Coffee (rec.drink.coffee) Discussing coffee. This includes selection of brands, methods of making coffee, etc. Discussion about coffee in other forms (e.g. desserts) is acceptable.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 11-01-2008, 10:03 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4
Default Nespresso - the ultimate coffee?

Wow, I just bought a Nespresso Magimix machine off eBay - no pods included
:-(

The pods took a while to arrive from the "Nespresso Club" - about 5 days
following the order. They're also pretty expensive at 23 or 24 pence a cup
(about 50 cents) plus a hefty delivery charge.

But, wow, I have never tasted coffee like this befo it is far superior to
even the best tasting café blends in terms of crema, quality of taste and
freshness. The irony for me is that I only drink decaf - I can't tell the
difference in terms of taste with Nespresso though and I've even managed to
fool (knowledgeable) visitors in to believing that they were having a full
caffeine hit (by just giving them the drink and not saying a word).

I don't understand why Nestlé is competing with itself by introducing the
Dolce Gusto brand. Nespresso is simply bloody incredible - the most
impressive thing gadget wise and taste wise I have encountered since...
ever. And I'm not even a coffee drinker.

I can't recommend Nespresso enough. Sure you can't be too creative with
blend design but with a quality like this do you really need to be creative?
Bloody impressive.

Gareth.


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-01-2008, 10:10 AM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 3
Default Nespresso - the ultimate coffee?

But the drawback of Nespresso is limited to the coffee offered by Nespresso
only.

"Gareth"
.. .
Wow, I just bought a Nespresso Magimix machine off eBay - no pods included
:-(

The pods took a while to arrive from the "Nespresso Club" - about 5 days
following the order. They're also pretty expensive at 23 or 24 pence a cup
(about 50 cents) plus a hefty delivery charge.

But, wow, I have never tasted coffee like this befo it is far superior
to even the best tasting café blends in terms of crema, quality of taste
and freshness. The irony for me is that I only drink decaf - I can't tell
the difference in terms of taste with Nespresso though and I've even
managed to fool (knowledgeable) visitors in to believing that they were
having a full caffeine hit (by just giving them the drink and not saying a
word).

I don't understand why Nestlé is competing with itself by introducing the
Dolce Gusto brand. Nespresso is simply bloody incredible - the most
impressive thing gadget wise and taste wise I have encountered since...
ever. And I'm not even a coffee drinker.

I can't recommend Nespresso enough. Sure you can't be too creative with
blend design but with a quality like this do you really need to be
creative? Bloody impressive.

Gareth.



  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-01-2008, 07:45 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4
Default Nespresso - the ultimate coffee?



"diputs" wrote in message ...
But the drawback of Nespresso is limited to the coffee offered by
Nespresso only.


That's the problem. And it isn't that cheap either.

But I don't think it's possible to produce a better cup of coffee in your
home. I see that some high class restaurants in the UK are selling Nespresso
produced coffee for in excess of $12 a cup:

http://www.independent.co.uk/living/...cle3027384.ece



  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-01-2008, 06:02 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 3
Default Nespresso - the ultimate coffee?

I would like to share this method with you.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84uwCVYWaF8

I'm using exactly the same model and do the same things. It works but takes
time to practice.

"Gareth"
.. .


"diputs" wrote in message ...
But the drawback of Nespresso is limited to the coffee offered by
Nespresso only.


That's the problem. And it isn't that cheap either.

But I don't think it's possible to produce a better cup of coffee in your
home. I see that some high class restaurants in the UK are selling
Nespresso produced coffee for in excess of $12 a cup:

http://www.independent.co.uk/living/...cle3027384.ece





  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 02-02-2008, 08:52 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4
Default Nespresso - the ultimate coffee?



"diputs" wrote in message ...
I would like to share this method with you.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84uwCVYWaF8

I'm using exactly the same model and do the same things. It works but
takes time to practice.


It gets some bad reviews but actually it is interesting.

One problem with Nespresso is that it uses aluminum capsules that cannot be
recycled (unless you live in Switzerland and can take the used capsules back
to a Nespresso "boutique"). This is really shit. So in theory reusing the
capsules is a brilliant idea.

I would have thought that one problem with the reusable capsule model is
that the coffee isn't packed at the correct pressure so the water jet can't
pierce the foil correctly. I'm surprised though that the cream is so good -
must be something to do with the pump pressure. Does it work well?

Nestlé patented the Nespresso capsule design so that there aren't any
generic equivalents (more environmentally friendly) available. Again, this
is really shit. Other pod models have generic equivalents but Nespresso
doesn't.

In the UK Nestlé is subsidising the sale of Nespresso machines with money
back offers. It's almost a mass market phenomenon in the UK. The
environmental/recycling problem is going to catch Nestlé soon and that,
surely, can only be good for people who own the machine (why the hell do the
capsules need to be made from expensive and wasteful aluminum?)

But I'm not sure about the method you describe although it is interesting. I
don't know why the guy in the video is using his finger to put pressure on
the nozzle of the machine. I wouldn't be surprised if it could screw up the
machine.




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 04-02-2008, 08:05 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 3
Default Nespresso - the ultimate coffee?

Some bad reviews out there but this method really works.

From my expreience, the aluminum capsule can be recycled once only. Because
three holes which inject water from back will getting bigger and much more
water will leak out from the leakage which will affect the pressure inside
the capsule (that's why some people observe from the video that the coffee
comes out so slow and less than the original capsule). So the most important
skill is make sure the water can be injected from the previous holes, and
the other thing is you cannot press the powder into the capsule too hard
when using the finest grain coffee powder.

BTW, his finger put pressure on the nozzle of the machine is meaningless.

"Gareth"
.. .


"diputs" wrote in message ...
I would like to share this method with you.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=84uwCVYWaF8

I'm using exactly the same model and do the same things. It works but
takes time to practice.


It gets some bad reviews but actually it is interesting.

One problem with Nespresso is that it uses aluminum capsules that cannot
be recycled (unless you live in Switzerland and can take the used capsules
back to a Nespresso "boutique"). This is really shit. So in theory reusing
the capsules is a brilliant idea.

I would have thought that one problem with the reusable capsule model is
that the coffee isn't packed at the correct pressure so the water jet
can't pierce the foil correctly. I'm surprised though that the cream is so
good - must be something to do with the pump pressure. Does it work well?

Nestlé patented the Nespresso capsule design so that there aren't any
generic equivalents (more environmentally friendly) available. Again, this
is really shit. Other pod models have generic equivalents but Nespresso
doesn't.

In the UK Nestlé is subsidising the sale of Nespresso machines with money
back offers. It's almost a mass market phenomenon in the UK. The
environmental/recycling problem is going to catch Nestlé soon and that,
surely, can only be good for people who own the machine (why the hell do
the capsules need to be made from expensive and wasteful aluminum?)

But I'm not sure about the method you describe although it is interesting.
I don't know why the guy in the video is using his finger to put pressure
on the nozzle of the machine. I wouldn't be surprised if it could screw up
the machine.




  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-02-2008, 06:39 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 4
Default Nespresso - the ultimate coffee?



"diputs" wrote in message ...
Some bad reviews out there but this method really works.

From my expreience, the aluminum capsule can be recycled once only.
Because three holes which inject water from back will getting bigger and
much more water will leak out from the leakage which will affect the
pressure inside the capsule (that's why some people observe from the video
that the coffee comes out so slow and less than the original capsule). So
the most important skill is make sure the water can be injected from the
previous holes, and the other thing is you cannot press the powder into
the capsule too hard when using the finest grain coffee powder.

BTW, his finger put pressure on the nozzle of the machine is meaningless.


I don't know if I'll give it a go although it does look as if it gives
pretty good results.

It's a shame that it isn't possible to buy Nespresso compatible capsules
made by other companies. Nespresso patented the Nespresso capsule design to
prevent this although they haven't done the same with Dolce Gusto.

Gareth.

  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-09-2009, 08:56 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1
Lightbulb

The capsule+coffee itself is patented, but I guess they can not patend the container itself (meaning the empty aluminium capsule).
It would be a great idea for an industrial to create and sell empty capsules with separate clipable covers to, let's say, store small portions of tea or coffee
  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 16-01-2011, 12:23 PM
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 1
Default

[quote=diputs;1072744]Some bad reviews out there but this method really works.

From my expreience, the aluminum capsule can be recycled once only.



Actually - the pods can be recycled indefinitely. They just recycle the aluminium which is one of the easiest products on earth to recycle (next to glass).

Also, if you live in the UK, you can bring your pods back to any store that sells Nespresso pods (like Selfridges in London) and they will do the recycling for you!


Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
RSS Coffee Feed - Gourmet Coffee Is The World's Finest Beverage! :: How Do Coffee Beans Become Coffee? :: Quick Tips for Better Coffee :: How Juicing Can Affect Your Life - Explore The Fruit Juicer :: A Delicious and Healthy Coffee Alternative - Trie `RSS,,,@...' Coffee 2 03-02-2012 02:23 PM
Caffè del Doge Brings the Ultimate Coffee Experience to Palo Alto Claudia Cornejo Marketplace 0 22-11-2005 08:32 AM
Caffè del Doge Brings the Ultimate Coffee Experience to Palo Alto Claudia Cornejo Coffee 0 22-11-2005 08:25 AM
Caffè del Doge Brings the Ultimate Coffee Experience to Palo Alto Claudia Cornejo Wine 0 22-11-2005 08:24 AM
Jura S95 Bean to Cup coffee machine-The Ultimate for Home or Small Business/Office kiff Marketplace 0 04-03-2004 01:29 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 02:19 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2019 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017