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Old 13-09-2005, 08:46 PM
 
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Default restaurant equipment recommendation

I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the Dayton-Cininnati, Ohio
area. We are looking for recommendations on companies to supply us with
kitchen and front area equipment (purchase and/or lease) and supplies.

Any suggestions?

Scott



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Old 13-09-2005, 09:17 PM
Vox Humana
 
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wrote in message
...
I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the Dayton-Cininnati,

Ohio
area. We are looking for recommendations on companies to supply us with
kitchen and front area equipment (purchase and/or lease) and supplies.

Any suggestions?

Scott


Wasserstrom. Headquarters in Columbus. Stores in Dayton and Cincinnati
http://www.wasserstrom.com/


  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 13-09-2005, 10:15 PM
Ward Abbott
 
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On Tue, 13 Sep 2005 15:46:55 -0400, wrote:

I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the Dayton-Cininnati, Ohio
area.


If you are a professional associated with a start up....you must
already know the answers to these questions.


If you don't.....get out of the restaurant business...right now! YOU
are about to loose your shirt, pants and jock strap in one swoop!

  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-09-2005, 02:18 PM
Jumping Jack Flash
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the Dayton-Cininnati,
Ohio
area.


If you are a professional associated with a start up....you must
already know the answers to these questions.


If you don't.....get out of the restaurant business...right now! YOU
are about to loose your shirt, pants and jock strap in one swoop!


Bravo!!! Couldn't have said it better. I am in the Restaurant Equipment
business, and I can spot a potential failure within 5 minutes of an initial
meeting. The common thread is that they don't know what they're getting
into.


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Old 15-09-2005, 04:48 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Jumping Jack Flash" wrote in message
. ..
I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the Dayton-Cininnati,
Ohio
area.


If you are a professional associated with a start up....you must
already know the answers to these questions.


If you don't.....get out of the restaurant business...right now! YOU
are about to loose your shirt, pants and jock strap in one swoop!


Bravo!!! Couldn't have said it better. I am in the Restaurant Equipment
business, and I can spot a potential failure within 5 minutes of an

initial
meeting. The common thread is that they don't know what they're getting
into.


Maybe you can explain something. I see lots of tiny Asian restaurants that
pop-up here and there in my area. The people who work there seem to be new
to this county based on their command of the language. Their restaurants
seem to survive while others, even big chains, come and go. Are these
people experience restaurant operators in their native land, and then move
here with a complete set of skill and good capitalization? Is there
something in the culture that makes them successful? What surprises me also
is that I live in an area that is on the fringe of Appalachia, not an area
that has a reputation for being curious or even accepting of other cultures.
I'm a bit surprised that there is a demand for Asian food, yet there is an
Asian buffet in every strip center.




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Old 15-09-2005, 05:31 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Jumping Jack Flash" wrote in message
. ..
I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the Dayton-Cininnati,
Ohio
area.

If you are a professional associated with a start up....you must
already know the answers to these questions.


If you don't.....get out of the restaurant business...right now! YOU
are about to loose your shirt, pants and jock strap in one swoop!


Bravo!!! Couldn't have said it better. I am in the Restaurant Equipment
business, and I can spot a potential failure within 5 minutes of an

initial
meeting. The common thread is that they don't know what they're getting
into.


Maybe you can explain something. I see lots of tiny Asian restaurants
that
pop-up here and there in my area. The people who work there seem to be
new
to this county based on their command of the language. Their restaurants
seem to survive while others, even big chains, come and go. Are these
people experience restaurant operators in their native land, and then move
here with a complete set of skill and good capitalization? Is there
something in the culture that makes them successful? What surprises me
also
is that I live in an area that is on the fringe of Appalachia, not an area
that has a reputation for being curious or even accepting of other
cultures.
I'm a bit surprised that there is a demand for Asian food, yet there is an
Asian buffet in every strip center.

I've observed what you are saying and have mused until I came up with this
answer; however misguided it may be.
There two Asian restaurants that are in our area that have been in business
for at least 13 years that I've been here. Most of the people that eat there
are really hearty eaters; they pile on there plates all manner of fried
foods and will eat almost anything that is breaded and deep fried. These
two restaurants are near an exit and both are near huge parking areas for
big trucks. I've seen other travelers who are passing thru that seem to
know about these restaurants (from overhearing their conversations - one
cannot help but hear!). One restaurant has remained consistent in its
quality and we have gone a few times over the years; but the other seemed a
bit unclean, so we stopped going there. But one of the main reason to me
that they stay in businesss is that there are a lot of people who pass thru
the doors who want lots of calories. I note that not many have the seaweed
strips (salad) or kimchee, but I get all the pink ginger slices I want
because no one else seems to take them.
Dee Dee


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-09-2005, 06:28 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Jumping Jack Flash" wrote in message
. ..
I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the

Dayton-Cininnati,
Ohio
area.

If you are a professional associated with a start up....you must
already know the answers to these questions.


If you don't.....get out of the restaurant business...right now!

YOU
are about to loose your shirt, pants and jock strap in one swoop!

Bravo!!! Couldn't have said it better. I am in the Restaurant Equipment
business, and I can spot a potential failure within 5 minutes of an

initial
meeting. The common thread is that they don't know what they're getting
into.


Maybe you can explain something. I see lots of tiny Asian restaurants
that
pop-up here and there in my area. The people who work there seem to be
new
to this county based on their command of the language. Their

restaurants
seem to survive while others, even big chains, come and go. Are these
people experience restaurant operators in their native land, and then

move
here with a complete set of skill and good capitalization? Is there
something in the culture that makes them successful? What surprises me
also
is that I live in an area that is on the fringe of Appalachia, not an

area
that has a reputation for being curious or even accepting of other
cultures.
I'm a bit surprised that there is a demand for Asian food, yet there is

an
Asian buffet in every strip center.

I've observed what you are saying and have mused until I came up with this
answer; however misguided it may be.
There two Asian restaurants that are in our area that have been in

business
for at least 13 years that I've been here. Most of the people that eat

there
are really hearty eaters; they pile on there plates all manner of fried
foods and will eat almost anything that is breaded and deep fried. These
two restaurants are near an exit and both are near huge parking areas for
big trucks. I've seen other travelers who are passing thru that seem to
know about these restaurants (from overhearing their conversations - one
cannot help but hear!). One restaurant has remained consistent in its
quality and we have gone a few times over the years; but the other seemed

a
bit unclean, so we stopped going there. But one of the main reason to me
that they stay in businesss is that there are a lot of people who pass

thru
the doors who want lots of calories. I note that not many have the seaweed
strips (salad) or kimchee, but I get all the pink ginger slices I want
because no one else seems to take them.
Dee Dee


I think that is true for the buffet format restaurants in general. We have
three Asian buffets in our small suburban area which until recently was on
the fringe of civilization. There are also two "steak" buffets, Ryan's and
Golden Corral. The Appalachian Highway starts here and cuts across the least
populated and poorest area of the state. I think that some of the patrons
may be from the freeway but a lot of them are from the east, where there is
little but feed mills and farm supply stores. All the buffets are always
jammed, but the food is poor in my opinion and the cleanliness is marginal.
I am generally put-off by buffets. One only has to sit back and observer for
a while to see stomach-turning behavior. People cough into their hands and
then pick up the serving utensils. Other graze from the buffet, licking
their fingers and then plunging them into containers of food. And don't get
me started about the kids! People let their kids go wild at these places.
I have seen kids do unmentionable things and the parents seem oblivious.
Considering that the food all comes from boxes and cans, I can get a better
meal at home and don't have to worry about the possibility that some little
darling licked the serving spoon and then put it back into the salad
dressing.


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-09-2005, 06:52 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you for the information. I will take a look at their site!

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

wrote in message
...
I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the Dayton-Cininnati,

Ohio
area. We are looking for recommendations on companies to supply us with
kitchen and front area equipment (purchase and/or lease) and supplies.

Any suggestions?

Scott


Wasserstrom. Headquarters in Columbus. Stores in Dayton and Cincinnati
http://www.wasserstrom.com/




  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-09-2005, 07:19 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you both.

- if you work for a company in greater Cin-Day, I would
love to see what you have to offer. We are trying to use local companies as
much as is practical.

I also appreciate and value your caution.


"Jumping Jack Flash" wrote in message
. ..
I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the Dayton-Cininnati,
Ohio
area.


If you are a professional associated with a start up....you must
already know the answers to these questions.


If you don't.....get out of the restaurant business...right now! YOU
are about to loose your shirt, pants and jock strap in one swoop!


Bravo!!! Couldn't have said it better. I am in the Restaurant Equipment
business, and I can spot a potential failure within 5 minutes of an
initial meeting. The common thread is that they don't know what they're
getting into.



  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-09-2005, 07:33 PM
 
Posts: n/a
Default

I think these sorts of Asian restraurants also make great use of available
labor and special relationships with their suppliers- and even their
landlords if they lease their space. The staff/owners also seem to
tolerate financial/material elements many other restaurants and businesses
would never accept. I suspect they represent a successful business model
that has a lot to offer.

Thank you for your input!

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Jumping Jack Flash" wrote in message
. ..
I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the

Dayton-Cininnati,
Ohio
area.

If you are a professional associated with a start up....you must
already know the answers to these questions.


If you don't.....get out of the restaurant business...right now!

YOU
are about to loose your shirt, pants and jock strap in one swoop!

Bravo!!! Couldn't have said it better. I am in the Restaurant
Equipment
business, and I can spot a potential failure within 5 minutes of an
initial
meeting. The common thread is that they don't know what they're
getting
into.

Maybe you can explain something. I see lots of tiny Asian restaurants
that
pop-up here and there in my area. The people who work there seem to be
new
to this county based on their command of the language. Their

restaurants
seem to survive while others, even big chains, come and go. Are these
people experience restaurant operators in their native land, and then

move
here with a complete set of skill and good capitalization? Is there
something in the culture that makes them successful? What surprises me
also
is that I live in an area that is on the fringe of Appalachia, not an

area
that has a reputation for being curious or even accepting of other
cultures.
I'm a bit surprised that there is a demand for Asian food, yet there is

an
Asian buffet in every strip center.

I've observed what you are saying and have mused until I came up with
this
answer; however misguided it may be.
There two Asian restaurants that are in our area that have been in

business
for at least 13 years that I've been here. Most of the people that eat

there
are really hearty eaters; they pile on there plates all manner of fried
foods and will eat almost anything that is breaded and deep fried. These
two restaurants are near an exit and both are near huge parking areas for
big trucks. I've seen other travelers who are passing thru that seem to
know about these restaurants (from overhearing their conversations - one
cannot help but hear!). One restaurant has remained consistent in its
quality and we have gone a few times over the years; but the other seemed

a
bit unclean, so we stopped going there. But one of the main reason to me
that they stay in businesss is that there are a lot of people who pass

thru
the doors who want lots of calories. I note that not many have the
seaweed
strips (salad) or kimchee, but I get all the pink ginger slices I want
because no one else seems to take them.
Dee Dee


I think that is true for the buffet format restaurants in general. We
have
three Asian buffets in our small suburban area which until recently was on
the fringe of civilization. There are also two "steak" buffets, Ryan's
and
Golden Corral. The Appalachian Highway starts here and cuts across the
least
populated and poorest area of the state. I think that some of the patrons
may be from the freeway but a lot of them are from the east, where there
is
little but feed mills and farm supply stores. All the buffets are always
jammed, but the food is poor in my opinion and the cleanliness is
marginal.
I am generally put-off by buffets. One only has to sit back and observer
for
a while to see stomach-turning behavior. People cough into their hands
and
then pick up the serving utensils. Other graze from the buffet, licking
their fingers and then plunging them into containers of food. And don't
get
me started about the kids! People let their kids go wild at these places.
I have seen kids do unmentionable things and the parents seem oblivious.
Considering that the food all comes from boxes and cans, I can get a
better
meal at home and don't have to worry about the possibility that some
little
darling licked the serving spoon and then put it back into the salad
dressing.






  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 15-09-2005, 07:47 PM
Jumping Jack Flash
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Maybe you can explain something. I see lots of tiny Asian restaurants
that
pop-up here and there in my area. The people who work there seem to be
new
to this county based on their command of the language. Their restaurants
seem to survive while others, even big chains, come and go.


Well, just a theory, but here's what I think. Historically, people who are
new to our country are willing to work harder, and accept a lower standard
of living. They are more likely to be willing to put in 80 hours a week and
"get by" than most born Americans. What would be interesting would be to see
how any of these places make it to a second generation. Also, many of these
places are small, carry out type places that can operate on low overhead.
The people I have talked to about starting up a restaurant (and this may be
due to the nature of my company) tend to be looking for a more traditional
"sit down" style operation. They always have "great family recipes", and
often put in time as a server somewhere in their high school days.

Of course, it should be said that many people DO know what they are getting
into, and have a great deal of success.

There are more independent Chinese Restaurants in the US than there are
MacDonald's.


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-09-2005, 12:29 AM
Matthew L. Martin
 
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Default

Vox Humana wrote:
"Jumping Jack Flash" wrote in message
. ..

I am involved in the start-up of a restaurant in the Dayton-Cininnati,
Ohio
area.

If you are a professional associated with a start up....you must
already know the answers to these questions.


If you don't.....get out of the restaurant business...right now! YOU
are about to loose your shirt, pants and jock strap in one swoop!


Bravo!!! Couldn't have said it better. I am in the Restaurant Equipment
business, and I can spot a potential failure within 5 minutes of an


initial

meeting. The common thread is that they don't know what they're getting
into.



Maybe you can explain something. I see lots of tiny Asian restaurants that
pop-up here and there in my area. The people who work there seem to be new
to this county based on their command of the language. Their restaurants
seem to survive while others, even big chains, come and go.


A generation or two ago, you could substitute Greek for Asian and House
of Pizza for restaurant and you would have described what happened here
in Massachusetts.

The typical case was for the patriarch to immigrate and work in a pizza
parlor owned by a relative, distant or otherwise. After a few years of
saving and sending money back to Greece, they would bring a son over and
open their own House of Pizza. Both would work day and night, sending
money back to Greece while improving their business. Another child would
come to America, work in the House of Pizza and help send more money
back to Greece.

Eventually the whole family was here. The older children worked in the
House of Pizza, the young ones went to school. As the family business
got better, they would often open a second pizza parlor. In the town of
Spencer Ma in the mid '80s I saw this whole scenario play out. At one
point the same family owned three pizza parlors in a town of 10,000 and
competed successfully with three other pizza parlors, also family owned.

In the early '90s Pizza the Hut came to town. They lasted about two
years before they had close their doors.

Matthew

--
Thermodynamics and/or Golf for dummies: There is a game
You can't win
You can't break even
You can't get out of the game
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-09-2005, 01:00 AM
Bruce
 
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Default

On Thu, 15 Sep 2005 15:48:28 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:

Maybe you can explain something. I see lots of tiny Asian restaurants that
pop-up here and there in my area. The people who work there seem to be new
to this county based on their command of the language. Their restaurants
seem to survive while others, even big chains, come and go. Are these
people experience restaurant operators in their native land, and then move
here with a complete set of skill and good capitalization? Is there
something in the culture that makes them successful? What surprises me also
is that I live in an area that is on the fringe of Appalachia, not an area
that has a reputation for being curious or even accepting of other cultures.
I'm a bit surprised that there is a demand for Asian food, yet there is an
Asian buffet in every strip center.


My Hypothesis

1. Family owned and operated. All family members contribute by
working hard without near the headaches and hassles of having to hire
"employees".

2. The owners watch their expenses in the business and their personal
lives. They live cheaply and work hard to pass success on to the next
generation.

3. Culturally, especially for immigrants they are willing to put forth
effort to make a living. They are not necessarily trying to make
enough money to buy big houses and fancy cars. They live simply.

4. Asian restaurants are able to use fillers that increases profit
margins. Rice, chicken, noodles, etc.

5. They may also be cutting some corners on family members who are
tipped by not declaring the money for tax purposes.

6. Family members may work when they are underage. Children can do
some jobs in a family restaurant that would not be tolerated in other
restaurants.

Bruce








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