Coffee (rec.drink.coffee) Discussing coffee. This includes selection of brands, methods of making coffee, etc. Discussion about coffee in other forms (e.g. desserts) is acceptable.

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Old 22-12-2004, 11:38 AM
 
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Default Presto, Scandinavian-designed coffeemaker



I saved some of the messages posted to these groups a few weeks ago about
the new Presto coffeemaker, a Scandinavian design featuring three separate
heating elements to guarantee the water would be near the high end of the
ideal temperature range when it hits the ground coffee in the basket. I
figured that at the $40 or so price range, it might be worth a try, so I
decided to go online and order one.

On its own website:

http://www.presto-net.com/

they wanted $69.99 plus shipping and handling. Nope--We're not buying it
there.

The next stop was the Wal-Mart website where it showed up at $39.99 plus
shipping and handling. Then, on the same page, there was a note that the
item was out of stock, was unavailable, after having been available for a
time at a "close-out" price of $27.95 or something like that. It was also
claimed to be an "online exclusive", which seemed about right, because I was
not able to find it in any Wal-Mart stores, and none o the sales people had
the foggiest idea what it was, having never heard of it.

So, Presto is not available in Wally's World. Next stop, CostCo's online
operation. They have it in stock, $35.99 for members. There is a
five-percent surcharge for buyers who are not CostCo members. Then, they
collect your state's sales tax and add on a shipping and handling charge.

This little shopping exercise happened just before midnight on Monday,
December 20. Maybe I'll have the beast on my kitchen counter some time next
week.

In the meantime, have any of you actually bought and received this Presto
machine, and what do you think of it, like and dislike about it? Is it
really a fairly decent drip machine, or just another flimsy cheaply-made
piece of junk?

Brent Reynolds, Atlanta, GA USA
Phone: 1-404-814-0768

If you yelled for 8 years, 7 months and 6 days you would
have produced enough sound energy to heat one cup of coffee.

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Old 22-12-2004, 12:30 PM
imsnowbear
 
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In article ,
wrote:

I saved some of the messages posted to these groups a few weeks ago about
the new Presto coffeemaker, a Scandinavian design featuring three separate
heating elements to guarantee the water would be near the high end of the
ideal temperature range when it hits the ground coffee in the basket. I
figured that at the $40 or so price range, it might be worth a try, so I
decided to go online and order one.

On its own website:

http://www.presto-net.com/

they wanted $69.99 plus shipping and handling. Nope--We're not buying it
there.

The next stop was the Wal-Mart website where it showed up at $39.99 plus
shipping and handling. Then, on the same page, there was a note that the
item was out of stock, was unavailable, after having been available for a
time at a "close-out" price of $27.95 or something like that. It was also
claimed to be an "online exclusive", which seemed about right, because I was
not able to find it in any Wal-Mart stores, and none o the sales people had
the foggiest idea what it was, having never heard of it.

So, Presto is not available in Wally's World. Next stop, CostCo's online
operation. They have it in stock, $35.99 for members. There is a
five-percent surcharge for buyers who are not CostCo members. Then, they
collect your state's sales tax and add on a shipping and handling charge.

This little shopping exercise happened just before midnight on Monday,
December 20. Maybe I'll have the beast on my kitchen counter some time next
week.

In the meantime, have any of you actually bought and received this Presto
machine, and what do you think of it, like and dislike about it? Is it
really a fairly decent drip machine, or just another flimsy cheaply-made
piece of junk?

Brent Reynolds, Atlanta, GA USA
Phone: 1-404-814-0768

If you yelled for 8 years, 7 months and 6 days you would
have produced enough sound energy to heat one cup of coffee.


Read all about it he http://tinyurl.com/6aqxn

I have the Presto, and it works as advertised. It's worth the price,
especially compared to the Technivorm. Not a perfect product but
definitely a good value.

R. Foster
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Old 23-12-2004, 03:12 AM
Keith R.
 
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Bought mine from Costco last month. Received it a few days later.
Everything so far works well. I have no complaints. It feels less
plasticky than any other drip machine I've owned. It also looks good
next to a Solis Maestro.

My only complaint is the digital display is hard to read and looks like
it wasn't designed for it. The display is rectangular and the opening
is oval...

Keith R.
Warrenton, VA USA

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Old 27-12-2004, 12:15 PM
[email protected]
 
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Just before midnight on MOnday, December 20, 2004, I ordered the Presto
coffeemaker from costco.com. By the time they carged $35.99 for the
machine, a five-percent surcharge for my purchase as a CostCo non-member,
collected my state sales tax and charged for shipping and handling, my total
bill came to $48 and a few cents.

It arrived at my door about mid-afternoon of Thursday, December 23. I was
almost shocked. Even though it had placed the order past the advertised
deadline for having a gift orderd and shipped so that they shipper would
guarantee delivery by Christmas, a 3-day turnaround is good any time of
year, but especially during the heart of the Christmas shippng rush.

I received the machine's shipping box, with the shipping label pasted to one
side, and the shipping statement shrink-wrapped in a pouch and glued onto
the top of the box. The packing box was not packaged inside any additional
box. I was a bit nervous. Would the carafe be broken? Would something be
smashed? Would anything be missing. There was only a strip of tape across
the top and a short way down each side holding the box closed. No
slit-and-tab closures like you get on the boxes from Braun, or Krups, or a
few other sellers. Nothing rattled inordinately, so, maybe everything's
fine.

Among machines I have bought lately, this box felt considerably heavier than
some other ones I've seen, heavier than the much larger 12-cup Kitchen Aid
drip machine I bought a couple of years ago.

My initial reactions were mixed. The front with the tear-drop style tall,
narrow carafe with the tapered filter basket reminds me a bit of the profile
of the Braun FlavorSelect line of machines. The gack part of the machine is
flat-sided and squared off. The whole thing has a nice solid, sturdy feel
about it, good-quality plastic, nice fit and finish, polarized two-prong
plug. So far, so good.

You get a sheet with information about reordering the carafe if you break
it, $14.95 plus shipping and handling from the Eau Claire, Wisconsin
distributor, Presto Industries, Inc. Ouch! It's a sturdy carafe, though,
not something you're likely to break just by doing something stupid like
breathing on it the wrong way. Just don't drop it!

The assumption is that you'll place this machine on the counter facing you
broadside. Placed that way, the rounded part of the machine with the basket
and the carafe and the warmer plate is on the rright and the narrower,
squared-off part with the water tank opening, the tank fill-level marking
tube, and the display and timer controls are to the left.

This machine is tall and narrow. The water reservoir is covered by a thin
cover, which raises to reveal an opening that is about 3.5-inches square,
not even a full 100 cm. The carafe is just over 5 inches in diameter at the
bottom and about 3 inches at the top, and it is just about 7 inches tall.
The machine body behind the warmer plate is shaped to fit the curves of the
carafe. As with so many drip coffee makers, they don't want you using
anybody else's carafes, especially not one of those so-called "universal"
models like ones sold for use in machines that use the cupcake filter
design, like so many Mr. Coffee, Black and Decker, and Proctor Silex
machines. The handle is comfortable to hold, even if you have a large hand
and fat fingers, and the spout is designed so that you can easily pour out a
narrow stream of coffee without any dribbbling. I found it even easy to
fill a tall slender insulated sport bottle from the carafe without needing
to take extra care to aim precisely or pour very slowly to avoid getting a
pour stream wider than the opening at the top of the bottle.

YOu don't get any extras with this machine. There's no water filter, and no
place in the reservoir for one. YOu get no scoop, and no paper filters, not
even the stingy three or four you get nowadays with new models from Braun or
Krups.

Claimed capacity is ten cups. Think, small cups, five-ounce ones. A full
pot fills my 16-ounce insulated steel mug three times with a little bit more
to spare.

Now, to the filters. The Presto takes a Melitta-style No. 4 modified cone
paper filter, or permanent filter. NOt all No. 4 permanent filters are
created equally-sized. Some are wider at the top than others. Some are
narrower or longer at the bottom than others, and some are considerably
taller from the top to the bottom than others. Presto likes a smaller
permanent filter.

The permanent filter that comes with the Braun FlavorSelect line fits
nicely, but leaves no headroom for the drip-stopper to move up and down
propperly. The filter for the the Braun AroMaster line is too fat at the
top to fit the Presto's basket. Filters sold by Krups for their Cafe Aroma
and Pro Aroma lines are too tall and two fat for the Presto's filter basket.

The permanent filters that come with the Cuisinart Grind and Brew models,
and the ones that come with the Delonghi Elite series models fits perfectly.
The Swiss Gold no. 4 filter fits perfectly once you remove that snap-on
plastic ring from the top of the cone.

As advertised, the Presto brewed up a full ten-cup pot in about eight
minutes, maybe a few seconds more. I did not play with the timer controls,
but found out that you press the Auto/Start button once to put the machine
in Auto mode. Press it a second time to start brewing now. Press it a third
time to turn the whole thing off. There is a button for, "Program", and one
each for Hours, and Minutes. There are two status lights, all lined up
around the under side of the tiny square digital display which is nestled
behind the machine's oval window and display opening. The display and
controls are mounted about 1/3 of the way up along the front side of the
water tank, which seems to be fairly well protected from an accidental water
spill. If you leave the machine on after brewing, the warmer plate shuts
off automagically after two hours.

That extra heater element in the top of the Presto does make a difference.
I don't have any way to obtain even aproximate temperature readings, but
this unit ranks at the top of the range among brewers I've owned and/or used
when it comes to high brewing temperature. It may even be a couple degrees
hotter than my five-year-old Braun FlavorSelect KF-157 12-cup brewer that I
was using at the time the Presto came in here.

That KF-157 brews its 12-cup full colplement in about 9 minutes. Braun's
idea of a "cup" seems to be about 5-and-a-half ounces.

After the required vinegar/water brew followed by two straight water brews
in the Presto, which also confirmed that the machine actually works, and
does it more or less as advertised, and also providing me with my initial
measurements of tank and carafe capacity, and brewing time for a full pot, I
was now ready for the real test. Grind up some coffee beans, scare up a
permanent filter, and make some coffee.

I used the KF-157's filter. That filter is a bit taller, and smaller at the
bottom than your average permanent No. 4 filter. It restricted the movement
of the drip stopper in the basket, so that it partially blocked the drain
hole at the bottom of the basket. This allwed water to back up a bit into
the filter during brewing, but not enough to overflow the basket with the
beans and the grind selection I was using.

I had some Ethiopian Yrgacheffe beans that had been roasted to something
just shy of what many alt.coffee members seem to call a "Full City" roast.
These beans are also a little bit past their prime, but I'm not throwing out
good coffee. I'm not shooting for a God shot of espresso here, just a
nice-tasting single-origin auto drip pot of coffee that smells nice and
tastes very good. I used the same grind setting on the three-year-old Solis
Maestro grinder that I had found to be the best for that particular bean for
the KF-157 using the KF-157's permanent filter. That grind worked out
nicely for the Presto, also, so I did not need to fiddle with different
grind settings the way I usually need to do when first trying out any new
drip machine, even different models from the same manufacturer, and
sometimes even different samples of the same model machine.
From the KF-157 this particular batch of coffee comes out nicely estringent
and earthy. From the Presto, it came out with slightly less bite, and with
a slightly less earthy but slightly smoother profile, with just a hint more
of floral notes in the taste profile. With everything else being as equal
as possible, same coffee, same grind, same filter, same aproximate ratio of
coffee to water, the brand new Presto beats the five-year-old Braun KF-157
for quality of brewed output by a hair.

The Braun's slightly more complicated drip stop mechanism still works better
than that implementation on any other drip coffeemaker I've ever seen or
used. The wider reservoir opening, and the larger carafe with its wider
opening makes the Braun more convenient to use and easier to clean. I
prefer the separate dedicated buttons for manual start or auto start found
on the Braun FlavorSelect models with timer controls, such as the KF-180,
KF-185, KF-187, and KF-190 than the single start button on the Presto.
There is no way to say whether the Presto will match the Braun models for
durability. Judging from how well the machine is put together, and the
quality of the materials that are used, I expect it should be definitely
above average when it comes to long-term reliability and trouble-free
operation.

Right off the bat, there are several things I'd change about the Presto's
design. I would like to lose the timer and LCD display in favor of three
dedicated switches: one to turn it on and off, one to selct for a full or a
small batch, and one to turn the warmer plate on or off. I would like more
brewing capacity--12 cups would be good--16 would be great. I would make
the overall dimmensions larger so the reservoir opening would be wider.
And, I'd get rid of that silly keyhole type opening at the top of the back
wall of the water reservoir. I never could figure out why so many
manufacturers include that uh, feature?

I would make the filter basket larger so it could hold the larger No. 4
permanent filters, giving more space for more coffee, and to allow more
"blooming" of freshly roasted coffee in the basket during brewing. I might
even want to go up to a basket size that would hold a No. 6 size filter,
especially if they offered the machine in a 12- or 16-cup capacity model.

I think, so far, that this machine is definitely a keeper, and I'll actually
use it rather than set it back as a reserve model to be used with something
else breaks and I need coffee.

I definitely would rate this Presto above several other machines I have now,
or have had fairly recently, including Cuisinart, Bunn, Capresso, and
Kitchen Aid models.


Brent Reynolds, Atlanta, GA USA
Phone: 1-404-814-0768

"I used a hand phaser, and ZAP! Hot Coffee!" - Yeoman Rand, Star Trek.
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 04:54 AM
[email protected]
 
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wrote:
I saved some of the messages posted to these groups a few weeks ago

about
the new Presto coffeemaker, a Scandinavian design featuring three

separate
heating elements to guarantee the water would be near the high end of

the
ideal temperature range when it hits the ground coffee in the basket.

I
figured that at the $40 or so price range, it might be worth a try,

so I
decided to go online and order one.

On its own website:

http://www.presto-net.com/

they wanted $69.99 plus shipping and handling. Nope--We're not

buying it
there.

The next stop was the Wal-Mart website where it showed up at $39.99

plus
shipping and handling. Then, on the same page, there was a note that

the
item was out of stock, was unavailable, after having been available

for a
time at a "close-out" price of $27.95 or something like that. It was

also
claimed to be an "online exclusive", which seemed about right,

because I was
not able to find it in any Wal-Mart stores, and none o the sales

people had
the foggiest idea what it was, having never heard of it.

So, Presto is not available in Wally's World. Next stop, CostCo's

online
operation. They have it in stock, $35.99 for members. There is a
five-percent surcharge for buyers who are not CostCo members. Then,

they
collect your state's sales tax and add on a shipping and handling

charge.

This little shopping exercise happened just before midnight on

Monday,
December 20. Maybe I'll have the beast on my kitchen counter some

time next
week.

In the meantime, have any of you actually bought and received this

Presto
machine, and what do you think of it, like and dislike about it? Is

it
really a fairly decent drip machine, or just another flimsy

cheaply-made
piece of junk?

Brent Reynolds, Atlanta, GA USA
Phone: 1-404-814-0768

If you yelled for 8 years, 7 months and 6 days you would
have produced enough sound energy to heat one cup of coffee.


I received my Presto on Christmas Day. My brother had a Costco card,
and ordered it online for me. The Presto was sturdily packed in its own
box with no outer protective box as others have stated. The Presto is
tall, narrow and made of better quality plastics than most
coffeemakers. It has a small footprint for a 10 cup machine. I couldn't
wait to get drive down to Intelligentsia to pickup some freshly roasted
beans, so I grabbed some whole bean S$'s Cafe Verona and Melitta #4
white filters at the local store.

I ground up some beans on my Infinity using the first "fine" setting.
For "robust" coffee, Presto recommends 13 tablespoons of ground coffee
for their definition of 10 cups(4.5 oz. each). I used about 11. I
preheated my thermal carafe with near-boiling water, and used some of
it to rinse the paper filter in basket. The resulting brew was
definitely hotter than other drip coffee I've had. I immediately
transferred the coffee into my Nissan 1.5l carafe. My first couple of
sips proved to be a little bitter and/or strong for my liking. I heated
some water in my Ibis kettle to add to the brewed coffee, which
resulted in a very drinkable cup. I think I will either go with a finer
grind and slightly less ground coffee, or a coarser grind if I stay
with the amount I used in the first batch. Does anyone have any ideas
as to which way is better? Finer grind, less coffee? Coarser grind,
more coffee?

Negatives? Swing out filter basket means that you can't stir the grinds
while brewing. Carafe opening is small, meaning you need a bottle brush
to clean it. It also does not allow you to dry out the inside of the
carafe thoroughly. The Presto is definitely a keeper, and I will use it
as my everyday coffee maker. This machine has already been put on
clearance at Walmart, and I haven't seen it in any stores which leads
me to believe that this model will soon be extinct. I am thinking
proactively about buying a replacement carafe just in case. I don't
think Presto put any money into marketing this coffee maker whatsoever.
Get one while you can...

Neal



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Old 29-12-2004, 05:24 PM
[email protected]
 
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On 2004-12-28 said:
Newsgroups: alt.coffee,rec.food.drink.coffee
On 27 Dec 2004 20:54:18 -0800,
wrote:
wrote:
I saved some of the messages posted to these groups a few weeks

ago about
the new Presto coffeemaker,

----SNIP----

The Presto was sturdily packed
in its own box with no outer protective box as others have stated.
The Presto is tall, narrow and made of better quality plastics
than most coffeemakers.

----SNIP----

I think I will either go with a finer grind and slightly less
ground coffee, or a coarser grind if I stay with the amount I used
in the first batch. Does anyone have any ideas as to which way is
better? Finer grind, less coffee? Coarser grind, more coffee?

----SNIP----

I would favor the option of finer grind, less coffee if your first attempt
was too strong. Remember, these machines are advertised as "automatic" drip
brewers. With a propperly designed filter basket, the right grind, and a
good filter--paper or permanent--you don't have to stir the coffee while
it's brewing. In the Presto, I find that the basket is nearly full of water
and all the coffee is thoroughly saturated in less than two minutes into the
brewing cycle. The machine takes about 8 minutes to brew its claimed
ten-cup capacity. This means that you'll definitely have all the coffee in
contact with propperly heated water for at least four minutes, just like the
SCAA and other authorities have long said you need for a good propperly made
cup of drip brewed coffee.

Negatives? Swing out filter basket means that you can't stir the
grinds while brewing. Carafe opening is small, meaning you need a
bottle brush to clean it. It also does not allow you to dry out
the inside of the carafe thoroughly. The Presto is definitely a
keeper, and I will use it as my everyday coffee maker. This
machine has already been put on clearance at Walmart, and I
haven't seen it in any stores which leads me to believe that this
model will soon be extinct. I am thinking proactively about buying
a replacement carafe just in case. I don't think Presto put any
money into marketing this coffee maker whatsoever. Get one while

you can...
Neal


I definitely hope is does not go extinct. I'll have to use the phone number
given on the machine and on the carafe replacement order sheet to see if I
can talk to somebody in the company's design department about the machine.
It would be a shame if it went away after so short a production and sales
run.

Was wondering if you were able to check out the water dispensing
method over the grounds - single drip or showerhead design?
Also does it seem able to accept a gold filter?
kindest regards,
--
~C~


The Presto takes a Melitta style No. 4 modified cone filter, and you don't
get any supplied with the machine, at least not the one I ordered online
from costco.com.

As I mentioned in another post I made about this machine, you'll need one of
the smaller no. 4 permanent filters, like the ones that come with the
Cuisinart Grind 'N Brew machines, the Delonghi Elite 10-cup models, or the
Swiss Gold brand No. 4 filter with the top ring section removed.

Brent Reynolds, Atlanta, GA USA
Phone: 1-404-814-0768
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Old 29-12-2004, 05:44 PM
[email protected]
 
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One more answer to one of the questions about the APresto, regarding the
brew head, single spout or showerhead?

It looks like it would be a showerhead, nine nice spouts, one in the center,
and 8 more encircling the one in the center. Only three of those, in a
straight line across the center, have actual openings. Even so, I find that
all the coffee gets saturated very quickly, so one should not need to do any
stopping and stirring of the coffee in the basket during the brewing
process.
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Old 29-12-2004, 05:46 PM
[email protected]
 
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The Presto has a 3 hole showerhead, with the holes aligned in a
straight row. What's interesting is that there are 6 more plugged holes
that are just sitting there seemingly waiting to be opened up.
Saturation is very good as it is. I do not think I will try any mods
with mine. Any takers? Neal

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Old 29-12-2004, 09:45 PM
Cordovero
 
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The next stop was the Wal-Mart website where it showed up at $39.99 plus
shipping and handling. Then, on the same page, there was a note that the
item was out of stock, was unavailable, after having been available for a
time at a "close-out" price of $27.95 or something like that. It was also
claimed to be an "online exclusive", which seemed about right, because I
was
not able to find it in any Wal-Mart stores, and none o the sales people
had
the foggiest idea what it was, having never heard of it.


FWIW, they have a bunch at my local WalMart in Vegas. Saw them there last
night. Selling for $39.99.

One thing I noticed is that it's a bit deceiving to say it uses "3 heating
elements" because that implies, to me at least, that all 3 are involved in
heating the water. An examination of the side of the box shows that one of
these heating elements is the burner.

- C.


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Old 31-12-2004, 06:41 AM
D. Ross
 
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| It looks like it would be a showerhead, nine nice spouts, one in the center,
| and 8 more encircling the one in the center. Only three of those, in a
| straight line across the center, have actual openings.

Incredible.

- David R.
--
Less information than you ever thought possible:
http://www.demitasse.net


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Old 31-12-2004, 06:41 AM
D. Ross
 
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| It looks like it would be a showerhead, nine nice spouts, one in the center,
| and 8 more encircling the one in the center. Only three of those, in a
| straight line across the center, have actual openings.

Incredible.

- David R.
--
Less information than you ever thought possible:
http://www.demitasse.net
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Old 01-01-2005, 12:36 AM
[email protected]
 
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On 2004-12-29 said:
Newsgroups: alt.coffee,rec.food.drink.coffee
The next stop was the Wal-Mart website where it showed up at $39.99
----SNIP----

something like that. It was also claimed to be an "online
exclusive", which seemed about right, because I was
not able to find it in any Wal-Mart stores, and none o the sales
people had
the foggiest idea what it was, having never heard of it.
FWIW, they have a bunch at my local WalMart in Vegas. Saw them
there last night. Selling for $39.99.
One thing I noticed is that it's a bit deceiving to say it uses "3
heating elements" because that implies, to me at least, that all 3
are involved in heating the water. An examination of the side of
the box shows that one of these heating elements is the burner.

Well, of course, one of the three heating elements is the warmer plate, or
"burner" as you call it. Think about it, how many heating elements do you
really need to heat up a column of water in its 12-14 inches up and 4-7
inches over trip from the bottom of the water tank to the exit point just
above the filter basket? Most drip machine designs make do with just one,
and some do it quite well that way.

Hopefully, that offering on Wal-Mart's online site was just a test run.
Maybe it will sell well in Wal-Mart stores. Judging from everything else
that's out there, $40 or so is a good price for a machine with a clock and
programmable timer, most of which cost more like $50 or more in most places.

Another advantage to the design is the shape of the carafe, wider at the
bottom, narrower at the top. This does away with what some call the
"stratification effect" where supposedly stronger brew stays at the bottom
and the weaker stuff at the end of the brewing cycle is at the top,
requiring them to be manually stirred in order to be mixed. If you have to
interveen manually to get a good brew once you've added coffee and water and
pressed the do-it-to-it button, you don't have an automatic brewing
appliance. Yes, the design and shape of the carafe does make a difference
in the quality of of brewed output, even if only a small one, and it makes a
very big difference in how pleasant and easy the machine is to live with.
If that Presto had been made as a 12-cup capacity machine, it would be just
about right; the carafe could be wider at the bottom and at the top, thus
easier to clean and dry after use. Then it would be more like one of the
carafes that came with the Braun FlavorSelect line of machines, such as the
KF-157 or KF-180 or KF-187, of which the KF-180 is the only model Braun is
still currently making and selling in the US.

Brent Reynolds, Atlanta, GA USA
Phone: 1-404-814-0768
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Old 01-01-2005, 01:38 AM
[email protected]
 
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....or better yet, why more manufacturers don't embrace the even simpler
concept of insulating the tube that supplies the heated water from the
surrounding cold water ala the Clarity and Technivorm.

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