Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 05-04-2005, 10:19 PM
Rob
 
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Default Keeping the coal hot

Hi all,

I just got a Brinkman Smoker and am having problems keeping the charcoal
hot. What is the secret to keeping the coals hot and do you mix your wood
with your coals?

Thanks
Rob



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Old 05-04-2005, 10:45 PM
TFM®
 
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Rob wrote:
Hi all,

I just got a Brinkman Smoker and am having problems keeping the
charcoal hot. What is the secret to keeping the coals hot and do you
mix your wood with your coals?




Holes in the coal pan worked best for me. I drilled a dozen or so half inch
holes all over the bottom.

The best advice though is to get a WSM. It's what a Brinkmann wants to be.

I got mine as a wedding gift. I know they're considerably more expensive
than the Brinkmann, but if my current one ever wears out, I won't hesitate
a second in buying a replacement. They're *that* good.

In a pinch, you could hang the coal pan in a tree and take a shot from about
20 yards with 12 guage 00 buckshot. G


TFM®


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Old 05-04-2005, 10:45 PM
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Rob wrote:
Hi all,

I just got a Brinkman Smoker and am having problems keeping the
charcoal hot. What is the secret to keeping the coals hot and do you
mix your wood with your coals?




Holes in the coal pan worked best for me. I drilled a dozen or so half inch
holes all over the bottom.

The best advice though is to get a WSM. It's what a Brinkmann wants to be.

I got mine as a wedding gift. I know they're considerably more expensive
than the Brinkmann, but if my current one ever wears out, I won't hesitate
a second in buying a replacement. They're *that* good.

In a pinch, you could hang the coal pan in a tree and take a shot from about
20 yards with 12 guage 00 buckshot. G


TFM®


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Old 05-04-2005, 11:34 PM
BOB
 
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TFM® wrote:
Rob wrote:
Hi all,

I just got a Brinkman Smoker and am having problems keeping the
charcoal hot. What is the secret to keeping the coals hot and do
you
mix your wood with your coals?




Holes in the coal pan worked best for me. I drilled a dozen or so
half inch holes all over the bottom.


I'm disappointed...all this time, I thought you used a shotgun.


The best advice though is to get a WSM. It's what a Brinkmann wants
to be.


Best under $200 ever spent on a smoker/grill.


I got mine as a wedding gift. I know they're considerably more
expensive than the Brinkmann, but if my current one ever wears out,
I won't hesitate a second in buying a replacement. They're *that*
good.


If I ever lose my ceramic trio, a WSM will be here in a heartbeat.


In a pinch, you could hang the coal pan in a tree and take a shot
from about 20 yards with 12 guage 00 buckshot. G


My faith has been restored!



TFM®


BOB


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Old 06-04-2005, 02:52 PM
Cam
 
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Default


Rob wrote:
Hi all,

I just got a Brinkman Smoker and am having problems keeping the

charcoal
hot. What is the secret to keeping the coals hot and do you mix your

wood
with your coals?

Thanks
Rob


Does the charcoal sit on the bottom of the pan or did they give you a
fire grate? Once you've shot some holes in the pan you'll want to
elevate the coals an inch or two above the bottom. If you don't have a
fire grate buy a smal baking rack and bash it into shape. You need
better airflow. Most mods for the Brinkman are to make it into a cheapo
fake WSM. Check out the FAQ for some more ideas
http://www.eaglequest.com/~bbq/faq2/7.html#7.2.1

Cam



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Old 06-04-2005, 05:12 PM
Dave
 
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Default


"Rob" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi all,

I just got a Brinkman Smoker and am having problems keeping the charcoal
hot. What is the secret to keeping the coals hot and do you mix your wood
with your coals?

Thanks
Rob


I addittion to the hole-fix, you might try using lump charcaol.
DT



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Old 06-04-2005, 05:12 PM
Dave
 
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Default


"Rob" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi all,

I just got a Brinkman Smoker and am having problems keeping the charcoal
hot. What is the secret to keeping the coals hot and do you mix your wood
with your coals?

Thanks
Rob


I addittion to the hole-fix, you might try using lump charcaol.
DT



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Old 07-04-2005, 02:31 PM
Christine Allison
 
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Default

You may not be using enough charcoal. The best practice is to burn at least
a chimney full and control the speed of burning with your cookers vents.

In general it's preferable to keep the exhaust vent open and control the
rate of combustion by adjusting the intake vent(s). If your stove parts are
not tight fitting and you have leaks this may be difficult.

Richard Smith

"Dave" wrote in message
nk.net...

"Rob" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi all,

I just got a Brinkman Smoker and am having problems keeping the

charcoal
hot. What is the secret to keeping the coals hot and do you mix your

wood
with your coals?

Thanks
Rob


I addittion to the hole-fix, you might try using lump charcaol.
DT





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Old 07-04-2005, 02:31 PM
Christine Allison
 
Posts: n/a
Default

You may not be using enough charcoal. The best practice is to burn at least
a chimney full and control the speed of burning with your cookers vents.

In general it's preferable to keep the exhaust vent open and control the
rate of combustion by adjusting the intake vent(s). If your stove parts are
not tight fitting and you have leaks this may be difficult.

Richard Smith

"Dave" wrote in message
nk.net...

"Rob" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Hi all,

I just got a Brinkman Smoker and am having problems keeping the

charcoal
hot. What is the secret to keeping the coals hot and do you mix your

wood
with your coals?

Thanks
Rob


I addittion to the hole-fix, you might try using lump charcaol.
DT





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Old 07-04-2005, 11:11 PM
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Christine Allison wrote:
You may not be using enough charcoal. The best practice is to burn
at least a chimney full and control the speed of burning with your
cookers vents.

In general it's preferable to keep the exhaust vent open and control
the rate of combustion by adjusting the intake vent(s). If your
stove parts are not tight fitting and you have leaks this may be
difficult.




Don't confuse him........a Brinkmann's vents *are* the leaks!

TFM®




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Old 07-04-2005, 11:11 PM
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Christine Allison wrote:
You may not be using enough charcoal. The best practice is to burn
at least a chimney full and control the speed of burning with your
cookers vents.

In general it's preferable to keep the exhaust vent open and control
the rate of combustion by adjusting the intake vent(s). If your
stove parts are not tight fitting and you have leaks this may be
difficult.




Don't confuse him........a Brinkmann's vents *are* the leaks!

TFM®


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Old 08-04-2005, 12:33 PM
Matthew L. Martin
 
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Default

TFM® wrote:
Christine Allison wrote:

You may not be using enough charcoal. The best practice is to burn
at least a chimney full and control the speed of burning with your
cookers vents.

In general it's preferable to keep the exhaust vent open and control
the rate of combustion by adjusting the intake vent(s). If your
stove parts are not tight fitting and you have leaks this may be
difficult.





Don't confuse him........a Brinkmann's vents *are* the leaks!


Even when stacked.

--
Matthew

I'm a contractor. If you want an opinion, I'll sell you one.
Which one do you want?
  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 08-04-2005, 12:33 PM
Matthew L. Martin
 
Posts: n/a
Default

TFM® wrote:
Christine Allison wrote:

You may not be using enough charcoal. The best practice is to burn
at least a chimney full and control the speed of burning with your
cookers vents.

In general it's preferable to keep the exhaust vent open and control
the rate of combustion by adjusting the intake vent(s). If your
stove parts are not tight fitting and you have leaks this may be
difficult.





Don't confuse him........a Brinkmann's vents *are* the leaks!


Even when stacked.

--
Matthew

I'm a contractor. If you want an opinion, I'll sell you one.
Which one do you want?


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