Diabetic (alt.food.diabetic) This group is for the discussion of controlled-portion eating plans for the dietary management of diabetes.

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Old 19-09-2004, 02:05 AM
Alan
 
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Default Simple stir fries

Simple stir fries

They never spike me.

If you omit the aromatics and extras preparation, a simple soy sauce
stir-fry lunch takes five minutes from fridge to plate.

Base Per person:

One or two cups of stir-fry mix (see previous post). Extras such as
spinach, chard or silver-beet can be added at this stage. Sliced tomato
can be added in the final minute of cooking.
1 chopped or crushed clove of garlic
teaspoon chopped or crushed ginger

Heat some olive oil in a large skillet or wok. When hot, partially
pre-cook any meats you intend using and reserve them. Add the aromatics,
stir, add the remaining ingredients before the garlic starts to burn,
stir over high heat until the veges are just starting to colour but are
still crisp. Cook further depending on the variations.

Variations.

1. Add a few slurps of soy sauce, your desired protein (pre-cooked
strips of chicken or red meat, fish, seafood etc) and just enough water
to finish the cooking and provide a flavourful sauce. Experiment a
little to work out just how much water you need. Too much and it will go
soggy and overcook, too little and it may undercook and there is no
sauce.

2. Instead of soy:
A. experiment with your own mix of curry ingredients (I use turmeric,
cumin, mustard seeds, chilis, cardamon, garam masala, coriander powder,
lemon grass etc) or just add curry powder. Can be added at any stage or
ground in a mortar and pestle with the garlic and ginger.
B. Try a little low-carb ketchup or napoli sauce with the soy sauce mix.
C. Add your favourite spices and herbs from the garden with a squeeze of
lemon.

Experiment, bon appetit.

Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia.
Remove weight and carbs to email.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.

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Old 19-09-2004, 04:50 AM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Alan" wrote in message
...
Simple stir fries

They never spike me.

If you omit the aromatics and extras preparation, a simple soy sauce
stir-fry lunch takes five minutes from fridge to plate.

Base Per person:

One or two cups of stir-fry mix (see previous post). Extras such as
spinach, chard or silver-beet can be added at this stage.


I've seen golden beets or red beets. But what is silver-beet?

snip

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm


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Old 19-09-2004, 04:50 AM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Alan" wrote in message
...
Simple stir fries

They never spike me.

If you omit the aromatics and extras preparation, a simple soy sauce
stir-fry lunch takes five minutes from fridge to plate.

Base Per person:

One or two cups of stir-fry mix (see previous post). Extras such as
spinach, chard or silver-beet can be added at this stage.


I've seen golden beets or red beets. But what is silver-beet?

snip

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm


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Old 19-09-2004, 04:50 AM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Alan" wrote in message
...
Simple stir fries

They never spike me.

If you omit the aromatics and extras preparation, a simple soy sauce
stir-fry lunch takes five minutes from fridge to plate.

Base Per person:

One or two cups of stir-fry mix (see previous post). Extras such as
spinach, chard or silver-beet can be added at this stage.


I've seen golden beets or red beets. But what is silver-beet?

snip

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm


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Old 19-09-2004, 06:25 AM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 03:50:59 GMT, "Julie Bove"
wrote:




"Alan" wrote in message
.. .
Simple stir fries

They never spike me.

If you omit the aromatics and extras preparation, a simple soy sauce
stir-fry lunch takes five minutes from fridge to plate.

Base Per person:

One or two cups of stir-fry mix (see previous post). Extras such as
spinach, chard or silver-beet can be added at this stage.


I've seen golden beets or red beets. But what is silver-beet?

snip


Hi Julie

Part of the same family as swiss chard. Similar to Spinach when cooked,
but larger leaves. I grow them in the back-yard and keep harvesting
leaves from the plants for a month or two in season. They don't have a
bulb like sugar-beets.
http://myveggiegarden.freeservers.com/Silver_beet.htm.
or http://home.vtown.com.au/dbellamy/ve...s/silver1.html.

Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia.
Remove weight and carbs to email.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2004, 07:09 AM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Alan" wrote in message
news
On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 03:50:59 GMT, "Julie Bove"
wrote:




"Alan" wrote in message
.. .
Simple stir fries

They never spike me.

If you omit the aromatics and extras preparation, a simple soy sauce
stir-fry lunch takes five minutes from fridge to plate.

Base Per person:

One or two cups of stir-fry mix (see previous post). Extras such as
spinach, chard or silver-beet can be added at this stage.


I've seen golden beets or red beets. But what is silver-beet?

snip


Hi Julie

Part of the same family as swiss chard. Similar to Spinach when cooked,
but larger leaves. I grow them in the back-yard and keep harvesting
leaves from the plants for a month or two in season. They don't have a
bulb like sugar-beets.
http://myveggiegarden.freeservers.com/Silver_beet.htm.
or http://home.vtown.com.au/dbellamy/ve...s/silver1.html.


Interesting! I wonder if they go by another name here? I've been looking
for a particular leafy vegetable that comes in some packaged salads. It
looks like a small spinach leaf with a beet red strip down the center. I
think it might be baby swiss chard. At any rate, my daughter loves the
stuff and I can't seem to find those leaves just by themselves. I'm hoping
I can grow some next summer.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm


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Old 19-09-2004, 09:21 AM
Annette
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

I've been looking
for a particular leafy vegetable that comes in some packaged salads. It
looks like a small spinach leaf with a beet red strip down the center. I
think it might be baby swiss chard. At any rate, my daughter loves the
stuff and I can't seem to find those leaves just by themselves. I'm

hoping
I can grow some next summer.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm



Those are simply the leaves of immature red beets. That's why they have
that red vein down the centre. If you can grow your own beets, then you can
pick some of the little leaves for use in salads or stir frys. Beets are
dead easy to grow, you can pick leaves for your daughter, ( just one or two
from each plant), and still have the beets to eat as well! They don't seem
to mind the loss of one or two leaves. I suppose it is possible to do the
same with the yellow ones too!

And Alan, it looks like those plant breeders have now released some new
versions of our old silver beet, and developed the red and bright yellow
beets for leaf production, instead of the swollen root that we call "beets".
I saw them in BiLo just the other day. The stalks seem to be the main part
that is used (for the colour I guess). They are about the size and thickness
of rhubarb.

Last year I also purchased a fairly new variety of miniature white turnip in
the veggie section, the "root" only grows into small gobes, rather like
those little round, red radishes. Yes, it is completely white, thin-skinned
and great if the raw turnip is finely sliced into a salad or stir fry. They
are just a little peppery, crisp and crunchy. We loved them.

There are just so many delicious new items now available in supermarkets in
Oz. Have you tried the marinated button mushrooms, or those teeny weeny
little pickled gerkins? And of course there are the small lebanese cucumbers
with their thin skins, for salads, and the asian "egg plants" like little
black sausages, for italian dishes.

Ooooooooh, the food, the food!!!!!

And all so low carb too.

Annette
Now you have made me feel hungry!!!!! What's for dinner, I ask my SO? Heh
heh.



  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2004, 09:21 AM
Annette
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

I've been looking
for a particular leafy vegetable that comes in some packaged salads. It
looks like a small spinach leaf with a beet red strip down the center. I
think it might be baby swiss chard. At any rate, my daughter loves the
stuff and I can't seem to find those leaves just by themselves. I'm

hoping
I can grow some next summer.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm



Those are simply the leaves of immature red beets. That's why they have
that red vein down the centre. If you can grow your own beets, then you can
pick some of the little leaves for use in salads or stir frys. Beets are
dead easy to grow, you can pick leaves for your daughter, ( just one or two
from each plant), and still have the beets to eat as well! They don't seem
to mind the loss of one or two leaves. I suppose it is possible to do the
same with the yellow ones too!

And Alan, it looks like those plant breeders have now released some new
versions of our old silver beet, and developed the red and bright yellow
beets for leaf production, instead of the swollen root that we call "beets".
I saw them in BiLo just the other day. The stalks seem to be the main part
that is used (for the colour I guess). They are about the size and thickness
of rhubarb.

Last year I also purchased a fairly new variety of miniature white turnip in
the veggie section, the "root" only grows into small gobes, rather like
those little round, red radishes. Yes, it is completely white, thin-skinned
and great if the raw turnip is finely sliced into a salad or stir fry. They
are just a little peppery, crisp and crunchy. We loved them.

There are just so many delicious new items now available in supermarkets in
Oz. Have you tried the marinated button mushrooms, or those teeny weeny
little pickled gerkins? And of course there are the small lebanese cucumbers
with their thin skins, for salads, and the asian "egg plants" like little
black sausages, for italian dishes.

Ooooooooh, the food, the food!!!!!

And all so low carb too.

Annette
Now you have made me feel hungry!!!!! What's for dinner, I ask my SO? Heh
heh.



  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2004, 09:50 AM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 18:21:49 +1000, "Annette"
wrote:


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

I've been looking
for a particular leafy vegetable that comes in some packaged salads. It
looks like a small spinach leaf with a beet red strip down the center. I
think it might be baby swiss chard. At any rate, my daughter loves the
stuff and I can't seem to find those leaves just by themselves. I'm

hoping
I can grow some next summer.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm



Those are simply the leaves of immature red beets. That's why they have
that red vein down the centre. If you can grow your own beets, then you can
pick some of the little leaves for use in salads or stir frys. Beets are
dead easy to grow, you can pick leaves for your daughter, ( just one or two
from each plant), and still have the beets to eat as well! They don't seem
to mind the loss of one or two leaves. I suppose it is possible to do the
same with the yellow ones too!

And Alan, it looks like those plant breeders have now released some new
versions of our old silver beet, and developed the red and bright yellow
beets for leaf production, instead of the swollen root that we call "beets".
I saw them in BiLo just the other day. The stalks seem to be the main part
that is used (for the colour I guess). They are about the size and thickness
of rhubarb.

Last year I also purchased a fairly new variety of miniature white turnip in
the veggie section, the "root" only grows into small gobes, rather like
those little round, red radishes. Yes, it is completely white, thin-skinned
and great if the raw turnip is finely sliced into a salad or stir fry. They
are just a little peppery, crisp and crunchy. We loved them.

There are just so many delicious new items now available in supermarkets in
Oz. Have you tried the marinated button mushrooms, or those teeny weeny
little pickled gerkins? And of course there are the small lebanese cucumbers
with their thin skins, for salads, and the asian "egg plants" like little
black sausages, for italian dishes.

Ooooooooh, the food, the food!!!!!

And all so low carb too.

Annette
Now you have made me feel hungry!!!!! What's for dinner, I ask my SO? Heh
heh.


Hi Annette and Julie

We grow Fordhhok giants.

Now you know why I added:

"And anything else I may have forgotten that you like or Quentin
suggested:-)" to my original stir-fry ingredients list. There are so
many veges out there. But I tried to include many of the things Quentin
recommended such as onion, garlic, yellow capsicum, beans etc. The
turmeric is something I use a lot because of advice on my cancer list.

Effectively, add whatever you like that's in season but maintain the
core items. Sometimes you may need to check the cooking method or timing
to add it to the mix.

Mushrooms, to me, are the perfect weight-loss diet food (add them late,
like tomatoes). Taste good and almost zero carbs and calories/kj,
provided you don't drown them in oil when you cook them.


Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia.
Remove weight and carbs to email.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2004, 09:50 AM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 18:21:49 +1000, "Annette"
wrote:


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

I've been looking
for a particular leafy vegetable that comes in some packaged salads. It
looks like a small spinach leaf with a beet red strip down the center. I
think it might be baby swiss chard. At any rate, my daughter loves the
stuff and I can't seem to find those leaves just by themselves. I'm

hoping
I can grow some next summer.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm



Those are simply the leaves of immature red beets. That's why they have
that red vein down the centre. If you can grow your own beets, then you can
pick some of the little leaves for use in salads or stir frys. Beets are
dead easy to grow, you can pick leaves for your daughter, ( just one or two
from each plant), and still have the beets to eat as well! They don't seem
to mind the loss of one or two leaves. I suppose it is possible to do the
same with the yellow ones too!

And Alan, it looks like those plant breeders have now released some new
versions of our old silver beet, and developed the red and bright yellow
beets for leaf production, instead of the swollen root that we call "beets".
I saw them in BiLo just the other day. The stalks seem to be the main part
that is used (for the colour I guess). They are about the size and thickness
of rhubarb.

Last year I also purchased a fairly new variety of miniature white turnip in
the veggie section, the "root" only grows into small gobes, rather like
those little round, red radishes. Yes, it is completely white, thin-skinned
and great if the raw turnip is finely sliced into a salad or stir fry. They
are just a little peppery, crisp and crunchy. We loved them.

There are just so many delicious new items now available in supermarkets in
Oz. Have you tried the marinated button mushrooms, or those teeny weeny
little pickled gerkins? And of course there are the small lebanese cucumbers
with their thin skins, for salads, and the asian "egg plants" like little
black sausages, for italian dishes.

Ooooooooh, the food, the food!!!!!

And all so low carb too.

Annette
Now you have made me feel hungry!!!!! What's for dinner, I ask my SO? Heh
heh.


Hi Annette and Julie

We grow Fordhhok giants.

Now you know why I added:

"And anything else I may have forgotten that you like or Quentin
suggested:-)" to my original stir-fry ingredients list. There are so
many veges out there. But I tried to include many of the things Quentin
recommended such as onion, garlic, yellow capsicum, beans etc. The
turmeric is something I use a lot because of advice on my cancer list.

Effectively, add whatever you like that's in season but maintain the
core items. Sometimes you may need to check the cooking method or timing
to add it to the mix.

Mushrooms, to me, are the perfect weight-loss diet food (add them late,
like tomatoes). Taste good and almost zero carbs and calories/kj,
provided you don't drown them in oil when you cook them.


Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia.
Remove weight and carbs to email.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.


  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2004, 09:50 AM
Alan
 
Posts: n/a
Default

On Sun, 19 Sep 2004 18:21:49 +1000, "Annette"
wrote:


"Julie Bove" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

I've been looking
for a particular leafy vegetable that comes in some packaged salads. It
looks like a small spinach leaf with a beet red strip down the center. I
think it might be baby swiss chard. At any rate, my daughter loves the
stuff and I can't seem to find those leaves just by themselves. I'm

hoping
I can grow some next summer.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm



Those are simply the leaves of immature red beets. That's why they have
that red vein down the centre. If you can grow your own beets, then you can
pick some of the little leaves for use in salads or stir frys. Beets are
dead easy to grow, you can pick leaves for your daughter, ( just one or two
from each plant), and still have the beets to eat as well! They don't seem
to mind the loss of one or two leaves. I suppose it is possible to do the
same with the yellow ones too!

And Alan, it looks like those plant breeders have now released some new
versions of our old silver beet, and developed the red and bright yellow
beets for leaf production, instead of the swollen root that we call "beets".
I saw them in BiLo just the other day. The stalks seem to be the main part
that is used (for the colour I guess). They are about the size and thickness
of rhubarb.

Last year I also purchased a fairly new variety of miniature white turnip in
the veggie section, the "root" only grows into small gobes, rather like
those little round, red radishes. Yes, it is completely white, thin-skinned
and great if the raw turnip is finely sliced into a salad or stir fry. They
are just a little peppery, crisp and crunchy. We loved them.

There are just so many delicious new items now available in supermarkets in
Oz. Have you tried the marinated button mushrooms, or those teeny weeny
little pickled gerkins? And of course there are the small lebanese cucumbers
with their thin skins, for salads, and the asian "egg plants" like little
black sausages, for italian dishes.

Ooooooooh, the food, the food!!!!!

And all so low carb too.

Annette
Now you have made me feel hungry!!!!! What's for dinner, I ask my SO? Heh
heh.


Hi Annette and Julie

We grow Fordhhok giants.

Now you know why I added:

"And anything else I may have forgotten that you like or Quentin
suggested:-)" to my original stir-fry ingredients list. There are so
many veges out there. But I tried to include many of the things Quentin
recommended such as onion, garlic, yellow capsicum, beans etc. The
turmeric is something I use a lot because of advice on my cancer list.

Effectively, add whatever you like that's in season but maintain the
core items. Sometimes you may need to check the cooking method or timing
to add it to the mix.

Mushrooms, to me, are the perfect weight-loss diet food (add them late,
like tomatoes). Taste good and almost zero carbs and calories/kj,
provided you don't drown them in oil when you cook them.


Cheers, Alan, T2 d&e, Australia.
Remove weight and carbs to email.
--
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2004, 10:39 AM
Tiger Lily
 
Posts: n/a
Default

orange capsicum is the best anti-oxidant member of the bell pepper family
better than yellow, red or green

just an fyi

--
Join us in the Diabetic-Talk Chatroom on UnderNet
/server irc.undernet.org --- /join #Diabetic-Talk
More info: http://www.diabetic-talk.org/


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2004, 10:39 AM
Tiger Lily
 
Posts: n/a
Default

orange capsicum is the best anti-oxidant member of the bell pepper family
better than yellow, red or green

just an fyi

--
Join us in the Diabetic-Talk Chatroom on UnderNet
/server irc.undernet.org --- /join #Diabetic-Talk
More info: http://www.diabetic-talk.org/


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2004, 08:20 PM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Annette" wrote in message
...

Those are simply the leaves of immature red beets. That's why they have
that red vein down the centre. If you can grow your own beets, then you

can
pick some of the little leaves for use in salads or stir frys. Beets are
dead easy to grow, you can pick leaves for your daughter, ( just one or

two
from each plant), and still have the beets to eat as well! They don't

seem
to mind the loss of one or two leaves. I suppose it is possible to do the
same with the yellow ones too!


Really? Hmmm... I don't recall beet greens being listed on the package,
but I'll look again. Will also try to find out if beets will grow in this
area. I've never tried to. I love them, but nobody else in the family
does.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm





  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2004, 08:20 PM
Julie Bove
 
Posts: n/a
Default




"Annette" wrote in message
...

Those are simply the leaves of immature red beets. That's why they have
that red vein down the centre. If you can grow your own beets, then you

can
pick some of the little leaves for use in salads or stir frys. Beets are
dead easy to grow, you can pick leaves for your daughter, ( just one or

two
from each plant), and still have the beets to eat as well! They don't

seem
to mind the loss of one or two leaves. I suppose it is possible to do the
same with the yellow ones too!


Really? Hmmm... I don't recall beet greens being listed on the package,
but I'll look again. Will also try to find out if beets will grow in this
area. I've never tried to. I love them, but nobody else in the family
does.

--
See my webpage:
http://mysite.verizon.net/juliebove/index.htm





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