Coffee (rec.drink.coffee) Discussing coffee. This includes selection of brands, methods of making coffee, etc. Discussion about coffee in other forms (e.g. desserts) is acceptable.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-11-2004, 03:38 PM
MJM
 
Posts: n/a
Default Pod Machines in the US - Fad or Long-Lasting?

My wife has asked for one of these single cup machines for Christmas.
Currently when she wants just one cup she uses a Folgers coffee bag in
the microwave.

I've done some quick research on the net, and have some concerns and
questions:

1) While these machines are popular in Europe, who is to say that these
are not this year's gimmick, and will not last a year or two (ie, the
companies will stop making the pods)?

2) Folgers coffee bags are relatively inexpensive. It appears that
these machines are set up for European customs, where a single cup of
coffee is just 4 oz. So if you want a typical American cup of coffee,
you'll need 2 pods (50 cents a cup?). Doesn't this make the machines
overall cost prohibitive?

3) Is cleaning up a machine more extensive than just cleaning up the
single cup used in the microwave?

4) It appears the pods are proprietary to each machine and cannot be
shared. Thus the quality of a cup of coffee is going to be more
dependent not on the machine but by the beans used for the pods -
correct? So how can one sample the coffee choices first before settling
on a machine?

5) I've seen ads for a "universal" pod that allows you to fill it with
your own choice of grounds. Is it effective, and how much of a cleanup
mess is there?

Anything else I forgot to address?

--

To reply, take out the garbage.

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Old 25-11-2004, 08:22 PM
Eric Svendson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

IMHO, these "pod machines" are a fad soon to fade. Without a doubt
there are lots of ways to make a single cup of coffee but see this
link to perhaps learn a little more.

http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=e...%26start%3D100

Eric S.
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 25-11-2004, 08:22 PM
Eric Svendson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

IMHO, these "pod machines" are a fad soon to fade. Without a doubt
there are lots of ways to make a single cup of coffee but see this
link to perhaps learn a little more.

http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=e...%26start%3D100

Eric S.
  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-11-2004, 01:57 PM
tooly
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"MJM" wrote in message
eless.com...
My wife has asked for one of these single cup machines for Christmas.
Currently when she wants just one cup she uses a Folgers coffee bag in
the microwave.

I've done some quick research on the net, and have some concerns and
questions:

1) While these machines are popular in Europe, who is to say that these
are not this year's gimmick, and will not last a year or two (ie, the
companies will stop making the pods)?

2) Folgers coffee bags are relatively inexpensive. It appears that
these machines are set up for European customs, where a single cup of
coffee is just 4 oz. So if you want a typical American cup of coffee,
you'll need 2 pods (50 cents a cup?). Doesn't this make the machines
overall cost prohibitive?

3) Is cleaning up a machine more extensive than just cleaning up the
single cup used in the microwave?

4) It appears the pods are proprietary to each machine and cannot be
shared. Thus the quality of a cup of coffee is going to be more
dependent not on the machine but by the beans used for the pods -
correct? So how can one sample the coffee choices first before settling
on a machine?

5) I've seen ads for a "universal" pod that allows you to fill it with
your own choice of grounds. Is it effective, and how much of a cleanup
mess is there?

Anything else I forgot to address?

--

To reply, take out the garbage.


I purchased a Mr. Coffee home cafe unit several weeks ago; made some of the
worst coffee I've tasted, very bitter and 'burnt'. I figured it was just my
taste though. So, purchased another machine [not a home cafe pod machine]
and was going to just give the Mr. Coffee pod machine away. Friend at work
made a cup and spit it out...throwing his cup in the sink. He didn't want
the machine either...free. I got another friend to take it home to see if
his wife wanted it. He said he'd probably bring it back though [he too did
not like the coffee it produced]. Moral here is I can't seem to even 'give
it away'.

This does not bode well, IMO...at least for the Mr. Coffee rendention to
these pod machines.


  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-11-2004, 01:57 PM
tooly
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"MJM" wrote in message
eless.com...
My wife has asked for one of these single cup machines for Christmas.
Currently when she wants just one cup she uses a Folgers coffee bag in
the microwave.

I've done some quick research on the net, and have some concerns and
questions:

1) While these machines are popular in Europe, who is to say that these
are not this year's gimmick, and will not last a year or two (ie, the
companies will stop making the pods)?

2) Folgers coffee bags are relatively inexpensive. It appears that
these machines are set up for European customs, where a single cup of
coffee is just 4 oz. So if you want a typical American cup of coffee,
you'll need 2 pods (50 cents a cup?). Doesn't this make the machines
overall cost prohibitive?

3) Is cleaning up a machine more extensive than just cleaning up the
single cup used in the microwave?

4) It appears the pods are proprietary to each machine and cannot be
shared. Thus the quality of a cup of coffee is going to be more
dependent not on the machine but by the beans used for the pods -
correct? So how can one sample the coffee choices first before settling
on a machine?

5) I've seen ads for a "universal" pod that allows you to fill it with
your own choice of grounds. Is it effective, and how much of a cleanup
mess is there?

Anything else I forgot to address?

--

To reply, take out the garbage.


I purchased a Mr. Coffee home cafe unit several weeks ago; made some of the
worst coffee I've tasted, very bitter and 'burnt'. I figured it was just my
taste though. So, purchased another machine [not a home cafe pod machine]
and was going to just give the Mr. Coffee pod machine away. Friend at work
made a cup and spit it out...throwing his cup in the sink. He didn't want
the machine either...free. I got another friend to take it home to see if
his wife wanted it. He said he'd probably bring it back though [he too did
not like the coffee it produced]. Moral here is I can't seem to even 'give
it away'.

This does not bode well, IMO...at least for the Mr. Coffee rendention to
these pod machines.




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-11-2004, 11:55 PM
tooly
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Alan wrote in message
...
On 25 Nov 2004 12:22:59 -0800,
(Eric
Svendson) wrote:

IMHO, these "pod machines" are a fad soon to fade. Without a doubt
there are lots of ways to make a single cup of coffee but see this
link to perhaps learn a little more.

http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=e...%26start%3D100

Eric S.



Those of us who enjoy good "anything" are frequently willing
to pooh-pooh a new consumer product for people who don't
know what's good.

It may last.

Wouldn't surprise me.




That's true. I've made comments about my own 'ordeal', existing upon a
particular 'lower' socio-economic level, and feeling sort of 'herded' along
like cattle by the corporate overseers. I exist upon the discount
market...not full margin. That makes sense for someone with my income on
things like houses, cars, even many appliances...but something like coffee,
I feel a bit resentful that I seemed to be going in circles trying to create
a good cup at home and only finding what I feel now is near 'junk' on the
discount market.

Information is power, but only recently have I found all I really needed was
a $20 press pot to get a decent cup of coffee at home. In the meantime I
was dependent upon advertising and marketing for my information [since I did
not sorround myself with affluence]...which was not designed to lead me to
satisfication, but to 'sell me stuff'. Like a Home Cafe machine...looks so
'affluent' on the box; finally a really 'good' cup of coffee at home etc I
thought; ha, think again. I had the ability to pay, was willing to
pay...but I had to seek outside my 'social' range to find anything decent.
Of course, first I had to search out all the alternatives at the discount
level...which meant wasting a lot of bucks [I couldn't really afford].

So, you're quite right, I imagine there are many people like myself, short
on information, long on demand [for quality in some items, like coffee], but
peruse the discount level of retail marketing which only offers 'junk' [for
the most part]. It's like us 'animals' can drink from the water trough;
'they' don't know better anyway [so probably some boardroom marketer might
argue in their strategy outline]. Put a bag of oats on thier neck and call
it 'cuisine'...and they'll 'come'.

[guess you can tell I'm ****ed about all that wasted money floundering
around at WalMart]...
$20 for a press pot mind you...that's all I really needed. Some people
don't know what's good because the information is not provided for them [and
I believe, perhaps even withheld for sake of 'selling stuff' ].








  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-11-2004, 11:55 PM
tooly
 
Posts: n/a
Default


Alan wrote in message
...
On 25 Nov 2004 12:22:59 -0800,
(Eric
Svendson) wrote:

IMHO, these "pod machines" are a fad soon to fade. Without a doubt
there are lots of ways to make a single cup of coffee but see this
link to perhaps learn a little more.

http://groups.google.com/groups?hl=e...%26start%3D100

Eric S.



Those of us who enjoy good "anything" are frequently willing
to pooh-pooh a new consumer product for people who don't
know what's good.

It may last.

Wouldn't surprise me.




That's true. I've made comments about my own 'ordeal', existing upon a
particular 'lower' socio-economic level, and feeling sort of 'herded' along
like cattle by the corporate overseers. I exist upon the discount
market...not full margin. That makes sense for someone with my income on
things like houses, cars, even many appliances...but something like coffee,
I feel a bit resentful that I seemed to be going in circles trying to create
a good cup at home and only finding what I feel now is near 'junk' on the
discount market.

Information is power, but only recently have I found all I really needed was
a $20 press pot to get a decent cup of coffee at home. In the meantime I
was dependent upon advertising and marketing for my information [since I did
not sorround myself with affluence]...which was not designed to lead me to
satisfication, but to 'sell me stuff'. Like a Home Cafe machine...looks so
'affluent' on the box; finally a really 'good' cup of coffee at home etc I
thought; ha, think again. I had the ability to pay, was willing to
pay...but I had to seek outside my 'social' range to find anything decent.
Of course, first I had to search out all the alternatives at the discount
level...which meant wasting a lot of bucks [I couldn't really afford].

So, you're quite right, I imagine there are many people like myself, short
on information, long on demand [for quality in some items, like coffee], but
peruse the discount level of retail marketing which only offers 'junk' [for
the most part]. It's like us 'animals' can drink from the water trough;
'they' don't know better anyway [so probably some boardroom marketer might
argue in their strategy outline]. Put a bag of oats on thier neck and call
it 'cuisine'...and they'll 'come'.

[guess you can tell I'm ****ed about all that wasted money floundering
around at WalMart]...
$20 for a press pot mind you...that's all I really needed. Some people
don't know what's good because the information is not provided for them [and
I believe, perhaps even withheld for sake of 'selling stuff' ].








  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 02:35 AM
Alan [email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

of choice (turnips, carrots, potatoes, etc) cubed

Make a crust from scratch - or go shamefully to the frozen food section
of your favorite grocery and select 2 high quality pie crusts (you
will need one for the top also).
Boil the prepared delicacy until the meat starts to come off the bones.
Remove, de-bone and cube; continue to reduce the broth.
Brown the onions, peppers and celery.
Add the meat then season, continue browning.
De-glaze with sherry, add the reduced broth.
Finally, put in the root vegetables and simmer for 15 minutes.
Allow to cool slightly.
Place the pie pan in 375 degree oven for a few minutes so bottom crust is not soggy,
reduce oven to 325.
Fill the pie with stew, place top crust and with a fork, seal the crusts together
then poke holes in top.
Return to oven and bake for 30 minutes, or until pie crust is golden brown.



Sudden Infant Death Soup

SIDS: delicious in winter, comparable to old fashioned Beef and Vegetable Soup.
Its free, you can sell the crib, baby clothes, toys, stroller... and so easy to
procure if such a lucky find is at hand (just pick him up from the crib and
he?s good to go)!

SIDS victim, cleaned
cup cooking oil
Carrots
onions
broccoli
whole cabbage
f


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 03:55 AM
tooly
 
Posts: n/a
Default

etc
2 cups beef stock

Marinate meat (optional, not necessary with better cuts).
Season liberally and lace with garlic cloves by making incisions,
and placing whole cloves deep into the meat.
Grease a baking pan, and fill with a thick bed of onions,
celery, green onions, and parsley.
Place roast on top with fat side up.
Place uncovered in 500 oven for 20 minutes, reduce oven to 325.
Bake till medium rare (150) and let roast rest.
Pour stock over onions and drippings, carve the meat and
place the slices in the au jus.



Bisque l?Enfant

Honor the memory of Grandma with this dish by utilizing her good
silver soup tureen and her great grandchildren (crawfish, crab or
lobster will work just as well, however this dish is classically
made with crawfish).

Stuffed infant heads, stuffed crawfish heads, stuffed crab or lobster shells;
make patties if shell or head is not available
(such as with packaged crawfish, crab, or headless baby).
Flour
oil
onions
bell peppers
garlic salt, pepper, etc.
3 cups chicken stock
2 sticks butter
3 tablespoons oil

First stuff the heads, or make the patties (see index)
then fry or bake.
Set aside to drain on paper towels.
Make a roux with butter, oil and flour,
brown vegetables in the roux, then add chicken stock and
allow to simmer for 20 minutes.
Add the patties or stuffed heads, and some loose crawfish,
lobster, long piglet, or what have you.
Cook on low for 15 minutes, then allow it to set for at least
15 minutes more.
Serve over steame


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 04:19 AM
Alan [email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

yet succulent source of protein.

2 human baby rib racks
3 cups barbecue sauce or honey glaze (see index)
Salt
black pepper
white pepper
paprika

Remove the silverskin by loosening from the edges,
then stripping off.
Season generously, rubbing the mixture into the baby?s flesh.
Place 1 quart water in a baking pan, the meat on a wire rack.
Bake uncovered in 250 oven for 1 hours.
When browned, remove and glaze,
return to oven and bake 20 minutes more to form a glaze.
Cut ribs into individual pieces and serve with extra sauce.



Fresh Sausage

If it becomes necessary to hide the fact that you are eating
human babies, this is the perfect solution.
But if you are still paranoid, you can substitute pork butt.

5 lb. lean chuck roast
3 lb. prime baby butt
2 tablespoons each:
salt
black, white and cayenne peppers
celery salt
garlic powder
parsley flakes
brown sugar
1 teaspoon sage
2 onions
6 cloves garlic
bunch green onions, chopped

Cut the children?s butts and the beef roast into pieces
that will fit in the grinder.
Run the meat through using a 3/16 grinding plate.
Add garlic, onions and seasoning then mix well.
Add just enough water for a smooth consistency, then mix again.
Form the sausage mixture into patties or stuff into natural casings.



Stillborn Stew

By definition, this meat cannot be had altogether fresh,
but have the lifeless unfortunate available immediately after delivery,
or use high quality beef or pork roasts (it is cheaper and better to
cut up a whole roast than to buy stew meat).

1 stillbirth, de-boned and cubed
cup vegetable oil
2 large onions
bell pepper
celery
garlic
cup red wine
3 Irish potatoes
2 large carrots

This is a simple classic stew that makes natural gravy,
thus it does not have to be thickened.




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 04:20 AM
Alan [email protected]
 
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Default

1 cup bean sprouts
5 sprigs green onion, finely chopped
5 cloves minced garlic
4-6 ounces bamboo shoots
Sherry
chicken broth
oil for deep frying (1 gallon)
Salt
pepper
soy & teriyaki
minced ginger, etc.
1 tablespoon cornstarch dissolved in a little cold water
1 egg beaten

Make the stuffing:
Marinate the flesh in a mixture of soy and teriyaki sauces
then stir fry in hot oil for till brown - about 1 minute, remove.
Stir-fry the vegetables.
Put the meat back into the wok and adjust the seasoning.
De-glaze with sherry, cooking off the alcohol.
Add broth (optional) cook a few more minutes.
Add the cornstarch, cook a few minutes till thick,
then place the stuffing into a colander and cool;
2 hours
Wrap the rolls:
Place 3 tablespoons of stuffing in the wrap, roll tightly -
corner nearest you first, fold 2 side corners in,
wrap till remaining corner is left.
Brush with egg, seal, and allow to sit on the seal for
a few


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 04:55 AM
Alan [email protected]
 
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Default

may be substituted for this classic holiday feast.
Although time consuming, this dish seems to take longer than it actually does;
as the entire house is filled with such a heavenly aroma,
the waiting becomes almost unbearable.

1 whole child, cleaned and de-headed
1 batch cornbread stuffing (see index)
cup melted butter

Remove the giblets from the infant and set aside.
Stuff the cavity where the child?s genitals and anus were located
using cup per pound of meat.
Tie the arms flat to the body, then pull the skin flaps up to close the cavity.
Now tie the thighs up tight to hold it all together.
Place breast side up in a large metal roasting pan.
Bake in 325 oven covered for 2 hours.
Remove cover, stick a cooking thermometer deep into one of the
baby?s buttocks and cook uncovered till thermometer reads 190,
about another hour.



Pro-Choice Po-Boy

Soft-shelled crabs serve just as well in this classic southern delicacy.
The sandwich originated in New Orleans, where an abundance of abortion clinics
thrive and hot French bread is always available.

2 cleaned fetuses, head on
2 eggs
1 tablespoon yellow mustard
1 cup seasoned flour
oil enough for deep frying
1 loaf French bread
Lettuce
tomatoes
mayonnaise, etc.

Marinate the fetuses in the egg-mustard mixture.
Dredge thoroughly in flour.
Fry at 375 until crispy golden brown.
Remove and place on paper towels.



Holiday Youngster

One can easily adapt this recipe to


  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 04:55 AM
Alan [email protected]
 
Posts: n/a
Default

may be substituted for this classic holiday feast.
Although time consuming, this dish seems to take longer than it actually does;
as the entire house is filled with such a heavenly aroma,
the waiting becomes almost unbearable.

1 whole child, cleaned and de-headed
1 batch cornbread stuffing (see index)
cup melted butter

Remove the giblets from the infant and set aside.
Stuff the cavity where the child?s genitals and anus were located
using cup per pound of meat.
Tie the arms flat to the body, then pull the skin flaps up to close the cavity.
Now tie the thighs up tight to hold it all together.
Place breast side up in a large metal roasting pan.
Bake in 325 oven covered for 2 hours.
Remove cover, stick a cooking thermometer deep into one of the
baby?s buttocks and cook uncovered till thermometer reads 190,
about another hour.



Pro-Choice Po-Boy

Soft-shelled crabs serve just as well in this classic southern delicacy.
The sandwich originated in New Orleans, where an abundance of abortion clinics
thrive and hot French bread is always available.

2 cleaned fetuses, head on
2 eggs
1 tablespoon yellow mustard
1 cup seasoned flour
oil enough for deep frying
1 loaf French bread
Lettuce
tomatoes
mayonnaise, etc.

Marinate the fetuses in the egg-mustard mixture.
Dredge thoroughly in flour.
Fry at 375 until crispy golden brown.
Remove and place on paper towels.



Holiday Youngster

One can easily adapt this recipe to


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 05:08 AM
tooly
 
Posts: n/a
Default

oil enough for deep frying
1 loaf French bread
Lettuce
tomatoes
mayonnaise, etc.

Marinate the fetuses in the egg-mustard mixture.
Dredge thoroughly in flour.
Fry at 375 until crispy golden brown.
Remove and place on paper towels.



Holiday Youngster

One can easily adapt this recipe to ham, though as presented,
it violates no religious taboos against swine.

1 large toddler or small child, cleaned and de-headed
Kentucky Bourbon Sauce (see index)
1 large can pineapple slices
Whole cloves

Place him (or ham) or her in a large glass baking dish, buttocks up.
Tie with butcher string around and across so that he looks like
he?s crawling.
Glaze, then arrange pineapples and secure with cloves.
Bake uncovered in 350 oven till thermometer reaches 160.



Cajun Babies

Just like crabs or crawfish, babies are boiled alive!
You don?t need silverware, the hot spicy meat comes off in your hands.

6 live babies
1 lb. smoked sausage
4 lemons
whole garlic
2 lb. new potatoes
4 ears corn
1 box salt
crab boil

Bring 3 gallons of water to a boil.
Add sausage, salt, crab boil, lemons and garlic.
Drop potatoes in, boil for 4 minutes.
Corn is added next, boil an additional 11 minutes.
Put the live babies into the boiling water and cover.
Boil till meat comes off easily with a fork.



Oven-Baked Baby-Back Ribs

Beef ribs or pork ribs can be used in this recipe,
and that is exactly what your dinner guests will assume!
An excellent way to expose the uninitiated to this highly misunderstood
yet succulent source of protein.

2 human baby rib racks
3 cups barbecue sauce or honey


  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-12-2004, 05:43 AM
Eric Svendson
 
Posts: n/a
Default

becomes necessary to hide the fact that you are eating
human babies, this is the perfect solution.
But if you are still paranoid, you can substitute pork butt.

5 lb. lean chuck roast
3 lb. prime baby butt
2 tablespoons each:
salt
black, white and cayenne peppers
celery salt
garlic powder
parsley flakes
brown sugar
1 teaspoon sage
2 onions
6 cloves garlic
bunch green onions, chopped

Cut the children?s butts and the beef roast into pieces
that will fit in the grinder.
Run the meat through using a 3/16 grinding plate.
Add garlic, onions and seasoning then mix well.
Add just enough water for a smooth consistency, then mix again.
Form the sausage mixture into patties or stuff into natural casings.



Stillborn Stew

By definition, this meat cannot be had altogether fresh,
but have the lifeless unfortunate available immediately after delivery,
or use high quality beef or pork roasts (it is cheaper and better to
cut up a whole roast than to buy stew meat).

1 stillbirth, de-boned and cubed
cup vegetable oil
2 large onions
bell pepper
celery
garlic
cup red wine
3 Irish potatoes
2 large carrots

This is a simple classic stew that makes natural gravy,
thus it does not have to be thickened.
Brown the meat quickly in very hot oil, remove and set aside.
Brown the onions, celery, pepper and garlic.
De-glaze with wine, return meat to the pan and season we




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