Coffee (rec.drink.coffee) Discussing coffee. This includes selection of brands, methods of making coffee, etc. Discussion about coffee in other forms (e.g. desserts) is acceptable.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2007, 02:31 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2
Default Water temperature question

On Jun 25, 3:28 pm, "Rostyslaw J. Lewyckyj"
wrote:
Here in the USA, due to occupational health and safety concerns,
almost all the cafe establishments operate with the restriction
of NO BOILING WATER!. As a consequence they are unable to brew
a decent pot of black tea!.
Now most of these places have espresso machines with milk steaming
attachments. So here's my question.
What is the temperature of the fluid (air/steam) which comes out
of the steaming heads? Is it above the boiling point of water?
and so, IF I ASKED NICELY, could be used by the barrista to heat
the water in the teapot to boiling, and so fit to brew a decent
pot of tea.
Asking them to nuke a pot doesn't work because:
- the pots usually have at least some metal fittings
- water in a mug often super heats, and explodes when
the cup is first disturbed.
--
Rostyk


I don't see why not. I routinely do this when I need a quick cup or
so of boiling water for tea, or any cooking need. Hot water from my
marzocco's hot water tap comes out at near boiling temp as well.

I also should note that I don't know squat about tea. I recently
learned from some tea folk that boiling water is not the right call
for brewing some teas. Maybe you know something about that?

-Greg


  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2007, 02:52 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 997
Default Water temperature question

Barutan Seijin writes:

Am 26 Jun 2007, Rostyslaw J. Lewyckyj schrieb:


Thanks. I was hoping that it would be comparable, i.e. no more
dangerous than frothing milk. i.e. Fill the Bodum with the _hot_ water
provided for making tea, steam that to a boil, and then put in the
brewing cup with its tea and plunger. Well it looks like I'll have to
stick to green teas at the cafe in the local Barnes and Noble or
Borders book stores.


Considering the quality of the tea you would get, this is no great
loss. Of course, the green tea is never very good, either.


Not to mention the fact that the taste of a paper cup is stronger than
that of almost any green tea...

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2007, 07:03 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 6
Default Water temperature question

Rostyslaw J. Lewyckyj wrote:

Here in the USA, due to occupational health and safety concerns,
almost all the cafe establishments operate with the restriction
of NO BOILING WATER!.


Never heard that one! That's was I call al dente pasta!

I know that some people use charcoal filters on their shower head,
something about volatile chemicals in the water. But I've NEVER heard
of restrictions in restaurants.

As a consequence they are unable to brew
a decent pot of black tea!.


I'm reading this from alt.coffee. When I drink tea, it's usually a
green tea, and I've been told it's best NOT to use boiling water, but
something at around 185 degrees or so (if my memory serves me). Is
black tea different?

Since I'm on tea, I recently saw the blooming display teas on TV. They
are hand stitched in china, and come in a ball shape. When the hot
water hits them, they open up, and there are a couple of flower blossoms
inside. It's a cool and unusual novelty, and the one that I tried so
far actually was very good. A mild green tea with a decided floral
note. There are a couple of suppliers that will send a "free sample" or
two, for a couple bucks postage. I plan to order more. I think it
would make an unusual gift, along with a clear tea pot.

EXAMPLE:
http://scribalterror.blogs.com/scrib...splay_teas.jpg

Now most of these places have espresso machines with milk steaming
attachments. So here's my question.
What is the temperature of the fluid (air/steam) which comes out
of the steaming heads? Is it above the boiling point of water?
and so, IF I ASKED NICELY, could be used by the barrista to heat
the water in the teapot to boiling, and so fit to brew a decent
pot of tea.
Asking them to nuke a pot doesn't work because:
- the pots usually have at least some metal fittings
- water in a mug often super heats, and explodes when
the cup is first disturbed.

  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2007, 07:27 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 997
Default Water temperature question

Jim writes:

[...]
I'm reading this from alt.coffee. When I drink tea, it's usually a
green tea, and I've been told it's best NOT to use boiling water, but
something at around 185 degrees or so (if my memory serves me).


Actually, I like most greens brewed cooler than that, some as cool as
140F.

Is black tea different?


Yes. Most people like fully-oxidized teas brewed with water at a full
boil.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2007, 07:29 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 15
Default Water temperature question

Barutan Seijin wrote:
Am 26 Jun 2007, Rostyslaw J. Lewyckyj schrieb:


Thanks. I was hoping that it would be comparable, i.e. no more
dangerous than frothing milk. i.e. Fill the Bodum with the _hot_ water
provided for making tea, steam that to a boil, and then put in the
brewing cup with its tea and plunger. Well it looks like I'll have to
stick to green teas at the cafe in the local Barnes and Noble or
Borders book stores.


Considering the quality of the tea you would get, this is no great
loss. Of course, the green tea is never very good, either.


Agreed. But I go to the bookstores primarily to browse and read
the books, and not for the tea or coffee. Although the tea and
coffee there is better than in the standard (not specialty)
restaurants. At least one can order a pot of "green tips" or
"english breakfast" and not be served a bag of: Salada, Liptons,
or some restaurant suppliers tea. Also the coffee is generally
better, and so is the choice of pastries.
Which is all meant as faint praise.
--
Rostyk


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2007, 08:00 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 567
Default Water temperature question

On 27 Jun 2007 14:27:03 -0400, Lewis Perin wrote:

Jim writes:

[...]
I'm reading this from alt.coffee. When I drink tea, it's usually a
green tea, and I've been told it's best NOT to use boiling water, but
something at around 185 degrees or so (if my memory serves me).


Actually, I like most greens brewed cooler than that, some as cool as
140F.



Can you describe how it tastes different when you use cooler water?

--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 27-06-2007, 08:30 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 997
Default Water temperature question

Ken Blake writes:

On 27 Jun 2007 14:27:03 -0400, Lewis Perin wrote:

Jim writes:

[...]
I'm reading this from alt.coffee. When I drink tea, it's usually a
green tea, and I've been told it's best NOT to use boiling water, but
something at around 185 degrees or so (if my memory serves me).


Actually, I like most greens brewed cooler than that, some as cool as
140F.



Can you describe how it tastes different when you use cooler water?


Sweeter, less astringent, and if it's really good tea, there could be
lots of nuances: fruity, floral, nutty.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2007, 02:07 AM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 567
Default Water temperature question

On 27 Jun 2007 15:30:17 -0400, Lewis Perin wrote:

Ken Blake writes:

On 27 Jun 2007 14:27:03 -0400, Lewis Perin wrote:

Jim writes:

[...]
I'm reading this from alt.coffee. When I drink tea, it's usually a
green tea, and I've been told it's best NOT to use boiling water, but
something at around 185 degrees or so (if my memory serves me).

Actually, I like most greens brewed cooler than that, some as cool as
140F.



Can you describe how it tastes different when you use cooler water?


Sweeter, less astringent, and if it's really good tea, there could be
lots of nuances: fruity, floral, nutty.



Thank you. I'll have to try it that way.

--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup
  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2007, 02:23 AM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 6
Default Water temperature question

Lewis Perin wrote:

Jim writes:


[...]
I'm reading this from alt.coffee. When I drink tea, it's usually a
green tea, and I've been told it's best NOT to use boiling water, but
something at around 185 degrees or so (if my memory serves me).



Actually, I like most greens brewed cooler than that, some as cool as
140F.


I thought 185 might be on the high side, but I know I used hotter than
140. I'll have to try some both ways. I still have a couple of the
"flower ball" things I need to try out.



Is black tea different?



Yes. Most people like fully-oxidized teas brewed with water at a full
boil.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html

  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2007, 03:19 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 997
Default Water temperature question

Jim writes:

Lewis Perin wrote:

Jim writes:

[...]
I'm reading this from alt.coffee. When I drink tea, it's usually a
green tea, and I've been told it's best NOT to use boiling water, but
something at around 185 degrees or so (if my memory serves me).

Actually, I like most greens brewed cooler than that, some as cool as
140F.


I thought 185 might be on the high side, but I know I used hotter than
140. I'll have to try some both ways. I still have a couple of the
"flower ball" things I need to try out.


Not to discourage you from using a cooler temperature, but those
display teas probably need it less than most greens simply because
display teas tend to be made from big, mature leaves. You'd get
dramatic results from cool brewing with green teas manufactured from
tiny, early spring buds and leaves.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2007, 04:45 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 4
Default Water temperature question

Am 27 Jun 2007, Lewis Perin schrieb:



Not to mention the fact that the taste of a paper cup is stronger than
that of almost any green tea...


That's true of the stale green tea in a bag you're likely to get in a
café in the US.

I'm guessing you've never had matcha. That'll knock your socks off.


--

  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2007, 06:42 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 642
Default Water temperature question

Rostyslaw J. Lewyckyj wrote:

Even in restaurants getting tea brewed with boiling water is almost
impossible around here. , and they usually have only the dinky
one cup capacity pots and no choice in teas.


The two places I have been in the US which offer properly-made tea are
the Blue Talon in Williamsburg VA (which has a very limited selection
but decent quality and proper brewing) and Legal Seafood (which started
in Boston but is now all over and which has a wider selection).
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra. C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 28-06-2007, 07:00 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 997
Default Water temperature question

Barutan Seijin writes:

Am 27 Jun 2007, Lewis Perin schrieb:



Not to mention the fact that the taste of a paper cup is stronger than
that of almost any green tea...


That's true of the stale green tea in a bag you're likely to get in a
café in the US.


It's also true of subtle green teas that are completely fresh.

I'm guessing you've never had matcha. That'll knock your socks off.


I'd forgotten matcha. You're right; its taste should dominate a paper
cup's.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-06-2007, 05:36 AM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 6
Default Water temperature question

Lewis Perin wrote:
Jim writes:


Lewis Perin wrote:


Jim writes:


[...]
I'm reading this from alt.coffee. When I drink tea, it's usually a
green tea, and I've been told it's best NOT to use boiling water, but
something at around 185 degrees or so (if my memory serves me).

Actually, I like most greens brewed cooler than that, some as cool as
140F.


I thought 185 might be on the high side, but I know I used hotter than
140. I'll have to try some both ways. I still have a couple of the
"flower ball" things I need to try out.



Not to discourage you from using a cooler temperature, but those
display teas probably need it less than most greens simply because
display teas tend to be made from big, mature leaves. You'd get
dramatic results from cool brewing with green teas manufactured from
tiny, early spring buds and leaves.


Thanks. I really know very little about tea. I generally go to a place
in Seattle's International District, and buy loose green tea in a mid or
upper mid price range, and hope for the best. The display teas are a
novelty that I had to check out. If you have a suggestion for what to
look for when I buy green tea, I'd welcome it.
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 29-06-2007, 02:39 PM posted to rec.food.drink.coffee,alt.coffee,alt.tea,rec.food.drink.tea
external usenet poster
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 1,231
Default Water temperature question

The ones I have which is a good cross section are made from bud
(round). They're actually nipped when they open up. These are
essentially green tea bud concentrate. I drink mine off the top in a
thermal glass cup with 50% displacement. It reminds you of a liquor.
They remind me of coral fauna. Delicate not course. I've never
finished one off because my tastebuds gave out first. I will be the
first to suggest the perfect complement for the never ending gongfu
session. It's better if you judge one by the total of
sight,smell,taste. They don't look appetizing when they dry out. I
use boiling water for mine. It doesn't seem to hurt the interior. It
cools down much faster than corresponding loose leaf.

Jim

PS I've mentioned Fairy Peach blossom which is common in my stores as
one of my favorite green teas from China. There is no flower, no
scent. They look like fuzzy strips on the surface from the wrapped
bud. I have several called Fairy which has the hairy look. I think
you can key on the word Fairy when looking under your pillow.

Lewis Perin wrote:
Jim writes:

Lewis Perin wrote:

Jim writes:

[...]
I'm reading this from alt.coffee. When I drink tea, it's usually a
green tea, and I've been told it's best NOT to use boiling water, but
something at around 185 degrees or so (if my memory serves me).
Actually, I like most greens brewed cooler than that, some as cool as
140F.


I thought 185 might be on the high side, but I know I used hotter than
140. I'll have to try some both ways. I still have a couple of the
"flower ball" things I need to try out.


Not to discourage you from using a cooler temperature, but those
display teas probably need it less than most greens simply because
display teas tend to be made from big, mature leaves. You'd get
dramatic results from cool brewing with green teas manufactured from
tiny, early spring buds and leaves.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin /
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html




Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules

Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Brewing Tea - Water, Temperature, and Time Dominic T. Tea 8 29-11-2011 09:23 AM
Water temperature question Rostyslaw J. Lewyckyj Tea 36 21-11-2008 10:28 AM
Matcha water temperature? Evojeesus Tea 8 07-06-2007 08:53 PM
water temperature [email protected] Tea 14 02-11-2005 03:56 AM
water temperature and green tea Sara Hawk Tea 15 29-11-2003 09:52 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 03:15 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2022 FoodBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.
 

About Us

"It's about Food and drink"

 

Copyright © 2017