Coffee (rec.drink.coffee) Discussing coffee. This includes selection of brands, methods of making coffee, etc. Discussion about coffee in other forms (e.g. desserts) is acceptable.

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Old 01-06-2005, 10:03 AM
Gene
 
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Default Vacuum containers for beans

I have tried several different vacuum containers to hold my beans, but
have not been completely satisfied with any. Does anyone have a
sure-fire container he/she could recommend? Thanks!
-Gene


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Old 02-06-2005, 11:05 AM
Ivo van der Putten
 
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"Gene" schreef in bericht
oups.com...
I have tried several different vacuum containers to hold my beans, but
have not been completely satisfied with any. Does anyone have a
sure-fire container he/she could recommend? Thanks!
-Gene


I presume you want to store roasted beans.
If you use a heavy vacuum, you will force oily and aromatic substances out
of the bean, thus accelerating ageing.
Are you sure you want to do that?

Ivo


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Old 03-06-2005, 11:36 AM
Gene
 
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Correct regarding my wish to store roasted beans. My understanding was
that the enemies of freshness are air, light and humidity, and that the
best way to fight these was to store the beans short-term in an
air-tight, light free container at room temperature. Is the creation of
a vacuum in the container over-kill?

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Old 03-06-2005, 11:58 PM
Graham Sorenson
 
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"Gene" wrote in message
oups.com...
Correct regarding my wish to store roasted beans. My understanding was
that the enemies of freshness are air, light and humidity, and that the
best way to fight these was to store the beans short-term in an
air-tight, light free container at room temperature. Is the creation of
a vacuum in the container over-kill?


You might like to look into "Nitrogen flushing" The enemy of losing flavour
is oxidation and if you van remove the oxygen they you don't have the
problem. (Not long term but long enough)

Nitrogen is heaver than oxygen so if you "flush" the container with nitrogen
gas then there is no oxygen in it to oxidise the coffee oils.

I have used this to preserve the oils that I use in my business.

you can probably get the nitrogen from a good wine shop in small canisters.

HTH

--
Graham Sorenson

http://Luna-Aromatics.com Come and stick your nose in our business
The Home of "Arizona Balm" the Natural Solution to Problem Dry Skin.
Hand Made Soaps, Soy Wax Candles, Lip Balms and more Good Stuff
Retail and Wholesale.
http://TheGuideToAromatherapy.com


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Old 04-06-2005, 12:51 PM
Jim Kurck
 
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Dear Mr. Sorenson,

Pardon me for butting in, but your posting contains a statement that I
believe set generations of dead chemistry teachers spinning in their
graves. In order that they might once again have peace, I write to point
it out.

In article ,
"Graham Sorenson" wrote:
[...]
Nitrogen is heaver than oxygen so if you "flush" the container with nitrogen
gas then there is no oxygen in it to oxidise the coffee oils.


While nitrogen flushing does indeed prevent oxidation, nitrogen is in
fact lighter than oxygen. The molecular weight of nitrogen is 28 grams;
the molecular weight of oxygen, 32 grams.

Nitrogen flushing eliminates oxygen, and hence oxygenation. But not for
the reason you gave.

Yours in the service of compulsiveness and fresh coffee,

Jim
--
Jim Kurck
professional faultfinder "Computing is full of
Macintosh partisan second-rate physicists"
second-rate physicist - R. W. Hamming


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Old 25-08-2005, 01:35 PM
Claus Trillingsgaard
 
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If you just let them be for a little while, the CO2 emitted from fresh
roasted beans is going to 'flush' the O2 out - even N2 should you find the
habit of nitrogen flushing appealing... Even a vaccum is not going to be
sustained for long as the gasses emitted from the beans obviously contradict
this...

Keep them air tight, pitch black and cool, and remember to consume within 9
days and you will have the optimum taste. If you need to store them longer,
put them in airtight bags/containers and drop them in a freezer... make sure
that they reach room temperature before you open the bags, to avoid
condensation. Eventually pack them in smaller bags, containing 2-3 days of
consumption.

Kind regards,
Claus
"Graham Sorenson" wrote in message
...

"Gene" wrote in message
oups.com...
Correct regarding my wish to store roasted beans. My understanding was
that the enemies of freshness are air, light and humidity, and that the
best way to fight these was to store the beans short-term in an
air-tight, light free container at room temperature. Is the creation of
a vacuum in the container over-kill?


You might like to look into "Nitrogen flushing" The enemy of losing
flavour
is oxidation and if you van remove the oxygen they you don't have the
problem. (Not long term but long enough)

Nitrogen is heaver than oxygen so if you "flush" the container with
nitrogen
gas then there is no oxygen in it to oxidise the coffee oils.

I have used this to preserve the oils that I use in my business.

you can probably get the nitrogen from a good wine shop in small
canisters.

HTH

--
Graham Sorenson

http://Luna-Aromatics.com Come and stick your nose in our business
The Home of "Arizona Balm" the Natural Solution to Problem Dry Skin.
Hand Made Soaps, Soy Wax Candles, Lip Balms and more Good Stuff
Retail and Wholesale.
http://TheGuideToAromatherapy.com






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