Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 27-04-2005, 07:25 PM
Hunibal
 
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Default I thought, Salt - is - Salt! What is the difference?

I need help,
I Keep reading about different kind of salts:
Table salt
Sea Salt
Kosher Salt
I thought, Salt - is - Salt! What is the difference?

--


Cheers _ Hunibal _



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Old 27-04-2005, 08:10 PM
 
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On 2005-04-27, Hunibal wrote:
I need help,
I Keep reading about different kind of salts:
Table salt
Sea Salt
Kosher Salt
I thought, Salt - is - Salt! What is the difference?


Well, there are some differences in flavors and crystal size.

Unless I need a fine grind, I've started using kosher salt for almost
everything (particularly rubs, etc). I think the flavor is slightly
superior (doesn't taste, I don't know... as "iodized", maybe), but the
real advantage is the crystal size.

With larger crystals, you get more defined "bites" of flavor (sort of
like the difference between fine-ground and coarse-ground pepper), and
a more granular texture. Since the crystals have more surface area, a
"pinch of salt" is a bit bigger and more manageable with kosher salt
(you can pick up a nice big pinch and drizzle it in a nice
distribution). Subjectively, the larger flakes seem to "grab" meat a
little more definitively when used in a rub.

If you are applying salt to the external part of a dish (like salting
bread or pretzels, or a salt rind on meat), the extra size of the
kosher flakes makes for not only a nicer visual presentation but also
a nice bit of crunchy texture.

(as an aside, the large crystals of kosher salt give it another great
use in the kitchen--when you're done with cooking in your cast-iron
skillet and have just bits of grime left, drop in a half-handful of
kosher salt and scrub the heck out of it with a paper towel; the edges
of the crystals act like a great abrasive, and you can clean the pan
pretty darn well without ever immersing it or getting soap near it.
Mind you don't burn yourself if you try this with bare hands and a hot
skillet, though--and of course wipe out all the salt after it's done
its cleaning duties; leaving salt in an iron skillet wouldn't be too
wise if moisture got involved).

So for me, kosher salt is a major improvement over table salt. I
don't really see the need/niche for sea salt yet; I imagine it's taste
(and there are even "gourmet salts" like the French "fleur de sel",
which I just don't understand at all).


--VPutz
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Old 27-04-2005, 09:31 PM
Brick
 
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On 27-Apr-2005, "Hunibal" wrote:

need help,
I Keep reading about different kind of salts:
Table salt
Sea Salt
Kosher Salt
I thought, Salt - is - Salt! What is the difference?


Cheers _ Hunibal _


Try this url Hunibal. It describes most of the known types of
salt in detail. If the url doesn't work, go to Epicurious.com and
select their food dictionary. (tinyurl's don't always work.
Look up salt. This link is a shortcut to that article.

http://tinyurl.com/7fxec

Brick (Keep the shiny side up)

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Old 28-04-2005, 02:48 AM
Edwin Pawlowski
 
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"Brick" wrote in message

Try this url Hunibal. It describes most of the known types of
salt in detail. If the url doesn't work, go to Epicurious.com and
select their food dictionary. (tinyurl's don't always work.
Look up salt. This link is a shortcut to that article.

http://tinyurl.com/7fxec



Good information, but I do take issue with something.

They say kosher salt has no additives. Diamond has none, but Morton's does
have anti-caking additives. They blandly say that Kosher slat is used by
some Jews for preparing meat. Well? ? ? ? ? How about what preparation?
All salt can be kosher. A certain type of salt though, is used for
koshering meats. The flake of kosher salt, rather than grain of table salt,
makes it better for drawing the blood from the meat in the koshering
process.

Sea salt us usually rather pure, but there are some expensive sea salts that
contain minerals and give a different taste. I have no first hand
experience with them though.




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Old 28-04-2005, 12:54 PM
Larry Noah
 
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Default

On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 01:48:49 GMT, "Edwin Pawlowski"
wrote:


"Brick" wrote in message

Try this url Hunibal. It describes most of the known types of
salt in detail. If the url doesn't work, go to Epicurious.com and
select their food dictionary. (tinyurl's don't always work.
Look up salt. This link is a shortcut to that article.

http://tinyurl.com/7fxec



Good information, but I do take issue with something.

They say kosher salt has no additives. Diamond has none, but Morton's does
have anti-caking additives. They blandly say that Kosher slat is used by
some Jews for preparing meat. Well? ? ? ? ? How about what preparation?
All salt can be kosher. A certain type of salt though, is used for
koshering meats. The flake of kosher salt, rather than grain of table salt,
makes it better for drawing the blood from the meat in the koshering
process.


Morton's is also a little finer. A tablespoon of Morton's does not
equal a tablespoon of Diamond.






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Old 28-04-2005, 02:54 PM
Cam
 
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Hunibal wrote:
I need help,
I Keep reading about different kind of salts:
Table salt
Sea Salt
Kosher Salt
I thought, Salt - is - Salt! What is the difference?


You can see for yourself if you own a scale. Compare the weight of a
cup of table salt to a cup of Kosher. The table salt will be heavier
because the finer crystals are packed tighter in the cup.

Or you could taste them...

Cam

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Old 28-04-2005, 04:27 PM
Hunibal
 
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Default

Thanx for everyone's help.

--


Cheers _ Hunibal _
"Brick" wrote in message
...

On 27-Apr-2005, "Hunibal" wrote:

need help,
I Keep reading about different kind of salts:
Table salt
Sea Salt
Kosher Salt
I thought, Salt - is - Salt! What is the difference?


Cheers _ Hunibal _


Try this url Hunibal. It describes most of the known types of
salt in detail. If the url doesn't work, go to Epicurious.com and
select their food dictionary. (tinyurl's don't always work.
Look up salt. This link is a shortcut to that article.

http://tinyurl.com/7fxec

Brick (Keep the shiny side up)

----== Posted via Newsfeeds.Com - Unlimited-Uncensored-Secure Usenet
News==----
http://www.newsfeeds.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! 120,000+
Newsgroups
----= East and West-Coast Server Farms - Total Privacy via Encryption
=----





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