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Zz Yzx 25-05-2012 01:17 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 
When you go to a fancy restaruant buffet like at a casino or a wedding
reception or whatever, and there's the guy or gal in a white apron and
a funny hat cutting slices of roast beef off a big chunk of beef with
a special knife....

What is that cut of meat? I remember hearing hte term "Steamboat
round". Also, I see a big chunk o' beef at Costco called a "sirloin".

Any help? How'd you cook such at home?

Thanks a heap.
-Zz
"Zz Yzx" rhymes with "physics"; or " Isaacs" if you prefer.
http://www.abandonedbutnotforgotten.com/zzyzx_road.htm

Pico Rico[_2_] 25-05-2012 01:23 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 

"Zz Yzx" wrote in message
...
When you go to a fancy restaruant buffet like at a casino or a wedding
reception or whatever, and there's the guy or gal in a white apron and
a funny hat cutting slices of roast beef off a big chunk of beef with
a special knife....

What is that cut of meat? I remember hearing hte term "Steamboat
round". Also, I see a big chunk o' beef at Costco called a "sirloin".

Any help? How'd you cook such at home?


steamship round, if it is what you mean (has a big bone in it). Like this:
http://www.benningtonstation.com/catering.htm

just season it and cook it.



Steve B[_13_] 25-05-2012 01:52 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 

"Zz Yzx" wrote in message
...
When you go to a fancy restaruant buffet like at a casino or a wedding
reception or whatever, and there's the guy or gal in a white apron and
a funny hat cutting slices of roast beef off a big chunk of beef with
a special knife....

What is that cut of meat? I remember hearing hte term "Steamboat
round". Also, I see a big chunk o' beef at Costco called a "sirloin".

Any help? How'd you cook such at home?

Thanks a heap.
-Zz
"Zz Yzx" rhymes with "physics"; or " Isaacs" if you prefer.
http://www.abandonedbutnotforgotten.com/zzyzx_road.htm


Long ago, and far away, in another galaxy, I was young, and growing up in
Las Vegas in the sixties. I was at the opening of the Tropicana in '57.
Buffets were $2.50. There was boiled shrimp, three types of herring, a big
ham, lots of dinner dishes, lots of salads, and at the end of the line what
was called a "baron of beef." It really looked like a cow's leg, with the
bone sticking up. The man in the white uniform and chef's hat would carve
you what you wanted. Ahhhhhhhhhhhh. Life was good in the sixties in Las
Vegas. $2.50 buffets, $2.95 16 ounce porterhouse with salad and baked
potato, and $.19 cent breakfast, two eggs, ham, bacon, or sausage, hash
browns, toast, and coffee.

Never knew what the cut was actually named, nor did I ever see it in the
market meat section. I imagine one could order one special. But, in those
days, it was common fare for every buffet that was a buffet.

Ah, the old days. When the mob ran the joints.

sigh ...........

Steve, an old timer from Vegas



The Public Library 25-05-2012 02:18 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On May 24, 8:17*pm, Zz Yzx wrote:
When you go to a fancy restaruant buffet like at a casino or a wedding
reception or whatever, and there's the guy or gal in a white apron and
a funny hat cutting slices of roast beef off a big chunk of beef with
a special knife....

What is that cut of meat? *I remember hearing hte term "Steamboat
round". *Also, I see a big chunk o' beef at Costco called a "sirloin".

Any help? *How'd you cook such at home?

Thanks a heap.
-Zz
"Zz Yzx" rhymes with "physics"; or " Isaacs" if you prefer.http://www.abandonedbutnotforgotten.com/zzyzx_road.htm


I don't know. We used to roast a whole hip of beef, take it out to
the banquet and carve it up for the client/customer. They were heavy
roasts. A chore to take out of the oven.

Ed Pawlowski 25-05-2012 03:16 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On Thu, 24 May 2012 17:17:20 -0700, Zz Yzx
wrote:

When you go to a fancy restaruant buffet like at a casino or a wedding
reception or whatever, and there's the guy or gal in a white apron and
a funny hat cutting slices of roast beef off a big chunk of beef with
a special knife....

What is that cut of meat? I remember hearing hte term "Steamboat
round". Also, I see a big chunk o' beef at Costco called a "sirloin".

Any help? How'd you cook such at home?

Thanks a heap.
-Zz
"Zz Yzx" rhymes with "physics"; or " Isaacs" if you prefer.
http://www.abandonedbutnotforgotten.com/zzyzx_road.htm



I'm not sure what they use, but I've had god results with a top round.
You can buy them at BJ's, Costco, etc.
I find that really big hunks of beef, slow cooked, come out
wonderful. Tasty and tender.

Going back about 7 years ago, I went out to Sand Diego to visit my
brother, and were joined by my sister and some of her husband's family
from England. With some local friends, the crowd was maybe 20 people.
I decided to cook a big hunk of beef on the Weber grill using indirect
heat, charcoal to one side. People still bring it up 7 years later,
they were so impressed. I may do one come Sunday when we have company
coming.

Zz Yzx 25-05-2012 03:37 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 
Going back about 7 years ago, I went out to Sand Diego to visit my
brother, and were joined by my sister and some of her husband's family
from England. With some local friends, the crowd was maybe 20 people.
I decided to cook a big hunk of beef on the Weber grill using indirect
heat, charcoal to one side. People still bring it up 7 years later,
they were so impressed. I may do one come Sunday when we have company
coming.


We'll be over next Saturday. 20-30 friends.

bbq 25-05-2012 04:11 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On 5/24/2012 7:52 PM, Steve B wrote:
"Zz wrote in message
...
When you go to a fancy restaruant buffet like at a casino or a wedding
reception or whatever, and there's the guy or gal in a white apron and
a funny hat cutting slices of roast beef off a big chunk of beef with
a special knife....

What is that cut of meat? I remember hearing hte term "Steamboat
round". Also, I see a big chunk o' beef at Costco called a "sirloin".

Any help? How'd you cook such at home?

Thanks a heap.
-Zz
"Zz Yzx" rhymes with "physics"; or " Isaacs" if you prefer.
http://www.abandonedbutnotforgotten.com/zzyzx_road.htm


Long ago, and far away, in another galaxy, I was young, and growing up in
Las Vegas in the sixties. I was at the opening of the Tropicana in '57.
Buffets were $2.50. There was boiled shrimp, three types of herring, a big
ham, lots of dinner dishes, lots of salads, and at the end of the line what
was called a "baron of beef." It really looked like a cow's leg, with the
bone sticking up. The man in the white uniform and chef's hat would carve
you what you wanted. Ahhhhhhhhhhhh. Life was good in the sixties in Las
Vegas. $2.50 buffets, $2.95 16 ounce porterhouse with salad and baked
potato, and $.19 cent breakfast, two eggs, ham, bacon, or sausage, hash
browns, toast, and coffee.

Never knew what the cut was actually named, nor did I ever see it in the
market meat section. I imagine one could order one special. But, in those
days, it was common fare for every buffet that was a buffet.

Ah, the old days. When the mob ran the joints.

sigh ...........

Steve, an old timer from Vegas




Casino restaurant prices are not the special prices of days gone past,
from what I have heard. I have not been to Vegas in 20 years. Then, I
got a Prime Rib dinner for $4.95, a full breakfast $1.99. With casinos
in many states now, Vegas has had to raise the specials. And lower the
odds, at least on blackjack,6-5 on a blackjack).

Living in the Twin Cities of Minnesota, I have 3 casinos within 45
minute drive. Two of the 3 have decent buffets at a reasonable price. I
have no reason to go to Vegas now, unless I just wanted to get out of
town for a few days. If that's the case, I got other places to visit to.
Vegas is not what it once was..

BBQ
--
Vegetarian

An old Indian term for poor hunter...

bbq 25-05-2012 04:14 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On 5/24/2012 7:56 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
On Thu, 24 May 2012 17:17:20 -0700, Zz Yzx wrote:

When you go to a fancy restaruant buffet like at a casino or a wedding
reception or whatever, and there's the guy or gal in a white apron and
a funny hat cutting slices of roast beef off a big chunk of beef with
a special knife....

What is that cut of meat?


Steamship round.

Also, I see a big chunk o' beef at Costco called a "sirloin".


That is a whole top sirloin.

Here's one that's been smoked and roasted (USDA Prime):

http://www.flickr.com/photos/7275891...n/photostream/

That is boneless.

Any help? How'd you cook such at home?


Which one? I've never cooked a steamship, but the sirloin you would
ideally sear at high heat and turn down and roast at low temp 240F
until it reaches 128F or so.

Then eat beef ALL WEEK LONG:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/sqwertz...in/photostream

-sw



Gorgeous sliced beef.. But I bet brick could slice it thinner !!!!

BBQ
--
Vegetarian

An old Indian term for poor hunter...

bbq 25-05-2012 04:21 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On 5/24/2012 9:16 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
On Thu, 24 May 2012 17:17:20 -0700, Zz
wrote:

When you go to a fancy restaruant buffet like at a casino or a wedding
reception or whatever, and there's the guy or gal in a white apron and
a funny hat cutting slices of roast beef off a big chunk of beef with
a special knife....

What is that cut of meat? I remember hearing hte term "Steamboat
round". Also, I see a big chunk o' beef at Costco called a "sirloin".

Any help? How'd you cook such at home?

Thanks a heap.
-Zz
"Zz Yzx" rhymes with "physics"; or " Isaacs" if you prefer.
http://www.abandonedbutnotforgotten.com/zzyzx_road.htm



I'm not sure what they use, but I've had god results with a top round.
You can buy them at BJ's, Costco, etc.
I find that really big hunks of beef, slow cooked, come out
wonderful. Tasty and tender.

Going back about 7 years ago, I went out to Sand Diego to visit my
brother, and were joined by my sister and some of her husband's family
from England. With some local friends, the crowd was maybe 20 people.
I decided to cook a big hunk of beef on the Weber grill using indirect
heat, charcoal to one side. People still bring it up 7 years later,
they were so impressed. I may do one come Sunday when we have company
coming.



Great work. Going out of town and using others equipment to cook a hunk
of beef and remembered years later for the great cook.

I can only make jerky out of round. Though I have not tried a roast
size, just steaks..

BBQ
--
Vegetarian

An old Indian term for poor hunter...

Zz Yzx 25-05-2012 04:56 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 

I can only make jerky out of round. Though I have not tried a roast
size, just steaks..

BBQ


I've had many pounds of round jerkey

Steve B[_13_] 25-05-2012 06:51 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 

"bbq" wrote

Vegas is not what it once was..

BBQ



Ya got that right. I still go once or twice a month, and that's for
business. Love it when I clear the city limits, and head back up to Utah.
Many forces at work in Vegas now that weren't there five, ten, twenty years
ago.

Steve



Tutall 25-05-2012 07:19 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On May 24, 10:51*pm, "Steve B" wrote:
"bbq" wrote

Vegas is not what it once was..


BBQ


Ya got that right. *I still go once or twice a month, and that's for
business. *Love it when I clear the city limits, and head back up to Utah.
Many forces at work in Vegas now that weren't there five, ten, twenty years
ago.

Steve


Be interested in hearing what you think those might be?

And how, presumably, mob influence was, in some ways, maybe
preferrable, or better? But I thought that was more like 30 years ago.

But you could well be speaking about other things.


[email protected] 25-05-2012 01:28 PM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On Thu, 24 May 2012 17:23:46 -0700, "Pico Rico"
wrote:


"Zz Yzx" wrote in message
.. .
When you go to a fancy restaruant buffet like at a casino or a wedding
reception or whatever, and there's the guy or gal in a white apron and
a funny hat cutting slices of roast beef off a big chunk of beef with
a special knife....

What is that cut of meat? I remember hearing hte term "Steamboat
round". Also, I see a big chunk o' beef at Costco called a "sirloin".

Any help? How'd you cook such at home?


steamship round, if it is what you mean (has a big bone in it). Like this:
http://www.benningtonstation.com/catering.htm

just season it and cook it.


I have to disagree. I've cooked a steamship on a spit several times
and it never had a bone in it. The steamship is a rolled and comes
form the hind quarter of beef. It is the meat cut off of the rump and
leg and includes the top sirloin. It's basically from the hip of the
cow and down the leg in one big piece.






Shinglhed
Eat, drink, and be merry.....and by all means over do it!

Steve B[_13_] 25-05-2012 02:31 PM

What cut of beef is this?
 

"tutall" wrote in message
...
On May 24, 10:51 pm, "Steve B" wrote:
"bbq" wrote

Vegas is not what it once was..


BBQ


Ya got that right. I still go once or twice a month, and that's for
business. Love it when I clear the city limits, and head back up to Utah.
Many forces at work in Vegas now that weren't there five, ten, twenty
years
ago.

Steve


Be interested in hearing what you think those might be?

And how, presumably, mob influence was, in some ways, maybe
preferrable, or better? But I thought that was more like 30 years ago.

But you could well be speaking about other things.



The Gaming Control Board became populated with Mormons in the early 60's,
and that was the beginning of the end for the mafia. I guess some of the
last to go was the gang at the Stardust, as in the movie, Casino, which was
based on the Stardust. I worked at the Stardust as a parking attendant from
'68 to '70, when I went to the Dunes. A 300# man with a trench coat and
fedora would come out about 8 AM carrying a brief case, flanked by two
security guards with guns. They would put him in a cab. He was going to
Kansas City to take the skim from the casino to the KC boys. It was like
that all over town.

Back when, the town was 60,000. If you could haul bags or count to twenty
one, or were a decent looking chick, or was a polite clean man, you could
make from $40 to $100 a day in tokes when minimum wage was $1 an hour.
House payments were from $40-$150 a month. A new Caddy was $,3,000. Gas
was $.25 a gal. And for $200, you had a 3,000 sf house on an acre with a
pool. A nice apartment was $150 a month in a complex filled with car
parkers, dealers, cocktail waitresses, hotel employees. The pool was always
jumping, and the doors were open. It was one continuous party. There was
no IRS bite out of your tokes. Breakfast was a buck, and a prime rib dinner
was $3, and two people could go to a dinner show, and with tab, tax, and
tokes, get out for $30, and see top name entertainers and shows.

The mob were fair kind monarchs. The attitude was, "do your job, make the
customer happy, don't steal, and you will receive your fair slice of the
pie." The big bosses roamed freely over the whole hotel, and knew everyone
by their names. At Christmas, money, booze, and turkeys flowed freely.
Special envelopes for doing special favors were all over the place.
Supervisors were chosen from people who had good people skills, rather than
just being the nastiest one who would enforce corporate policy, or just the
last one standing.

I used to go back to the time shack and say, "Punch out all the parking
attendants." Now you have to go there, and be on video, and do it yourself.
I worked as an extra parking cars for two years before I became permanent,
and I'd go to the time shack, and say, I'm punching in for Ralph Smith, and
they would do it, and Ralph would get paid for that day, and I'd get the
tokes.

Comps (complimentary drinks, food, rooms, limo service, and hot and cold
running women) were given to almost anyone. If someone blew their money,
they'd send them home in a cab, and pay the driver, tip and all. They took
care of their "whales", the heavy players. A guy would drop a good chunk of
change at the tables, and when he went to pay his bill for the hotel, it
was, "Oh, that has been taken care of from Mr. XXXXX in the pit. Thank you,
and hope you had a good time." Of course, they flew him out, and flew him
back home, too.

Benny Binion said it, "Just get them in here with food and booze, and I'll
get their money on the tables."

If someone had a sick child, the insurance would pick up the tab. If there
was something special to be done, the hat was passed, and I have heard of
times when $5,000 was raised, and that's probably worth 50 today. I know
many times when people were paid and taking care of a sick child at home,
not being docked.

Common sense prevailed. Friendships were honored, and if someone
recommended you for a job, that's usually how you got in. If you had a good
reputation, you were set for life. If you were a screw up, you didn't do so
good. One phone call could find out all they needed to know about you, and
word traveled fast as to whether or not you were "good".

The bosses knew everyone's name, and spoke to you like your Uncle Lew.
EEEHHHHHHHHH............ Howya doin? Wife okay? You need anything? You
come see me if you need annyting. Take care. See ya. And, you could go
see the man if you had a problem.

The town was smaller. Easier to get around. Lots of cross town rivalry
among the high schools, and the obligatory fist fights at football games,
and all. But nothing like today. The police were fair, but were not averse
to thumping some guy and dropping him at the city limits sign with a warning
not to come back. The hotel security were not above thumping people and
putting them in a dumpster, but you had to be like a third time offender to
get that. Binnions Horseshoe got sued as late as the 80's before they
finally quit. You could leave your keys in your car, and your door
unlocked. If you didn't have a job, it was just because you were lazy, or
taking a break between construction projects, because you could find work in
one day.

Today, there's over a million, maybe a million and a half in the whole
valley. It is dangerous on the streets, and I carry pepper spray. I did
not have my CCF renewed because of the reciprocity law with Utah, but could
get one. I had four over the years. There is a totally different mindset
in Las Vegas now, both the workers and the monarchs.

Steve



Ed Pawlowski 26-05-2012 03:17 AM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On Fri, 25 May 2012 09:45:25 -0500, Sqwertz
wrote:

Does not include top sirloin. Kinda defeats the purpose of a
steamship ROUND.

-sw


http://askabutcher.proboards.com/ind...play&thread=59
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The "Steamship Round" is basically the whole primal Round (Top Round,
Bottom Round and Eye Round) with the shankmeat removed from the bone
and the Sirloin Tip removed. But, that depends on the packer also. It
can weigh up to 50-60 lbs, sometimes smaller, depending on the size of
the cow.

It's great for 'display' purposes and putting on a show for large
groups. It is best slow cooked on a spit, unless you have a large
commercial oven available. Most chefs will sit the cooked roast
standing up (bone in the air) and slice the meat thin. The tricky part
here is that the grain will run in different directions, keeping the
carver on his toes. Sliced thin against the grain, the meat will be
relatively tender.

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dicti...amship%20round
Definition of STEAMSHIP ROUND
: a large beef roast consisting of the whole round with rump and heel
First Known Use of STEAMSHIP ROUND
1964

David Harmon[_2_] 26-05-2012 05:36 PM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On Fri, 25 May 2012 09:45:25 -0500 in alt.food.barbecue, Sqwertz
wrote,
99 out of 100 times a steamship round is going to have a bone in it.
The part of the beauty of the presentation. It even comes in a pork
version.


So then the pork version would be a "whole ham" except not cured or
smoked?

The Public Library 27-05-2012 06:21 PM

What cut of beef is this?
 
On May 25, 9:31*am, "Steve B" wrote:
"tutall" wrote in message

...
On May 24, 10:51 pm, "Steve B" wrote:

"bbq" wrote


Vegas is not what it once was..


BBQ


Ya got that right. I still go once or twice a month, and that's for
business. Love it when I clear the city limits, and head back up to Utah.
Many forces at work in Vegas now that weren't there five, ten, twenty
years
ago.


Steve


Be interested in hearing what you think those might be?

And how, presumably, mob influence was, in some ways, maybe
preferrable, or better? But I thought that was more like 30 years ago.

But you could well be speaking about other things.



The Gaming Control Board became populated with Mormons in the early 60's,
and that was the beginning of the end for the mafia. *I guess some of the
last to go was the gang at the Stardust, as in the movie, Casino, which was
based on the Stardust. *I worked at the Stardust as a parking attendant from
'68 to '70, when I went to the Dunes. *A 300# man with a trench coat and
fedora would come out about 8 AM carrying a brief case, flanked by two
security guards with guns. *They would put him in a cab. *He was going to
Kansas City to take the skim from the casino to the KC boys. *It was like
that all over town.

Back when, the town was 60,000. *If you could haul bags or count to twenty
one, or were a decent looking chick, or was a polite clean man, you could
make from $40 to $100 a day in tokes when minimum wage was $1 an hour.
House payments were from $40-$150 a month. *A new Caddy was $,3,000. *Gas
was $.25 a gal. *And for $200, you had a 3,000 sf house on an acre with a
pool. *A nice apartment was $150 a month in a complex filled with car
parkers, dealers, cocktail waitresses, hotel employees. *The pool was always
jumping, and the doors were open. *It was one continuous party. *There was
no IRS bite out of your tokes. *Breakfast was a buck, and a prime rib dinner
was $3, and two people could go to a dinner show, and with tab, tax, and
tokes, get out for $30, and see top name entertainers and shows.

The mob were fair kind monarchs. *The attitude was, "do your job, make the
customer happy, don't steal, and you will receive your fair slice of the
pie." *The big bosses roamed freely over the whole hotel, and knew everyone
by their names. *At Christmas, money, booze, and turkeys flowed freely.
Special envelopes for doing special favors were all over the place.
Supervisors were chosen from people who had good people skills, rather than
just being the nastiest one who would enforce corporate policy, or just the
last one standing.

I used to go back to the time shack and say, "Punch out all the parking
attendants." *Now you have to go there, and be on video, and do it yourself.
I worked as an extra parking cars for two years before I became permanent,
and I'd go to the time shack, and say, I'm punching in for Ralph Smith, and
they would do it, and Ralph would get paid for that day, and I'd get the
tokes.

Comps (complimentary drinks, food, rooms, limo service, and hot and cold
running women) were given to almost anyone. *If someone blew their money,
they'd send them home in a cab, and pay the driver, tip and all. *They took
care of their "whales", the heavy players. *A guy would drop a good chunk of
change at the tables, and when he went to pay his bill for the hotel, it
was, "Oh, that has been taken care of from Mr. XXXXX in the pit. *Thank you,
and hope you had a good time." *Of course, they flew him out, and flew him
back home, too.

Benny Binion said it, "Just get them in here with food and booze, and I'll
get their money on the tables."

If someone had a sick child, the insurance would pick up the tab. *If there
was something special to be done, the hat was passed, and I have heard of
times when $5,000 was raised, and that's probably worth 50 today. *I know
many times when people were paid and taking care of a sick child at home,
not being docked.

Common sense prevailed. *Friendships were honored, and if someone
recommended you for a job, that's usually how you got in. *If you had a good
reputation, you were set for life. *If you were a screw up, you didn't do so
good. *One phone call could find out all they needed to know about you, and
word traveled fast as to whether or not you were "good".

The bosses knew everyone's name, and spoke to you like your Uncle Lew.
EEEHHHHHHHHH............ *Howya doin? *Wife okay? *You need anything? *You
come see me if you need annyting. *Take care. *See ya. *And, you could go
see the man if you had a problem.

The town was smaller. *Easier to get around. *Lots of cross town rivalry
among the high schools, and the obligatory fist fights at football games,
and all. *But nothing like today. *The police were fair, but were not averse
to thumping some guy and dropping him at the city limits sign with a warning
not to come back. *The hotel security were not above thumping people and
putting them in a dumpster, but you had to be like a third time offender to
get that. *Binnions Horseshoe got sued as late as the 80's before they
finally quit. *You could leave your keys in your car, and your door
unlocked. *If you didn't have a job, it was just because you were lazy, or
taking a break between construction projects, because you could find work in
one day.

Today, there's over a million, maybe a million and a half in the whole
valley. *It is dangerous on the streets, and I carry pepper spray. *I did
not have my CCF renewed because of the reciprocity law with Utah, but could
get one. *I had four over the years. *There is a totally different mindset
in Las Vegas now, both the workers and the monarchs.

Steve


Sounds like Vegas was the place to be back then. I haven't been there
since '92. I did enjoy it though.


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