don't think there is too many
: Aussies involved with it, I haven't heard an Aussie say
"blooming"
: since umm ummm *ever* :-) Now if they were Bloody onions, that
: would show an Aussie involved in it somewhere.
:
: Ewww.
:
:
: Julie, read 'damned' instead of Bloody, you will get a better
: interpretation
: i await further clarification from "countries divided by a common
: language"
:
: I don't know. I worked with a woman from England. Her husband
was
: from Australian. One of them gave me a different definition of
the
: word. Not one I could say with little children around.

: Its a very benign word. On a scale of 1 to 10, the F bomb being 10
it is
: a 1.
:
:

That's becsue in our time,, religious swearing is no big deal, as
most
people don't take it that seriously, but sex is a big deal and
preoccupation so sex swear words are much more serious.



I really don't know anyone who would view the word bloody as a religious
word. Even in the 50's when I was born no one saw a problem with men
saying it sometimes and that was a time when swear words like s*&t,
ba#$%@d etc would have got you locked up if said in public. So I doubt
anyone has thought about or even known the supposed origin of the word
bloody for a very long time.



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