Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 19-10-2012, 12:38 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On 10/18/2012 8:34 AM, Brick wrote:
On 18-Oct-2012, wrote:

On Wed, 17 Oct 2012 22:52:30 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 03:29:03 +0000 (UTC), User Bp wrote:

wrote:

Your troll failed!

;-)

In a perverse way you're right. I live in Davis and the area is
abundantly provided with orchards: Almonds (dwindling), walnuts (lots)
plums and a few others. Every so often one of the orchards is
pulled up, like so many huge dandelions, and the wood retrieved
is set aside for some other use. I was hopeful that somebody would
know of a charcoal maker who uses it.

No such luck. Lazzari will certainly do, but I was hoping for
something more local.

People have posted here about making their own charcoal in the distant
past but I think the consensus is that the convenience factor of
buying it far outweighs the hassle of making lump in small quantities.

There's always the pre-burn method. Burn you cured or green wood down
in a separate pit then transfer the coals to your meat-smoking pits.
Again this is usually only reserved for larger operations (such as the
legacy BBQ restaurants here in Central TX) or for very large offset
smokers.

-sw


What Steve is referring to is called "barbecue" except that in traditional
barbecue the live coals would be placed directly under the meat somewhere
between 16 and 24 inches. Barbecue cannot be made in an offset smoker but
the resultant smoke-roasted meat is delicious nonetheless.

TFM®


Glad 'Fats' finished with that last line 'cause I have a video clip of him
chowing down on mine. And here, I've been calling it BBQ because
I didn't know any better. I thought if you slow cooked meat with fire
and smoke, you could call it BBQ. Now I have to figure out what to
call the stuff I make because I cook it in an offset pit.



It is called barbecue, whether in an offset or bullet style smoker with
a heat/flame defuser between the heat and the meat. I think TFM is just
wanting to cause a debate on the definition of barbecue.

We used to think barbecue was something cooked low and slow. We have
learned, that is not necessarily so. Big Jim has mentioned he has cooked
brisket at temps of 300 or more. No one complained it was not barbecue
at his New Years Day bash that he cooked at for 25 years.

My definition is meats cooked at under 300 using lump and/or wood.
Others definition may differ a little. If it is tender and delicious,
who cares? It is all good...

BBQ
--
“We are going to be gifted with a health care plan that we are forced to
purchase, and fined if we don’t, signed by a president who smokes, with
funding administered by a treasury chief who didn't pay his taxes, by a
government which has already bankrupted Social Security and Medicare,
all to be overseen by a surgeon general who is obese, and financed by a
country that’s broke.

Author Unknown

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Old 19-10-2012, 01:14 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 23:18:34 +0000 (UTC), gregz wrote:

TFM® wrote:
On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 15:30:36 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 16:08:16 -0400, TFM® wrote:

On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 13:40:58 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 13:34:47 GMT, Brick wrote:

Glad 'Fats' finished with that last line 'cause I have a video clip of him
chowing down on mine. And here, I've been calling it BBQ because
I didn't know any better. I thought if you slow cooked meat with fire
and smoke, you could call it BBQ. Now I have to figure out what to
call the stuff I make because I cook it in an offset pit.

Now I'm going to have to tell John Muller and Aaron Franklin, two of
the most popular pit masters in America, that what they're cooking is
not BBQ. And have them change the name of their restaurants, too.

Basically, what TFM is saying now is that BBQ really *is* grilling,
something that has been hotly debated here for way too many years.

That's not at all what I'm saying and I'll thank you kindly to remove your
words from my mouth.
I'll stand by my purist definition of traditional barbecue along with a
good many other folks. Some of them I even have respect for.

How is putting coals under the meat any different from grilling? And
how is cooking in a offset not barbecue? What DO you call smoking
meat in a offset if it's not barbecue in the most purist form of the
word?

Sorry if you feel offended, but your definition is just way to anal
for me. This is worse than the debates over grilling vs. BBQ, which I
always avoided. But now you hit a sore spot.

-sw


As I said earlier, if you'd been paying attention, an offset smoker
produces smoke roasted meat. By the same token, barbecue cannot be
produced in a Weber or a Brinkmann or any bullet smoker if the water pan is
in place, regardless of contents of said pan.

The difference in the flavor of the finished product cooked directly over
coals is so vastly different than that of smoke roasting as to constitute
another product entirely. Only one can be barbecue.

I don't mean to pick your scabs, but do try it yourself. You're duly
equipped with your ECB. Cook 2 nearly identical cuts of meat. One using
the water pan (with whatever you want in it) and the other with nothing but
air between the coals and the meat.
If you're diligent enough with the fire management you will have something
truly wonderful when you're done.

TFM®


The only difference I see is fat induced smoke. Temperature should be no
different, unless you want it to be different.

Greg


There you have it, it all boils down to temperature. NOT. It's just like
boiling and steaming are both cooking with hot water so temp is the only
consideration, right?
Hint: It's not all about temperature. There's magic in them there coals.

TFM®
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Old 19-10-2012, 01:16 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 19:10:46 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 18:38:51 -0500, bbq wrote:

It is called barbecue, whether in an offset or bullet style smoker with
a heat/flame defuser between the heat and the meat. I think TFM is just
wanting to cause a debate on the definition of barbecue.


I just think he's out of KGB.

-sw


Not out but certainly not partaking enough. Thanks for the reminder. I
now leave you to your previously scheduled programming.

TFM®
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Old 19-10-2012, 08:16 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Sqwertz" wrote in message
...
On Thu, 18 Oct 2012 13:34:47 GMT, Brick wrote:


Basically, what TFM is saying now is that BBQ really *is* grilling,
something that has been hotly debated here for way too many years.

-sw


OK little Buddy that Squirts off at the mouthg
"Barbecue" is not grilling.
Barbecue "IS" done over coals from burnt down logs at a greater distance,
say 16" to 24" in most cases. In some case it may be a bit closer because of
ash build-up.
"Grilling" is also done over coals, BUTT, the coals are very close to the
meat. Somewhere in the 6" or less range.
Also with a very hot fire.
When you are cooking barbecue the coals are not only much farther from the
meat, BUTT are spread very thin or even around the outside edges of whatever
you be cooking.
That is where the art comes in. Knowing where and when and how many coals
to use.
Originally to me Barbecue was never meant to have a heavy smoke flavor.
Grilling = hot and fast with coals close under the meat.
Barbecue = slow, cooler fire at a distance from the fire.
This is Southern Barbecue.
What in Texas is called Barbecue is a whole different animal.
For instance, the pits at Kuretz are offset pits with the fire in a pit on
one end of the pit.
There use to be a place in Dripping Springs (Riley's) that cooked on
Southern Pride Pits.
While Kuretz was good, especially the sausage and pork chop, I preferred
Riley's.
I don't get too testicle about it. If is pleasant to eat I am happy.
When I had my place I cooked on a Southern Pride, it wasn't TRUE Barbecue,
BUTT don't try to tell my customers that.
BeeJay


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Old 19-10-2012, 02:42 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Oct 19, 12:47*am, Nick Cramer wrote:
tutall wrote:


Nobody talks shit when stating that mesquite lump burns hot and had a
bitter bite, and oak lump has a sweeter smell.
But frame the discussion about carbon and all of sudden people lose
their memory? WTH?


OK. I use mesquite from Smart n' Final. For smoke, I use Kaffir lime from
our garden, corn cob, baby coconut or hickory chips.


Corn cob, coconut? Those are new to most of us I think. Can you expand
a bit on those two?

How dry are the cobs and what sort of aroma do they have, am trying to
imagine this.


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Old 19-10-2012, 03:36 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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tutall wrote:

Corn cob, coconut? Those are new to most of us I think. Can you expand
a bit on those two?

How dry are the cobs and what sort of aroma do they have, am trying to
imagine this.


Cobs ain't just for wiping! Folks in Cornistan,esp. places where trees
are rare have been smoking hams and bacons with cobs for decades.
Coconut shells make charcoal with practically ZERO odor. It's really
nice and mild when used as smoke wood.

monroe(no hickory in samoa)
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Old 20-10-2012, 02:58 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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tutall wrote:
On Oct 19, 12:47=A0am, Nick Cramer wrote:
tutall wrote:


Nobody talks shit when stating that mesquite lump burns hot and had a
bitter bite, and oak lump has a sweeter smell.
But frame the discussion about carbon and all of sudden people lose
their memory? WTH?


OK. I use mesquite from Smart n' Final. For smoke, I use Kaffir lime
from our garden, corn cob, baby coconut or hickory chips.


Corn cob, coconut? Those are new to most of us I think. Can you expand
a bit on those two?

How dry are the cobs and what sort of aroma do they have, am trying to
imagine this.


They're completely dried out. Both are sweet. Coconut is also smokier.

--
Nick, KI6VAV. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their
families: https://semperfifund.org https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/
http://www.specialops.org/ http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/ ~Semper Fi~
http://www.woundedwarriors.ca/ http://www.legacy.com.au/ ~Semper Fi~
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Old 20-10-2012, 05:44 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Oct 19, 8:27*pm, Sqwertz wrote:


Ahh, Behoove THIS!

-sw unzipping...



Texarkanians just can't hep themselves.

shaking head sadly, scuff toes...

beg

Heh

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Old 23-10-2012, 09:13 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On 10/17/2012 10:29 PM, User Bp wrote:
wrote:

Your troll failed!

;-)

In a perverse way you're right. I live in Davis and the area is
abundantly provided with orchards: Almonds (dwindling), walnuts (lots)
plums and a few others. Every so often one of the orchards is
pulled up, like so many huge dandelions, and the wood retrieved
is set aside for some other use. I was hopeful that somebody would
know of a charcoal maker who uses it.

No such luck. Lazzari will certainly do, but I was hoping for
something more local.

bob prohaska

check this out:
http://www.razoreye.net/mirror/charc...l%20Retort.htm
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Old 24-10-2012, 06:06 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Shawn Martin wrote:
check this out:
http://www.razoreye.net/mirror/charc...l%20Retort.htm


Good article! Where I live that would bring out the local FD in a
minute, the air pollution police in two. Out in the country it'd work.

bob prohaska



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Old 01-11-2012, 09:24 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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In article , User Bp wrote:

After a 14 year hiatus on solid fuel cooking I
restarted my charcoal barbecue, using the same
bag of briquetts.

At first lighting, the stench from the briquetts was
appalling. I'd completely forgotten how awful the odor
is. Once burned off they're ok, but I still don't like
it and the amount of ash suggests there's not much
charcoal in them. Who sells clean wood charcoal, in
lumps of about an inch? I'm in northern California,
not far from Sacramento. Something like almond or
walnut charcoal would be interesting to try.

Thanks for reading,

bob prohaska


Have you tried the Natural Foods Co-op on X street?
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Old 02-11-2012, 03:19 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" wrote:

Have you tried the Natural Foods Co-op on X street?


Not yet, but the next time I'm over that way I'll look.

Thank you!

bob

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Old 12-01-2013, 01:18 AM
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Ozark Oak.


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