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-   -   chuck eye roast vs minute roast? (https://www.foodbanter.com/diabetic/400324-chuck-eye-roast-vs.html)

Ellen K. 05-09-2010 08:53 AM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
I was thinking to try to get grass-fed brisket for Rosh Hashana but I don't
see any advertised. The only grass-fed roasts I see advertised are chuck
eye roast and minute roast. I've never made either one, can anybody tell me
what these two cuts are like? Also, how would one prepare them?


Ozgirl 05-09-2010 09:25 AM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 


"Ellen K." wrote in message
...
I was thinking to try to get grass-fed brisket for Rosh Hashana but I
don't see any advertised. The only grass-fed roasts I see advertised
are chuck eye roast and minute roast. I've never made either one, can
anybody tell me what these two cuts are like? Also, how would one
prepare them?


With the chuck eye I'd be doing a slow cooker roast with some vegetables
of choice and little beef stock. The minute roast should be good in the
oven or the slow cooker.


Ellen K. 05-09-2010 09:43 AM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 

"Ozgirl" wrote in message
...


"Ellen K." wrote in message
...
I was thinking to try to get grass-fed brisket for Rosh Hashana but I
don't see any advertised. The only grass-fed roasts I see advertised are
chuck eye roast and minute roast. I've never made either one, can
anybody tell me what these two cuts are like? Also, how would one
prepare them?


With the chuck eye I'd be doing a slow cooker roast with some vegetables
of choice and little beef stock. The minute roast should be good in the
oven or the slow cooker.


Hmmm. Based on that I think I might go for the minute roast. Thanks.
:)


Julie Bove 05-09-2010 10:19 AM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 

"Ellen K." wrote in message
...
I was thinking to try to get grass-fed brisket for Rosh Hashana but I don't
see any advertised. The only grass-fed roasts I see advertised are chuck
eye roast and minute roast. I've never made either one, can anybody tell
me what these two cuts are like? Also, how would one prepare them?


I've never even heard of a minute roast!



Ellen K. 05-09-2010 10:59 AM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 

"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Ellen K." wrote in message
...
I was thinking to try to get grass-fed brisket for Rosh Hashana but I
don't see any advertised. The only grass-fed roasts I see advertised are
chuck eye roast and minute roast. I've never made either one, can anybody
tell me what these two cuts are like? Also, how would one prepare them?


I've never even heard of a minute roast!


I had minute steak recently at a social event, didn't look like anything but
was actually delicious. I hope minute roast is what the minute steaks were
before being sliced. g but serious


Janet Wilder[_1_] 05-09-2010 05:46 PM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
On 9/5/2010 2:53 AM, Ellen K. wrote:
I was thinking to try to get grass-fed brisket for Rosh Hashana but I
don't see any advertised. The only grass-fed roasts I see advertised are
chuck eye roast and minute roast. I've never made either one, can
anybody tell me what these two cuts are like? Also, how would one
prepare them?


The chuck eye is a pot roast cut. You can make it like you would do a
brisket as it also needs slow braising.

L'shanna tova!

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

Janet 05-09-2010 06:29 PM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
Ellen K. wrote:
"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Ellen K." wrote in message
...
I was thinking to try to get grass-fed brisket for Rosh Hashana but
I don't see any advertised. The only grass-fed roasts I see
advertised are chuck eye roast and minute roast. I've never made
either one, can anybody tell me what these two cuts are like? Also, how
would one prepare them?


I've never even heard of a minute roast!


I had minute steak recently at a social event, didn't look like
anything but was actually delicious. I hope minute roast is what the
minute steaks were before being sliced. g but serious


If so, it's going to be REALLY tough....minute steaks being pounded hard
before cooking. (I've never heard of a minute roast, either.)




Cheri[_3_] 05-09-2010 07:19 PM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
"Janet" wrote in message
...
Ellen K. wrote:
"Julie Bove" wrote in message
...

"Ellen K." wrote in message
...
I was thinking to try to get grass-fed brisket for Rosh Hashana but
I don't see any advertised. The only grass-fed roasts I see
advertised are chuck eye roast and minute roast. I've never made
either one, can anybody tell me what these two cuts are like? Also, how
would one prepare them?

I've never even heard of a minute roast!


I had minute steak recently at a social event, didn't look like
anything but was actually delicious. I hope minute roast is what the
minute steaks were before being sliced. g but serious


If so, it's going to be REALLY tough....minute steaks being pounded hard
before cooking. (I've never heard of a minute roast, either.)


I hadn't either until I Googled it.

http://www.mykoshermarket.com/Product_66_Company.html



Ellen K. 05-09-2010 10:45 PM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
Thanks very much for the new year greeting and same to you. :)

How I used to make brisket was:

Put a large piece of heavy duty tinfoil in the pan.
Slice some onions very thin and put some of them on the tinfoil.
Salt the meat on both sides, and put it fat side up on top of the onions.
Put the rest of the onions on top.
Cover and refrigerate at least an hour.
Uncover and put about a cup of water in the pan.
Brown about 20 minutes at 450-500 depending on the oven.
Turn the meat over (using the tinfoil) and brown another 20 minutes.
Turn the oven down to 325, turn the meat over again, make sure there are
lots of onions on top, add more water, cover, and cook 2 to 2 1/2 hours.

Does this help with the answer?

"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
On 9/5/2010 2:53 AM, Ellen K. wrote:
I was thinking to try to get grass-fed brisket for Rosh Hashana but I
don't see any advertised. The only grass-fed roasts I see advertised are
chuck eye roast and minute roast. I've never made either one, can
anybody tell me what these two cuts are like? Also, how would one
prepare them?


The chuck eye is a pot roast cut. You can make it like you would do a
brisket as it also needs slow braising.

L'shanna tova!

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.



Janet Wilder[_1_] 06-09-2010 03:24 AM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
On 9/5/2010 4:45 PM, Ellen K. wrote:
Thanks very much for the new year greeting and same to you. :)

How I used to make brisket was:

Put a large piece of heavy duty tinfoil in the pan.
Slice some onions very thin and put some of them on the tinfoil.
Salt the meat on both sides, and put it fat side up on top of the onions.
Put the rest of the onions on top.
Cover and refrigerate at least an hour.
Uncover and put about a cup of water in the pan.
Brown about 20 minutes at 450-500 depending on the oven.
Turn the meat over (using the tinfoil) and brown another 20 minutes.
Turn the oven down to 325, turn the meat over again, make sure there are
lots of onions on top, add more water, cover, and cook 2 to 2 1/2 hours.

Does this help with the answer?


I usually don't salt my meat, but lots of onions is a good thing. I also
like to put a little beef broth in the foil and a little bit of dry red
wine. I think it helps to tenderize the meat. I like to season it with
garlic, bay leaf, thyme and margerom and some pepper. Some people won't
do a brisket without a little Heinz ketchup in the braising liquid.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

Ellen K. 06-09-2010 04:07 AM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
On 9/5/2010 4:45 PM, Ellen K. wrote:
Thanks very much for the new year greeting and same to you. :)

How I used to make brisket was:

Put a large piece of heavy duty tinfoil in the pan.
Slice some onions very thin and put some of them on the tinfoil.
Salt the meat on both sides, and put it fat side up on top of the onions.
Put the rest of the onions on top.
Cover and refrigerate at least an hour.
Uncover and put about a cup of water in the pan.
Brown about 20 minutes at 450-500 depending on the oven.
Turn the meat over (using the tinfoil) and brown another 20 minutes.
Turn the oven down to 325, turn the meat over again, make sure there are
lots of onions on top, add more water, cover, and cook 2 to 2 1/2 hours.

Does this help with the answer?


I usually don't salt my meat, but lots of onions is a good thing. I also
like to put a little beef broth in the foil and a little bit of dry red
wine. I think it helps to tenderize the meat. I like to season it with
garlic, bay leaf, thyme and margerom and some pepper. Some people won't do
a brisket without a little Heinz ketchup in the braising liquid.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.


Well, I personally won't be eating the onions, or not more than a taste
anyway, but hopefully the taste will infuse the meat.


Janet 06-09-2010 02:17 PM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
Ellen K. wrote:
Thanks very much for the new year greeting and same to you. :)

How I used to make brisket was:


snip

I highly recommend the recipe Nach Waxman's Brisket from The New Basics
Silver Palate cookbook. It is fabulous. A bit more laborious than your
version, but not terribly so.




W. Baker 06-09-2010 06:02 PM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
Ellen K. wrote:

: : Yes, I am using kosher meat.
:
: : On kosher chicken I usually use salt substitute with the other spices,
: but
: : for chicken soup I put salt. I haven't made brisket in many years but
: I'm
: : pretty sure I used to use just a tiny bit, to help the onions soak in.
:
: You must have a pretty high salt taste. I no longer avoid it, but was
: told to be off salt some 25 years ago and cooked low sodium fo many years
: unil I found that it didn't spike my weight as I did not retain water when
: I ate salt. I still cook rather low salt, as that has become my taste. I
: do et pickles and olives, etc a flavor accent, but do not saalt my kosher
: meat, including stews. i do salt soups now as they are much better that
: way. I often use the parev "chicken" soup powdr in place of salt(never
: in addition to it), as I regard it as a flavored salt.
:
: Wendy

: That pareve chicken soup powder IS salt, with some trans fat and a couple of
: parsley flakes added. But I can't deny that it really tastes good in some
: dishes. g but serious

: I don't really have such a high salt taste. I rinse all my meat and poultry
: pretty well before starting to prepare it, probably that removes some of the
: salt from the kashering.

When I was on the low sodium diet, I would soak the chicken in cold water
in teh fridge overnight, changing the water a few time. This got much of
the salt out of the chicken. It is deep inside so rinsing doesn't get to
it. I no longer have to do this, just a bit of a rinse while cleaning and
trimming the bird or its parts, add no salt. I thin my taste buds have
permanently changed:-)

Wendy

W. Baker 06-09-2010 06:14 PM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
Here is my recipe for my caramelized brisket. It is an old family recipe
and never fails. You can use eithe a brisket or a top of the rib,
slightly leaner and cheaper, but the same kind of ropey grain. This time
I found it by Googling!

Wendy

Brisket, Caramelized (M, KLP, TNT)
Source: Celia C. Wisan to W. Baker
Serves: 6-12 depending on the size of the brisket
1 first cut brisket or top of the rib-3-7 lbs.
2-4 garlic cloves, peeled
salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1-3 onions thinly sliced
3-4 fresh tomatoes (summer) or 4-5 canned plum tomatoes drained. Use juice
for another recipe. Do not use more tomatoes
1-3 bay leaves

At least one day before cooking, put slivers of garlic in slits all over
the brisket. Rub it well with freshly ground black pepper and optionally,
salt. Slice onions and arrange all over and under the roast. Marinate
covered in the fridge overnight.

Day of cooking: Preheat oven to 500 F--that's 500 !

Put meat in a roasting pan with a cover and arrange the onion slices from
the night before all around.

Squash either 3 medium fresh tomatoes or use about 4 canned egg tomatoes
and squash them. DO NOT ADD THE JUICE FROM THE CAN. ADD NO OTHER LIQUID
add a bay leaf or two.

Cover the pan and put it into the preheated 500F oven. After 15 minutes
turn
down the oven without opening it to 350 F. Cook for approximately 3 hours.
If you look in after 2 hours or so you will see a gray mass with lots of
liquid. Don't worry. Just keep cooking.

When the water has just about disappeared and the meat and onions etc. are
browned, but not quite burnt, and the meat is soft to a fork, it is done.

Remove the meat from the pan and make gravy by deglazing the pan with lots
of water (more than a quart to start, it can always be reduced) and
cooking it down until it tastes rich and nice to you. It should make
plenty of gravy as the pan drippings are intensely strong.

Slice the meat across the grain and serve with the gravy. Roast potatoes
or kasha go well with this.

This lends itself to preparation ahead of time and freezes well. When
reheating, bring the sliced meat to room temperature and heat the gravy to
boiling. Then pour it over the meat. Heating the meat in the gravy gives
it a boiled rather than roasted taste and is not as good.

Posted by Wendy Baker


Ellen K. 07-09-2010 06:14 AM

chuck eye roast vs minute roast?
 
Sounds yummy. :)

How amusing, to find your own recipe by googling!!!

"W. Baker" wrote in message
...
Here is my recipe for my caramelized brisket. It is an old family recipe
and never fails. You can use eithe a brisket or a top of the rib,
slightly leaner and cheaper, but the same kind of ropey grain. This time
I found it by Googling!

Wendy

Brisket, Caramelized (M, KLP, TNT)
Source: Celia C. Wisan to W. Baker
Serves: 6-12 depending on the size of the brisket
1 first cut brisket or top of the rib-3-7 lbs.
2-4 garlic cloves, peeled
salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1-3 onions thinly sliced
3-4 fresh tomatoes (summer) or 4-5 canned plum tomatoes drained. Use juice
for another recipe. Do not use more tomatoes
1-3 bay leaves

At least one day before cooking, put slivers of garlic in slits all over
the brisket. Rub it well with freshly ground black pepper and optionally,
salt. Slice onions and arrange all over and under the roast. Marinate
covered in the fridge overnight.

Day of cooking: Preheat oven to 500 F--that's 500 !

Put meat in a roasting pan with a cover and arrange the onion slices from
the night before all around.

Squash either 3 medium fresh tomatoes or use about 4 canned egg tomatoes
and squash them. DO NOT ADD THE JUICE FROM THE CAN. ADD NO OTHER LIQUID
add a bay leaf or two.

Cover the pan and put it into the preheated 500F oven. After 15 minutes
turn
down the oven without opening it to 350 F. Cook for approximately 3 hours.
If you look in after 2 hours or so you will see a gray mass with lots of
liquid. Don't worry. Just keep cooking.

When the water has just about disappeared and the meat and onions etc. are
browned, but not quite burnt, and the meat is soft to a fork, it is done.

Remove the meat from the pan and make gravy by deglazing the pan with lots
of water (more than a quart to start, it can always be reduced) and
cooking it down until it tastes rich and nice to you. It should make
plenty of gravy as the pan drippings are intensely strong.

Slice the meat across the grain and serve with the gravy. Roast potatoes
or kasha go well with this.

This lends itself to preparation ahead of time and freezes well. When
reheating, bring the sliced meat to room temperature and heat the gravy to
boiling. Then pour it over the meat. Heating the meat in the gravy gives
it a boiled rather than roasted taste and is not as good.

Posted by Wendy Baker




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