Diabetic (alt.food.diabetic) This group is for the discussion of controlled-portion eating plans for the dietary management of diabetes.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 01:48 AM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default Donairs?

I found this recipe and it sounded good, but far too carby. Does anyone
have a recipe for this with less carbs in it?

Thanks!

http://beef.allrecipes.com/az/71963.asp
--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm



  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 02:11 AM
Hahabogus
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Julie Bove" wrote in
news:[email protected]:

http://beef.allrecipes.com/az/71963.asp


So its just the milk and the suger the flour is easily handled by guuar
guar gum.

perhaps real cream instead of the evap milk?

INGREDIENTS:

* 1 teaspoon salt
* 1 teaspoon ground oregano
* 1 teaspoon all-purpose flour
* 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
* 1/2 teaspoon Italian seasoning
* 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
* 1/2 teaspoon onion powder
* 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
* 1 pound ground beef
*
* 1 (12 fluid ounce) can evaporated milk
* 3/4 cup white sugar
* 2 teaspoons garlic powder
* 4 teaspoons white vinegar, or as needed



--
Starchless in Manitoba.
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 02:32 AM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 00:48:02 GMT, "Julie Bove"
wrote:

I found this recipe and it sounded good, but far too carby. Does anyone
have a recipe for this with less carbs in it?

Thanks!

http://beef.allrecipes.com/az/71963.asp


I've never heard of "Donairs" although it sounds like it would be
related to a form of doner kebab.

The meat section looks fine. You could try any of a dozen different
low-carb sauces in your repertoire to substitute for the milk-and-sugar
sauce.

I usually use the yoghurt sauce when I buy kebabs in the food court; I
don't have my own recipe but the one used here with the lamb burgers
looks pretty good:

http://www.gourmed.gr/mediterranean-...id=28&arid=359

It'll still have some carbs from the yoghurt, but nowhere near as bad as
the one in the original recipe above.

yoghurt sauce
12 ounces plain yoghurt
2 small garlic cloves
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbs shredded fresh mint leaves - or to taste

Mince and mash the garlic with the salt. Drain yoghurt in a sieve lined
with a dampened paper towel set over a bowl for 30 minutes. Transfer to
a small bowl and combine with the garlic and mint.


Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia.
Remove weight and carbs to email.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 02:53 AM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Hahabogus" wrote in message
...
"Julie Bove" wrote in
news:[email protected]:

http://beef.allrecipes.com/az/71963.asp


So its just the milk and the suger the flour is easily handled by guuar
guar gum.

perhaps real cream instead of the evap milk?


I've never tried guar gum, but the lady at the health food store keeps
mentioning it. Thanks! I'll try that. And then there's the sugar. Not
sure if Splenda would work for that or not.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 02:54 AM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Alan" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 00:48:02 GMT, "Julie Bove"
wrote:

I found this recipe and it sounded good, but far too carby. Does anyone
have a recipe for this with less carbs in it?

Thanks!

http://beef.allrecipes.com/az/71963.asp


I've never heard of "Donairs" although it sounds like it would be
related to a form of doner kebab.

The meat section looks fine. You could try any of a dozen different
low-carb sauces in your repertoire to substitute for the milk-and-sugar
sauce.


Since I don't eat sauces, I have nothing in my repertoire, except for tomato
sauce on pasta.

I usually use the yoghurt sauce when I buy kebabs in the food court; I
don't have my own recipe but the one used here with the lamb burgers
looks pretty good:


http://www.gourmed.gr/mediterranean-...id=28&arid=359

It'll still have some carbs from the yoghurt, but nowhere near as bad as
the one in the original recipe above.

yoghurt sauce
12 ounces plain yoghurt
2 small garlic cloves
1/4 tsp salt
3 tbs shredded fresh mint leaves - or to taste

Mince and mash the garlic with the salt. Drain yoghurt in a sieve lined
with a dampened paper towel set over a bowl for 30 minutes. Transfer to
a small bowl and combine with the garlic and mint.


Thanks! But that doesn't sound very tasty to me. I can't stand garlic or
yogurt.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 03:35 AM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 01:54:42 GMT, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


Thanks! But that doesn't sound very tasty to me. I can't stand garlic or
yogurt.

--


Fairy Nuff:-)

No accounting for tastes, YMMV.


Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia.
Remove weight and carbs to email.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 04:35 AM
Dennis Rekuta
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Alan wrote:
On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 00:48:02 GMT, "Julie Bove"
wrote:


I found this recipe and it sounded good, but far too carby. Does anyone
have a recipe for this with less carbs in it?

Thanks!

http://beef.allrecipes.com/az/71963.asp



I've never heard of "Donairs" although it sounds like it would be
related to a form of doner kebab.


Depends on what part of the world your ethnic fast food restaurants come
from in your neck of the woods. Lebanese and some Turkish places call
the ground meat mixture on the vertical spit Donair, while most Turkish
places stick to Doner. The Greek version is mostly known as Gyros. At
least that is the North American experience.

The thin, marinated meat slices that are stacked on the same style of
vertical spit are called Shawarma here by both Arab and Jewish vendors,
whether it is chicken or beef. Don't even start on the differences
between Turkish, Yugoslavian, Balkans, Lebanese/Arab (even Pakistani)
versions of grilled or baked Kofta/Kofte (spiced ground meat shaped like
either sausages or flat meatloafs).

I just tell them to put it on my plate, and if there is no room in my
carb allowance, chuck out the pita bread (thick Greek style, generic
"Arab" style, or super thin, super large Syrian style).

Dennis (Type 2)
  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 05:02 AM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Dennis Rekuta" wrote in message
. ..


I've never heard of "Donairs" although it sounds like it would be
related to a form of doner kebab.


Depends on what part of the world your ethnic fast food restaurants come
from in your neck of the woods. Lebanese and some Turkish places call
the ground meat mixture on the vertical spit Donair, while most Turkish
places stick to Doner. The Greek version is mostly known as Gyros. At
least that is the North American experience.


Ohhhhhhhh! Well, if they're like Gyros, then I wouldn't like them. I have
had those and don't care for them at all.

The thin, marinated meat slices that are stacked on the same style of
vertical spit are called Shawarma here by both Arab and Jewish vendors,
whether it is chicken or beef. Don't even start on the differences
between Turkish, Yugoslavian, Balkans, Lebanese/Arab (even Pakistani)
versions of grilled or baked Kofta/Kofte (spiced ground meat shaped like
either sausages or flat meatloafs).

I just tell them to put it on my plate, and if there is no room in my
carb allowance, chuck out the pita bread (thick Greek style, generic
"Arab" style, or super thin, super large Syrian style).


Thanks! Food can be soooo confusing!

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 10:08 AM
Hahabogus
 
Posts: n/a
Default

"Julie Bove" wrote in
news:[email protected]:

Thanks! But that doesn't sound very tasty to me. I can't stand
garlic or yogurt.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm


Yikes!!!
And I used to think so highly of you!!!

--
Starchless in Manitoba.
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-10-2004, 11:58 AM
Siobhan Perricone
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Wed, 06 Oct 2004 01:53:10 GMT, "Julie Bove"
wrote:

perhaps real cream instead of the evap milk?


I've never tried guar gum, but the lady at the health food store keeps
mentioning it. Thanks! I'll try that. And then there's the sugar. Not
sure if Splenda would work for that or not.


Just as a rule of thumb, splenda can replace sugar one for one in any
recipe that isn't depending on some quality of sugar that splenda doesn't
have. Sauces, beverages... they're all fine. With baking or ice cream you
need to make adjustments because the sugar does more than just sweeten.
When you bake with splenda it can come out dry and heavy if you don't
adjust. Ice cream hardens too much because there's something about sugar
that helps keep the ice cream soft enough to eat.

--
Siobhan Perricone
Humans wrote the bible,
God wrote the rocks
-- Word of God by Kathy Mar


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-10-2004, 04:35 AM
Dennis Rekuta
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Julie Bove wrote:
"Dennis Rekuta" wrote in message
. ..


I've never heard of "Donairs" although it sounds like it would be
related to a form of doner kebab.


Depends on what part of the world your ethnic fast food restaurants come
from in your neck of the woods. Lebanese and some Turkish places call
the ground meat mixture on the vertical spit Donair, while most Turkish
places stick to Doner. The Greek version is mostly known as Gyros. At
least that is the North American experience.



Ohhhhhhhh! Well, if they're like Gyros, then I wouldn't like them. I have
had those and don't care for them at all.


Julie: Is it the garlic? You can't really get around that in most of the
middle-east and Indian sub-continent. It is as ubiquitous as air in most
of the food from that part of the world. You could skip the yogurt or
yogurt-garlic sauce and just go with the other condiments if you could
get by the garlic in the meat. The meat in the Greek gyros may be more
coarsely ground than in a Donair or doner, but that probably depends on
the chef, or the parents who taught them if it is a family operation.

You could probably make the kofte/kofta yourself without garlic and
grill them or bake them. There are a lot of recipes around, but you
really can't come close to restaurant quality gyros/donair/doner at
home. Shawarma at home is not that difficult. Instead of stacking the
meat slices on the vertical spit, you simply grill them after marinating
them. You then stack some slices on a cutting board and cut them into
strips. In effect, the meat ends up in pieces just like you would get
from slicing downwards on the vertical spit.

Shawarma or even grilled kofta calls for some form of tahini sauce if
you can't handle the garlic sauce (aioli), and a nice smear of chili
paste helps. Condiments can be tomato (grilled is nice), pickled veggies
(turnip or hot peppers), thinly sliced onions, and even chopped parsley
or cilantro. Pita bread is optional.

Sounds like Chicago vs. New York vs. Coney Island hot dogs . (Yum!) Food
is Fun!!! So many nations, so little time.

Dennis (Type 2)
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 07-10-2004, 07:31 AM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Dennis Rekuta" wrote in message
...

Julie: Is it the garlic? You can't really get around that in most of the
middle-east and Indian sub-continent. It is as ubiquitous as air in most
of the food from that part of the world. You could skip the yogurt or
yogurt-garlic sauce and just go with the other condiments if you could
get by the garlic in the meat. The meat in the Greek gyros may be more
coarsely ground than in a Donair or doner, but that probably depends on
the chef, or the parents who taught them if it is a family operation.


I don't like garlic, but it's the texture of the meat I can't stand. The
stuff we get around here is very chewy.

You could probably make the kofte/kofta yourself without garlic and
grill them or bake them. There are a lot of recipes around, but you
really can't come close to restaurant quality gyros/donair/doner at
home. Shawarma at home is not that difficult. Instead of stacking the
meat slices on the vertical spit, you simply grill them after marinating
them. You then stack some slices on a cutting board and cut them into
strips. In effect, the meat ends up in pieces just like you would get
from slicing downwards on the vertical spit.

Shawarma or even grilled kofta calls for some form of tahini sauce if
you can't handle the garlic sauce (aioli), and a nice smear of chili
paste helps. Condiments can be tomato (grilled is nice), pickled veggies
(turnip or hot peppers), thinly sliced onions, and even chopped parsley
or cilantro. Pita bread is optional.

Sounds like Chicago vs. New York vs. Coney Island hot dogs . (Yum!) Food
is Fun!!! So many nations, so little time.


Well, maybe I will try them then. Just so long as they don't have avocado
in them. Hehe!

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-10-2004, 01:40 AM
Dennis Rekuta
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Julie Bove wrote:

Well, maybe I will try them then. Just so long as they don't have avocado
in them. Hehe!


Avocados, like beets, should be deleted from the gene pools of the
world. ;-))

Dennis (type 2)


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 06:46 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017