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Old 01-01-2009, 12:59 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker

Two days before Christmas our 30 year old pizzele maker died. This is
tragic as my wife's pizzeles are a prized gift that many look forward to
every years. She makes three or four types (vanilla, chocolate, anise, and
this year orange)

A friend offered hers (used only once) and we tried it. No go. Most of the
brands of pizzele/waffle makers in the stores are crap. The pizzele is too
thick, the waffle portion is not deep enough, etc. We have standards to
uphold! The original was made by C. Palmer Manufacturing and that is what I
want. None to be found locally.

I ordered the Model 1000 from www.fantes.com as they are a good outfit and
it was $15 cheaper than other places. We were amazed that it is exactly the
same as it was made 30 years ago. Still made in the USA, still high
quality. Some people do care.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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Old 01-01-2009, 02:47 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker


"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
news
Two days before Christmas our 30 year old pizzele maker died. This is
tragic as my wife's pizzeles are a prized gift that many look forward to
every years. She makes three or four types (vanilla, chocolate, anise, and
this year orange)

A friend offered hers (used only once) and we tried it. No go. Most of the
brands of pizzele/waffle makers in the stores are crap. The pizzele is
too thick, the waffle portion is not deep enough, etc. We have standards
to uphold! The original was made by C. Palmer Manufacturing and that is
what I want. None to be found locally.

I ordered the Model 1000 from www.fantes.com as they are a good outfit
and it was $15 cheaper than other places. We were amazed that it is
exactly the same as it was made 30 years ago. Still made in the USA,
still high quality. Some people do care.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



Fantes can be that very place to find quality products, too, I have found,
reasonably priced, and shipping pretty good.

30 years ago, too, (well almost) when I lived in Hawaii I had a hankering
to buy a pizzelle maker, but I can't remember why it was on my mind. This
is how I got it - a guy my husband worked with had his mother go to Sears,
pick it up (it could have been a Presto brand), and pack it in her bags when
she flew over to visit. My, how transportation has changed for me!

But I was soooo disappointed with it, that even though I tried it a few more
times, the unit got dismissed somewhere along the line. My point: I'm
sympathizing with you about losing your original, because indeed most
appliances ARE not that great.

I notice on fantes' site that the VillaWare manufacture brands were
discontinued. I would probably have overlooked the Palmer, and gone for
VillaWare, as I love my VillaWare panini grill.

I noticed after looking at the recipes included, there is/was a model that
was non-stick. I can't see that it was an offering at Fantes, but did you
consider a non-stick in Palmer? The PDF recipes that you can click on were
definitely outdated: calling for "oleo" :-)) and crisco, of course, with
recipe for 12 dozen. That tickled me.

Made in USA and upholding a standard and not price jabbing; Great!

Dee Dee







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Old 01-01-2009, 03:16 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker


"Dee Randall" wrote in message

Fantes can be that very place to find quality products, too, I have found,
reasonably priced, and shipping pretty good.

30 years ago, too, (well almost) when I lived in Hawaii I had a hankering
to buy a pizzelle maker, but I can't remember why it was on my mind. This
is how I got it - a guy my husband worked with had his mother go to Sears,
pick it up (it could have been a Presto brand), and pack it in her bags
when she flew over to visit. My, how transportation has changed for me!

But I was soooo disappointed with it, that even though I tried it a few
more times, the unit got dismissed somewhere along the line. My point:
I'm sympathizing with you about losing your original, because indeed most
appliances ARE not that great.

I notice on fantes' site that the VillaWare manufacture brands were
discontinued. I would probably have overlooked the Palmer, and gone for
VillaWare, as I love my VillaWare panini grill.

I noticed after looking at the recipes included, there is/was a model that
was non-stick. I can't see that it was an offering at Fantes, but did you
consider a non-stick in Palmer? The PDF recipes that you can click on
were definitely outdated: calling for "oleo" :-)) and crisco, of course,
with recipe for 12 dozen. That tickled me.

Made in USA and upholding a standard and not price jabbing; Great!

Dee Dee


When we lived in Philly, we'd go to Fantes once in a while for kitchen
stuff. Good selection and fair prices.

We don't see any need for nonstick as properly seasoned, the waffle does not
stick at all. Often, things don't seem as crispy with a Teflon coating so
why take chances? Below is the recipe my wife uses. It keeps a few days in
the refrigerator if you mix it in advance. We usually put the pizzelle iron
on a table in the family room and watch TV while making them.

Pizzelles





Ingredients:



6 eggs at room temperature

1 1/3 cups sugar

1/2 lb margarine, softened

4 cups flour

1 T baking powder

3 T vanilla or 2 T anise





Beat eggs, adding sugar gradually. Beat until smooth.



Add melted margarine and vanilla. Sift flour and baking powder together and
add to the egg mixture.



Mix until smooth batter is sticky but loose enough to be dropped by spoon.





Makes 80 to 100



Optional: Crush anise seed with mortar and pestle and add to
mixture.

Add cocoa mix to make a chocolate version









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Old 01-01-2009, 03:29 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker


"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...

"Dee Randall" wrote in message

Fantes can be that very place to find quality products, too, I have
found, reasonably priced, and shipping pretty good.

30 years ago, too, (well almost) when I lived in Hawaii I had a
hankering to buy a pizzelle maker, but I can't remember why it was on my
mind. This is how I got it - a guy my husband worked with had his mother
go to Sears, pick it up (it could have been a Presto brand), and pack it
in her bags when she flew over to visit. My, how transportation has
changed for me!

But I was soooo disappointed with it, that even though I tried it a few
more times, the unit got dismissed somewhere along the line. My point:
I'm sympathizing with you about losing your original, because indeed most
appliances ARE not that great.

I notice on fantes' site that the VillaWare manufacture brands were
discontinued. I would probably have overlooked the Palmer, and gone for
VillaWare, as I love my VillaWare panini grill.

I noticed after looking at the recipes included, there is/was a model
that was non-stick. I can't see that it was an offering at Fantes, but
did you consider a non-stick in Palmer? The PDF recipes that you can
click on were definitely outdated: calling for "oleo" :-)) and crisco,
of course, with recipe for 12 dozen. That tickled me.

Made in USA and upholding a standard and not price jabbing; Great!

Dee Dee


When we lived in Philly, we'd go to Fantes once in a while for kitchen
stuff. Good selection and fair prices.

We don't see any need for nonstick as properly seasoned, the waffle does
not stick at all. Often, things don't seem as crispy with a Teflon
coating so why take chances? Below is the recipe my wife uses. It keeps
a few days in the refrigerator if you mix it in advance. We usually put
the pizzelle iron on a table in the family room and watch TV while making
them.

Pizzelles





Ingredients:



6 eggs at room temperature

1 1/3 cups sugar

1/2 lb margarine, softened

4 cups flour

1 T baking powder

3 T vanilla or 2 T anise





Beat eggs, adding sugar gradually. Beat until smooth.



Add melted margarine and vanilla. Sift flour and baking powder together
and add to the egg mixture.



Mix until smooth batter is sticky but loose enough to be dropped by spoon.





Makes 80 to 100



Optional: Crush anise seed with mortar and pestle and add to
mixture.

Add cocoa mix to make a chocolate version



Thanks, Ed. I agree with you on the non-stick. I was going to ask for your
wife's recipe, but didn't want to push it -- I thank you for including it.
Dee Dee


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Old 01-01-2009, 05:20 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker


Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Two days before Christmas our 30 year old pizzele maker died. This is
tragic as my wife's pizzeles are a prized gift that many look forward to
every years. She makes three or four types (vanilla, chocolate, anise, and
this year orange)

A friend offered hers (used only once) and we tried it. No go. Most of the
brands of pizzele/waffle makers in the stores are crap. The pizzele is too
thick, the waffle portion is not deep enough, etc. We have standards to
uphold! The original was made by C. Palmer Manufacturing and that is what I
want. None to be found locally.

I ordered the Model 1000 from www.fantes.com as they are a good outfit and
it was $15 cheaper than other places. We were amazed that it is exactly the
same as it was made 30 years ago. Still made in the USA, still high
quality. Some people do care.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/


What exactly died in the old one? There isn't much to them and what
could potentially die is pretty easy to repair or replace. Power cord,
thermostat, heating element is about it and all can be readily sourced
from an appliance parts place.

Too many folks are stuck in the wasteful "just throw it out and get a
new one" mentality. I'm no tree hugger, but I'll only throw something
out and replace it in two cases, first if the dead item was inadequate
to begin with, or second if a repair is truly hopeless.


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Old 01-01-2009, 05:48 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker

On Thu, 01 Jan 2009 11:20:58 -0600, "Pete C."
wrote:


Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Two days before Christmas our 30 year old pizzele maker died. This is
tragic as my wife's pizzeles are a prized gift that many look forward to
every years. She makes three or four types (vanilla, chocolate, anise, and
this year orange)

A friend offered hers (used only once) and we tried it. No go. Most of the
brands of pizzele/waffle makers in the stores are crap. The pizzele is too
thick, the waffle portion is not deep enough, etc. We have standards to
uphold! The original was made by C. Palmer Manufacturing and that is what I
want. None to be found locally.

I ordered the Model 1000 from www.fantes.com as they are a good outfit and
it was $15 cheaper than other places. We were amazed that it is exactly the
same as it was made 30 years ago. Still made in the USA, still high
quality. Some people do care.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/


What exactly died in the old one? There isn't much to them and what
could potentially die is pretty easy to repair or replace. Power cord,
thermostat, heating element is about it and all can be readily sourced
from an appliance parts place.

Too many folks are stuck in the wasteful "just throw it out and get a
new one" mentality. I'm no tree hugger, but I'll only throw something
out and replace it in two cases, first if the dead item was inadequate
to begin with, or second if a repair is truly hopeless.


You are lucky to be able to fix everything yourself. Not everyone
can. And even if you can, the cost of repairs can be more than the
cost of a new one, sometime several times.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)
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Old 01-01-2009, 06:19 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker

In article ,
"Ed Pawlowski" wrote:

Two days before Christmas our 30 year old pizzele maker died.


What "died" in it? Was it the heating element broke? I have repaired
my vintage waffle maker when it's top plate element broke. If your
handy (and not necessarily hadsome, but that's a different subject), it
isn't difficult.

And if you're just going to throw it out, I pay for shipping for you to
send it to me. That is one "toy" I don't hve yet. And I bet these
would work for making waffle cones also.

jt
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Old 01-01-2009, 07:01 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker

On Thu, 01 Jan 2009 18:19:10 GMT, jt august wrote:

In article ,
"Ed Pawlowski" wrote:

Two days before Christmas our 30 year old pizzele maker died.


What "died" in it? Was it the heating element broke? I have repaired
my vintage waffle maker when it's top plate element broke. If your
handy (and not necessarily hadsome, but that's a different subject), it
isn't difficult.

And if you're just going to throw it out, I pay for shipping for you to
send it to me. That is one "toy" I don't hve yet. And I bet these
would work for making waffle cones also.

jt



I am planning to use the waffle cone make we have to try some
pizzeles. A neighbor of a relative I used to visit made some when I
was there. I always got a plastic bag of them when I left. Usually
90% crumbs by the time I got to the airport, but they were good.
--
Susan N.

"Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)
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Old 01-01-2009, 08:44 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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"Pete C." wrote in message

What exactly died in the old one? There isn't much to them and what
could potentially die is pretty easy to repair or replace. Power cord,
thermostat, heating element is about it and all can be readily sourced
from an appliance parts place.

Too many folks are stuck in the wasteful "just throw it out and get a
new one" mentality. I'm no tree hugger, but I'll only throw something
out and replace it in two cases, first if the dead item was inadequate
to begin with, or second if a repair is truly hopeless.


The old one is repaired. It was the power cord inside the unit that became
brittle with years of use I was able to cut the cord, strip the end,
replace the protective sleeves and crank it up again. I'm not so sure how
long it will last once I stressed the connectors on the heating elements,
thus the new one.


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Old 01-01-2009, 11:52 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker


Ed Pawlowski wrote:

"Pete C." wrote in message

What exactly died in the old one? There isn't much to them and what
could potentially die is pretty easy to repair or replace. Power cord,
thermostat, heating element is about it and all can be readily sourced
from an appliance parts place.

Too many folks are stuck in the wasteful "just throw it out and get a
new one" mentality. I'm no tree hugger, but I'll only throw something
out and replace it in two cases, first if the dead item was inadequate
to begin with, or second if a repair is truly hopeless.


The old one is repaired. It was the power cord inside the unit that became
brittle with years of use I was able to cut the cord, strip the end,
replace the protective sleeves and crank it up again. I'm not so sure how
long it will last once I stressed the connectors on the heating elements,
thus the new one.


Good to hear it was repaired


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Old 01-01-2009, 11:55 PM posted to rec.food.equipment
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Default Pizzele maker


The Cook wrote:

On Thu, 01 Jan 2009 11:20:58 -0600, "Pete C."
wrote:


Ed Pawlowski wrote:

Two days before Christmas our 30 year old pizzele maker died. This is
tragic as my wife's pizzeles are a prized gift that many look forward to
every years. She makes three or four types (vanilla, chocolate, anise, and
this year orange)

A friend offered hers (used only once) and we tried it. No go. Most of the
brands of pizzele/waffle makers in the stores are crap. The pizzele is too
thick, the waffle portion is not deep enough, etc. We have standards to
uphold! The original was made by C. Palmer Manufacturing and that is what I
want. None to be found locally.

I ordered the Model 1000 from www.fantes.com as they are a good outfit and
it was $15 cheaper than other places. We were amazed that it is exactly the
same as it was made 30 years ago. Still made in the USA, still high
quality. Some people do care.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/


What exactly died in the old one? There isn't much to them and what
could potentially die is pretty easy to repair or replace. Power cord,
thermostat, heating element is about it and all can be readily sourced
from an appliance parts place.

Too many folks are stuck in the wasteful "just throw it out and get a
new one" mentality. I'm no tree hugger, but I'll only throw something
out and replace it in two cases, first if the dead item was inadequate
to begin with, or second if a repair is truly hopeless.


You are lucky to be able to fix everything yourself. Not everyone
can. And even if you can, the cost of repairs can be more than the
cost of a new one, sometime several times.


The economics depend on the item being repaired and your repair
abilities, but most of the time the repair costs less than the
replacement. I had a motorized damper door on my fridge fail (plastic
door broke), the replacement assembly that contained the damper door was
something like $160. I fabricated a replacement door in my shop in about
30 min from scrap materials and it's worked perfectly ever since.


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