Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 09-07-2012, 12:25 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Pastrami

Janet,

Here is a repost from some time ago by Ed. I saved it for the recipe.
Thanks again Ed.



On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 00:05:25 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"
wrote:


"L G" wrote

Why would that make a difference? I don't want to screw it up.


Doing a small piece it will dry out. I do full corned briskets or nothing
to make pastrami. If you do a small piece it will be difficujlt to tell
what is pastrami and what is the lump of charcoal.

Here are two methods



What is pastrami and how do I make my own?

For best results, use trimmed briskets.


Start with a curing brine. This makes enough for 25 lbs of meat.


5 quarts ice water (about 38-40F)
8 oz. salt
5 oz. Prague Powder #1
5 oz. powdered dextrose
1 Tb garlic juice

Prepare and cure as for corned beef.

After curing, remove from brine and rub liberally with cracked black pepper
and coriander seeds.

Smoke at 140F until the meat is dry and then increase smoker temperature to
200-220F and hold until internal temperature of meat reaches 170-180F.

Chill overnight before using. This meat is fully cooked.

Pastrami

4 pounds beef flank or brisket
1/2 cup coarse (kosher) salt
2 tablespoons (packed) dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon ground ginger
1 tablespoon coarsely cracked black peppercorns
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 tablespoons coriander seeds, coarsely cracked

With a trussing needle or a large darning needle threaded with twine, take a
stitch through the narrow end of the meat, Bring out both ends of the string
and make a loop about 3 inches long for hanging. Mix together thoroughly
the salt, brown sugar, ginger, pepper, garlic, and coriander. Rub the
mixture into every part of the meat's surface, massaging it well and coating
it evenly.

Wrap the meat in aluminum) foil and then enclose it in a plastic bag.
Refrigerate for 8 to 12 days, turning the package daily or as often as you
think of it. Remove the seasoned meat from the package, patting onto it any
seasonings that may have fallen off.

Hang it by its cord loop in a cool, breezy spot (70 degrees or less is
ideal) or in front of an electric fan; let dry for 24 hours. Remove the
shelves from the smoker, hang an oven thermometer in it, and preheat it
following the manufacturer's instructions (or, lacking instructions, preheat
for 45 minutes), adding a painful of presoaked hickory or other hardwood
chips (see page 31) after about 30 minutes. When smoke begins to emerge
from the vent, hang the pastrami in the smoker, close the door, and smoke
steadily for from 2 to 4 hours, depending on the heat your smoker produces
(2 hours will be enough if the temperature is as high as 150 degrees) and
the degree of smokiness you like; smoke the longer time if the temperature
inside the smoker is in the 100- to 120-degree range.

Cool the pastrami, then wrap and refrigerate overnight or for up to 2 or 3
days before cooking.

To cook: Cover the pastrami with a generous amount of cold water and simmer
very gently until completely tender, at least 2 hours; the exact time will
depend on the thickness of the meat.

Cool partially in the cooking water, then either serve at once or drain,
cool, and refrigerate, wrapped. To reheat cooked pastrami, slice thin (cut
on the bias slightly as you would flank steak) and steam briefly until hot
through







Shinglhed
Eat, drink, and be merry.....and by all means over do it!

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Old 09-07-2012, 02:37 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Pastrami

On 7/9/2012 6:25 AM, wrote:
Janet,

Here is a repost from some time ago by Ed. I saved it for the recipe.
Thanks again Ed.



On Sun, 10 Apr 2011 00:05:25 -0400, "Ed Pawlowski"
wrote:


"L wrote

Why would that make a difference? I don't want to screw it up.


Doing a small piece it will dry out. I do full corned briskets or nothing
to make pastrami. If you do a small piece it will be difficujlt to tell
what is pastrami and what is the lump of charcoal.

Here are two methods



What is pastrami and how do I make my own?

For best results, use trimmed briskets.


Start with a curing brine. This makes enough for 25 lbs of meat.


5 quarts ice water (about 38-40F)
8 oz. salt
5 oz. Prague Powder #1
5 oz. powdered dextrose
1 Tb garlic juice

Prepare and cure as for corned beef.

After curing, remove from brine and rub liberally with cracked black pepper
and coriander seeds.

Smoke at 140F until the meat is dry and then increase smoker temperature to
200-220F and hold until internal temperature of meat reaches 170-180F.

Chill overnight before using. This meat is fully cooked.

Pastrami

4 pounds beef flank or brisket
1/2 cup coarse (kosher) salt
2 tablespoons (packed) dark brown sugar
1 tablespoon ground ginger
1 tablespoon coarsely cracked black peppercorns
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 tablespoons coriander seeds, coarsely cracked

With a trussing needle or a large darning needle threaded with twine, take a
stitch through the narrow end of the meat, Bring out both ends of the string
and make a loop about 3 inches long for hanging. Mix together thoroughly
the salt, brown sugar, ginger, pepper, garlic, and coriander. Rub the
mixture into every part of the meat's surface, massaging it well and coating
it evenly.

Wrap the meat in aluminum) foil and then enclose it in a plastic bag.
Refrigerate for 8 to 12 days, turning the package daily or as often as you
think of it. Remove the seasoned meat from the package, patting onto it any
seasonings that may have fallen off.

Hang it by its cord loop in a cool, breezy spot (70 degrees or less is
ideal) or in front of an electric fan; let dry for 24 hours. Remove the
shelves from the smoker, hang an oven thermometer in it, and preheat it
following the manufacturer's instructions (or, lacking instructions, preheat
for 45 minutes), adding a painful of presoaked hickory or other hardwood
chips (see page 31) after about 30 minutes. When smoke begins to emerge
from the vent, hang the pastrami in the smoker, close the door, and smoke
steadily for from 2 to 4 hours, depending on the heat your smoker produces
(2 hours will be enough if the temperature is as high as 150 degrees) and
the degree of smokiness you like; smoke the longer time if the temperature
inside the smoker is in the 100- to 120-degree range.

Cool the pastrami, then wrap and refrigerate overnight or for up to 2 or 3
days before cooking.

To cook: Cover the pastrami with a generous amount of cold water and simmer
very gently until completely tender, at least 2 hours; the exact time will
depend on the thickness of the meat.

Cool partially in the cooking water, then either serve at once or drain,
cool, and refrigerate, wrapped. To reheat cooked pastrami, slice thin (cut
on the bias slightly as you would flank steak) and steam briefly until hot
through


Thanks. I saved it.


--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.
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Old 09-07-2012, 03:46 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Pastrami


"Pico Rico" wrote:


But, if you cook it after smoking, covered in water, won't the rubbed spices
wash off?


My one fiftieth of a dollar?
A one-day soak has always reduced the salt enough for me.
Hot smoke it and slice it. Why futz with it more than necessary?

monroe(apparently not as picky as some)
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Old 09-07-2012, 05:41 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Pastrami

On Monday, April 11, 2011 8:31:00 PM UTC-4, L G wrote:
Sqwertz wrote:
On Sat, 09 Apr 2011 23:17:02 -0400, L G wrote:


pamjd wrote:

On Apr 9, 8:39 pm, wrote:


On Sat, 09 Apr 2011 21:11:14 -0400, L G wrote:


I have a corned beef we are cooking tomorrow. I want to take a small
piece of it and smoke it to make pastrami. I have a WSM and a gas
Masterbuilt that is new and never used. Any tips?


Smoke the whole thing or nothing at all.


Yep


Why? This is a test. I'm talking about 1-2#'s.

You can't smoke 1.5lbs of brisket without it drying out. There's too
much surface area per amount of meat.

If it's a whole corned beef brisket, you could get away with carving
off the whole point from the flat and smoking that.

Or just put your foot down. You got a new smoker. Tell the wife
she'll just have to go out and get another one if she insists on
simmering or baking it.

-sw

I got Pastrami jerky. So you were right. Is it really better with the
whole brisket?

It was also salty as hell. I'm guessing I would have to soak the meat
in water next time?


My husband soaks ours and changes the water over a 2 day period, keeping it in the refrig. Just plain water for the soak. And then he cooks like a brisket. Good Luck, they are really good, may still be a little salty.
Nan in DE


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Old 09-07-2012, 06:49 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Pastrami

On 7/9/2012 9:46 AM, monroe, of course wrote:
"Pico wrote:


But, if you cook it after smoking, covered in water, won't the rubbed spices
wash off?


My one fiftieth of a dollar?
A one-day soak has always reduced the salt enough for me.
Hot smoke it and slice it. Why futz with it more than necessary?

monroe(apparently not as picky as some)


I never even soak it. I just don't add anything else to it.
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Old 09-07-2012, 10:58 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Pastrami

In article ,
Shawn Martin wrote:

I never even soak it. I just don't add anything else to it.


I may be mistook,but I think a 24hr soak plumps it up a tad.
Rub with cracked BP and coriander and,FWIW,I like alder smoke best.

monroe(strami's s'posed to be salty)


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