Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
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Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

So I'm going to try smoking in my Char Broil Silver for the first time
tomorrow. Copied and saved the "Easy Offset" guide from a little
while ago. But any other advice on how I need to keep my heat under
control? I see people mention needing to add fuel pretty frequently
but how much are we talking about? A few chunks here and there or
what? Just doing some chicken and ribs so hopefully can't mess them
up too bad.

Jesse
  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
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Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Jesse Skeens wrote:
> So I'm going to try smoking in my Char Broil Silver for the first time
> tomorrow. Copied and saved the "Easy Offset" guide from a little
> while ago. But any other advice on how I need to keep my heat under
> control? I see people mention needing to add fuel pretty frequently
> but how much are we talking about? A few chunks here and there or
> what? Just doing some chicken and ribs so hopefully can't mess them
> up too bad.
>
> Jesse


What's your fuel source? Can't advise very well if we dont know what you're
using. Lump, briquets, logs, mixture, what?

--



  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Jesse Skeens wrote:
> So I'm going to try smoking in my Char Broil Silver for the first time
> tomorrow. Copied and saved the "Easy Offset" guide from a little
> while ago. But any other advice on how I need to keep my heat under
> control? I see people mention needing to add fuel pretty frequently
> but how much are we talking about? A few chunks here and there or
> what? Just doing some chicken and ribs so hopefully can't mess them
> up too bad.
>
> Jesse


What's your fuel source? Can't advise very well if we dont know what you're
using. Lump, briquets, logs, mixture, what?

--



  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
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Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

"Duwop" > wrote in message >...
> Jesse Skeens wrote:
> > So I'm going to try smoking in my Char Broil Silver for the first time
> > tomorrow. Copied and saved the "Easy Offset" guide from a little
> > while ago. But any other advice on how I need to keep my heat under
> > control? I see people mention needing to add fuel pretty frequently
> > but how much are we talking about? A few chunks here and there or
> > what? Just doing some chicken and ribs so hopefully can't mess them
> > up too bad.
> >
> > Jesse

>
> What's your fuel source? Can't advise very well if we dont know what you're
> using. Lump, briquets, logs, mixture, what?


Sorry, lump along with some hickory chunks for smoke.

Jesse
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
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Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

"Duwop" > wrote in message >...
> Jesse Skeens wrote:
> > So I'm going to try smoking in my Char Broil Silver for the first time
> > tomorrow. Copied and saved the "Easy Offset" guide from a little
> > while ago. But any other advice on how I need to keep my heat under
> > control? I see people mention needing to add fuel pretty frequently
> > but how much are we talking about? A few chunks here and there or
> > what? Just doing some chicken and ribs so hopefully can't mess them
> > up too bad.
> >
> > Jesse

>
> What's your fuel source? Can't advise very well if we dont know what you're
> using. Lump, briquets, logs, mixture, what?


Sorry, lump along with some hickory chunks for smoke.

Jesse


  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
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Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Jesse Skeens wrote:
>> Jesse Skeens wrote:
>>> So I'm going to try smoking in my Char Broil Silver for the first
>>> time
>>> tomorrow. Copied and saved the "Easy Offset" guide from a little
>>> while ago. But any other advice on how I need to keep my heat under
>>> control? I see people mention needing to add fuel pretty frequently
>>> but how much are we talking about? A few chunks here and there or
>>> what? Just doing some chicken and ribs so hopefully can't mess them
>>> up too bad.
>>>

> Sorry, lump along with some hickory chunks for smoke.


I assume lump like B&B or something with pretty regular smallish chunks
then.

All this works pretty much on my offset, YMMV.

Well, if you want to make it easier on yourself, try and plan to cook at
275-225 with some spikes going over and under that. I tend to start out with
a hot fire to get a good bed of coals and get the cooker hot, takes my
cooker about 20-30 minutes to get fully up to temp, So I'll usually add some
lump to the starting pile when I add the cold meat on. The larger pile will
last longer, but get hotter. And the new coal starting up puts off some nice
smoke. That'll heat up and wait until it gets down to around 230-240ish
then replenish with one or two double handfulls (depending on coal bed size)
.. Temps'll go down for a bit before climbing again. You can get extra time
out of your pile by putting the chunks on towards the end of the cycle. Big
wood chunks can put off a lot of heat.
If you have the time and inclination you can add smaller loads more often
too. This would be to keep the temps closer to the 240-250 region. Or mix
and match, dont want to have to look for a bit, add a larger amount, got
time, add smaller bits. Scientific eh? Most of this is with the intake open
about 1" and the exhaust full open.

Course, some days none of this works picture perfect for some damn reason.
You got a flat'ish fireplace shovel to scrape out excess ash from under the
firegrate? Shouldnt need it on a 5-6 hour cook, but shit happens.

If you want a steadier lower temp it takes a smaller load of fuel and
therefore more tending. But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what the
doctor ordered. Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do honey-do's
and whatnot. Poor bassards.

Good luck, good eats.
--



  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Jesse Skeens wrote:
>> Jesse Skeens wrote:
>>> So I'm going to try smoking in my Char Broil Silver for the first
>>> time
>>> tomorrow. Copied and saved the "Easy Offset" guide from a little
>>> while ago. But any other advice on how I need to keep my heat under
>>> control? I see people mention needing to add fuel pretty frequently
>>> but how much are we talking about? A few chunks here and there or
>>> what? Just doing some chicken and ribs so hopefully can't mess them
>>> up too bad.
>>>

> Sorry, lump along with some hickory chunks for smoke.


I assume lump like B&B or something with pretty regular smallish chunks
then.

All this works pretty much on my offset, YMMV.

Well, if you want to make it easier on yourself, try and plan to cook at
275-225 with some spikes going over and under that. I tend to start out with
a hot fire to get a good bed of coals and get the cooker hot, takes my
cooker about 20-30 minutes to get fully up to temp, So I'll usually add some
lump to the starting pile when I add the cold meat on. The larger pile will
last longer, but get hotter. And the new coal starting up puts off some nice
smoke. That'll heat up and wait until it gets down to around 230-240ish
then replenish with one or two double handfulls (depending on coal bed size)
.. Temps'll go down for a bit before climbing again. You can get extra time
out of your pile by putting the chunks on towards the end of the cycle. Big
wood chunks can put off a lot of heat.
If you have the time and inclination you can add smaller loads more often
too. This would be to keep the temps closer to the 240-250 region. Or mix
and match, dont want to have to look for a bit, add a larger amount, got
time, add smaller bits. Scientific eh? Most of this is with the intake open
about 1" and the exhaust full open.

Course, some days none of this works picture perfect for some damn reason.
You got a flat'ish fireplace shovel to scrape out excess ash from under the
firegrate? Shouldnt need it on a 5-6 hour cook, but shit happens.

If you want a steadier lower temp it takes a smaller load of fuel and
therefore more tending. But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what the
doctor ordered. Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do honey-do's
and whatnot. Poor bassards.

Good luck, good eats.
--



  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
frohe
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Duwop wrote:
> But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
> beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what
> the doctor ordered.


Most times Sunday is my cookin day & since I try to read a book a
month this is a good time to sit out on the porch to sip a few and let
my mind get into the book.

Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do
> honey-do's and whatnot. Poor bassards.


Wash your mouth out!!! lol Just because we got a "set it and forget
it" cooker don't mean we ain't skilled in the ways of avoidin work.

Really tendin the fire today - got a brisket goin in the ol 55 gallon
barrel and it's supposed to be over 100F outside. Oh well, more
beer!

--
-frohe Life is too short to be in a hurry


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
frohe
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Duwop wrote:
> But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
> beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what
> the doctor ordered.


Most times Sunday is my cookin day & since I try to read a book a
month this is a good time to sit out on the porch to sip a few and let
my mind get into the book.

Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do
> honey-do's and whatnot. Poor bassards.


Wash your mouth out!!! lol Just because we got a "set it and forget
it" cooker don't mean we ain't skilled in the ways of avoidin work.

Really tendin the fire today - got a brisket goin in the ol 55 gallon
barrel and it's supposed to be over 100F outside. Oh well, more
beer!

--
-frohe Life is too short to be in a hurry


  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 08:45:49 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:

>Jesse Skeens wrote:


>If you have the time and inclination you can add smaller loads more often
>too. This would be to keep the temps closer to the 240-250 region. Or mix
>and match, dont want to have to look for a bit, add a larger amount, got
>time, add smaller bits. Scientific eh? Most of this is with the intake open
>about 1" and the exhaust full open.
>
>Course, some days none of this works picture perfect for some damn reason.
>You got a flat'ish fireplace shovel to scrape out excess ash from under the
>firegrate? Shouldnt need it on a 5-6 hour cook, but shit happens.
>
>If you want a steadier lower temp it takes a smaller load of fuel and
>therefore more tending. But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
>beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what the
>doctor ordered. Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do honey-do's
>and whatnot. Poor bassards.
>
>Good luck, good eats.


Right now I'm having a hell of a time getting the temp up.
Its only gone up to about 230 so far. Seems like I've added
about 3 chimmneys of lump. I do have the vent at 1/4 of the
way. Should I open it until the temp rises and then close back
down again? Just added some more lump on top so hopefully
that will help. Looks like I need to make a bigger fire and then
jsut keep maintainign with constant fuel addtions.

Jesse



  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 08:45:49 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:

>Jesse Skeens wrote:


>If you have the time and inclination you can add smaller loads more often
>too. This would be to keep the temps closer to the 240-250 region. Or mix
>and match, dont want to have to look for a bit, add a larger amount, got
>time, add smaller bits. Scientific eh? Most of this is with the intake open
>about 1" and the exhaust full open.
>
>Course, some days none of this works picture perfect for some damn reason.
>You got a flat'ish fireplace shovel to scrape out excess ash from under the
>firegrate? Shouldnt need it on a 5-6 hour cook, but shit happens.
>
>If you want a steadier lower temp it takes a smaller load of fuel and
>therefore more tending. But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
>beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what the
>doctor ordered. Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do honey-do's
>and whatnot. Poor bassards.
>
>Good luck, good eats.


Right now I'm having a hell of a time getting the temp up.
Its only gone up to about 230 so far. Seems like I've added
about 3 chimmneys of lump. I do have the vent at 1/4 of the
way. Should I open it until the temp rises and then close back
down again? Just added some more lump on top so hopefully
that will help. Looks like I need to make a bigger fire and then
jsut keep maintainign with constant fuel addtions.

Jesse

  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
BOB
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

frohe wrote:
> Duwop wrote:
>> But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
>> beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what
>> the doctor ordered.

>
> Most times Sunday is my cookin day & since I try to read a book a
> month this is a good time to sit out on the porch to sip a few and let
> my mind get into the book.
>
> Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do
>> honey-do's and whatnot. Poor bassards.

>
> Wash your mouth out!!! lol Just because we got a "set it and forget
> it" cooker don't mean we ain't skilled in the ways of avoidin work.


Shoot, I can use fire-tending to get outa work cooking on a Kamado. It's the
secrets and mystique of cooking with fire!

>
> Really tendin the fire today - got a brisket goin in the ol 55 gallon
> barrel and it's supposed to be over 100F outside. Oh well, more
> beer!


BOB
Inside, chillin' out with a few Guiness pints and playin' on the computer while
the K5 does all the work on the ribs.
>
> --
> -frohe Life is too short to be in a hurry




  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
BOB
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

frohe wrote:
> Duwop wrote:
>> But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
>> beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what
>> the doctor ordered.

>
> Most times Sunday is my cookin day & since I try to read a book a
> month this is a good time to sit out on the porch to sip a few and let
> my mind get into the book.
>
> Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do
>> honey-do's and whatnot. Poor bassards.

>
> Wash your mouth out!!! lol Just because we got a "set it and forget
> it" cooker don't mean we ain't skilled in the ways of avoidin work.


Shoot, I can use fire-tending to get outa work cooking on a Kamado. It's the
secrets and mystique of cooking with fire!

>
> Really tendin the fire today - got a brisket goin in the ol 55 gallon
> barrel and it's supposed to be over 100F outside. Oh well, more
> beer!


BOB
Inside, chillin' out with a few Guiness pints and playin' on the computer while
the K5 does all the work on the ribs.
>
> --
> -frohe Life is too short to be in a hurry




  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
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Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Jesse Skeens wrote:
> On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 08:45:49 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:
>
> Right now I'm having a hell of a time getting the temp up.
> Its only gone up to about 230 so far. Seems like I've added
> about 3 chimmneys of lump. I do have the vent at 1/4 of the
> way. Should I open it until the temp rises and then close back
> down again?


Sorry, yeah, get the thing started wide open before shutting down.

>Just added some more lump on top so hopefully
> that will help. Looks like I need to make a bigger fire and then
> jsut keep maintainign with constant fuel addtions.
>
> Jesse


Pretty much.


--



  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Jesse Skeens wrote:
> On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 08:45:49 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:
>
> Right now I'm having a hell of a time getting the temp up.
> Its only gone up to about 230 so far. Seems like I've added
> about 3 chimmneys of lump. I do have the vent at 1/4 of the
> way. Should I open it until the temp rises and then close back
> down again?


Sorry, yeah, get the thing started wide open before shutting down.

>Just added some more lump on top so hopefully
> that will help. Looks like I need to make a bigger fire and then
> jsut keep maintainign with constant fuel addtions.
>
> Jesse


Pretty much.


--





  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

frohe wrote:
>
> Really tendin the fire today - got a brisket goin in the ol 55 gallon
> barrel and it's supposed to be over 100F outside. Oh well, more
> beer!


I've been meanin to ask you Frohe; your barrell, you got any sort of baffle
or anything between the meat and the fire in that thing or you just keep a
small fire in that thing? You got a door in one side for fire tending?

TIA

D
--



  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

frohe wrote:
>
> Really tendin the fire today - got a brisket goin in the ol 55 gallon
> barrel and it's supposed to be over 100F outside. Oh well, more
> beer!


I've been meanin to ask you Frohe; your barrell, you got any sort of baffle
or anything between the meat and the fire in that thing or you just keep a
small fire in that thing? You got a door in one side for fire tending?

TIA

D
--



  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 17:01:30 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:

>Jesse Skeens wrote:
>> On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 08:45:49 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:
>>
>> Right now I'm having a hell of a time getting the temp up.
>> Its only gone up to about 230 so far. Seems like I've added
>> about 3 chimmneys of lump. I do have the vent at 1/4 of the
>> way. Should I open it until the temp rises and then close back
>> down again?

>
>Sorry, yeah, get the thing started wide open before shutting down.
>
>>Just added some more lump on top so hopefully
>> that will help. Looks like I need to make a bigger fire and then
>> jsut keep maintainign with constant fuel addtions.
>>
>> Jesse

>
>Pretty much.



Ok so the fire has stablized now and its a more comfortable
225-240. What is puzzling is that I have a lot less coals now
yet it seems to hold better. Looks like the key is to have some
bigger chunks of wood standing by. I dropped about a
5" x 4" chunk and that got the temp up. Before I was
adding chimney after chimnet of either lump or burned
wood and it was barely making a difference. Never got
the grade higher than 240-250 though. Big difference
compared to the WSM which will easily sky rocket
if you added a full chimney to it.

Took my chicken quarters off a little while ago and they
came out good. Ribs are almost done as well.

All inall I like cooking on this better than the WSM.
After the initial trial and error period I seem to have
it down now. And although its not as "set and forget"
as the WSM, putting a few chunks of fuel on every
so often isn't exactly "work".

Thanks for all the help.

Jesse
  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
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Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 17:01:30 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:

>Jesse Skeens wrote:
>> On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 08:45:49 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:
>>
>> Right now I'm having a hell of a time getting the temp up.
>> Its only gone up to about 230 so far. Seems like I've added
>> about 3 chimmneys of lump. I do have the vent at 1/4 of the
>> way. Should I open it until the temp rises and then close back
>> down again?

>
>Sorry, yeah, get the thing started wide open before shutting down.
>
>>Just added some more lump on top so hopefully
>> that will help. Looks like I need to make a bigger fire and then
>> jsut keep maintainign with constant fuel addtions.
>>
>> Jesse

>
>Pretty much.



Ok so the fire has stablized now and its a more comfortable
225-240. What is puzzling is that I have a lot less coals now
yet it seems to hold better. Looks like the key is to have some
bigger chunks of wood standing by. I dropped about a
5" x 4" chunk and that got the temp up. Before I was
adding chimney after chimnet of either lump or burned
wood and it was barely making a difference. Never got
the grade higher than 240-250 though. Big difference
compared to the WSM which will easily sky rocket
if you added a full chimney to it.

Took my chicken quarters off a little while ago and they
came out good. Ribs are almost done as well.

All inall I like cooking on this better than the WSM.
After the initial trial and error period I seem to have
it down now. And although its not as "set and forget"
as the WSM, putting a few chunks of fuel on every
so often isn't exactly "work".

Thanks for all the help.

Jesse
  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Sun, 01 Aug 2004 20:53:18 -0400, Jesse Skeens >
wrote:

>wood and it was barely making a difference. Never got
>the grade higher than 240-250 though. Big difference
>compared to the WSM which will easily sky rocket
>if you added a full chimney to it.



Correction just went out and it was up to 267.
Again there is much less coals now than earlier
when I was barely at 200. Ony difference
I can see is that all thse ones are white/red
where as before I had a lot of unburned lump
there (minion setup).

Looks like I got the small/hot fire now like
you're supposed to as before when I had a
large cool one (and more smoke).

Maybe it was having the side door only
open 1/4 way.

Jesse


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Sun, 01 Aug 2004 20:53:18 -0400, Jesse Skeens >
wrote:

>wood and it was barely making a difference. Never got
>the grade higher than 240-250 though. Big difference
>compared to the WSM which will easily sky rocket
>if you added a full chimney to it.



Correction just went out and it was up to 267.
Again there is much less coals now than earlier
when I was barely at 200. Ony difference
I can see is that all thse ones are white/red
where as before I had a lot of unburned lump
there (minion setup).

Looks like I got the small/hot fire now like
you're supposed to as before when I had a
large cool one (and more smoke).

Maybe it was having the side door only
open 1/4 way.

Jesse
  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mike Neel
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

> Looks like I got the small/hot fire now like
> you're supposed to as before when I had a
> large cool one (and more smoke).
>
> Maybe it was having the side door only
> open 1/4 way.


I cook with the vents all the way open, and keep a small hot fire going --
we're talking less than 8" around for the bed of coals and everything. I
seem to have more luck controlling things. Maybe it's just me, but it's
easier to eyeball how much wood to add than it is to adjust a vent while
adding wood.

Mike


  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Mike Neel
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

> Looks like I got the small/hot fire now like
> you're supposed to as before when I had a
> large cool one (and more smoke).
>
> Maybe it was having the side door only
> open 1/4 way.


I cook with the vents all the way open, and keep a small hot fire going --
we're talking less than 8" around for the bed of coals and everything. I
seem to have more luck controlling things. Maybe it's just me, but it's
easier to eyeball how much wood to add than it is to adjust a vent while
adding wood.

Mike


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 21:36:25 -0400, "Mike Neel" >
wrote:

>> Looks like I got the small/hot fire now like
>> you're supposed to as before when I had a
>> large cool one (and more smoke).
>>
>> Maybe it was having the side door only
>> open 1/4 way.

>
>I cook with the vents all the way open, and keep a small hot fire going --
>we're talking less than 8" around for the bed of coals and everything. I
>seem to have more luck controlling things. Maybe it's just me, but it's
>easier to eyeball how much wood to add than it is to adjust a vent while
>adding wood.
>
>Mike
>


Mike,

Once I got the fire hot it seemed to work ok to have
the vent mostly closed and at the same time add fuel.
I think my problem was keeping it fairly closed even
when the fire hadn't got hot enough yet.

Overall the cook went well. Just took the ribs off.
They could have been more tender but I dont think
they cooked long enough with the temp as low as it
was. There was a piece I trimmed that was next
to the opening to the firebox and that piece
came out perfect. The extra heat from where it
lay seemed to make the difference.

Jesse
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 21:36:25 -0400, "Mike Neel" >
wrote:

>> Looks like I got the small/hot fire now like
>> you're supposed to as before when I had a
>> large cool one (and more smoke).
>>
>> Maybe it was having the side door only
>> open 1/4 way.

>
>I cook with the vents all the way open, and keep a small hot fire going --
>we're talking less than 8" around for the bed of coals and everything. I
>seem to have more luck controlling things. Maybe it's just me, but it's
>easier to eyeball how much wood to add than it is to adjust a vent while
>adding wood.
>
>Mike
>


Mike,

Once I got the fire hot it seemed to work ok to have
the vent mostly closed and at the same time add fuel.
I think my problem was keeping it fairly closed even
when the fire hadn't got hot enough yet.

Overall the cook went well. Just took the ribs off.
They could have been more tender but I dont think
they cooked long enough with the temp as low as it
was. There was a piece I trimmed that was next
to the opening to the firebox and that piece
came out perfect. The extra heat from where it
lay seemed to make the difference.

Jesse


  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
M&M
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.


On 1-Aug-2004, Jesse Skeens > wrote:

> On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 08:45:49 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:
>
> >Jesse Skeens wrote:

>
> >If you have the time and inclination you can add smaller loads more often
> >too. This would be to keep the temps closer to the 240-250 region. Or mix
> >and match, dont want to have to look for a bit, add a larger amount, got
> >time, add smaller bits. Scientific eh? Most of this is with the intake open
> >about 1" and the exhaust full open.
> >
> >Course, some days none of this works picture perfect for some damn reason.
> >You got a flat'ish fireplace shovel to scrape out excess ash from under the
> >firegrate? Shouldnt need it on a 5-6 hour cook, but shit happens.
> >
> >If you want a steadier lower temp it takes a smaller load of fuel and
> >therefore more tending. But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
> >beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what the
> >doctor ordered. Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do honey-do's
> >and whatnot. Poor bassards.
> >
> >Good luck, good eats.

>
> Right now I'm having a hell of a time getting the temp up.
> Its only gone up to about 230 so far. Seems like I've added
> about 3 chimmneys of lump. I do have the vent at 1/4 of the
> way. Should I open it until the temp rises and then close back
> down again? Just added some more lump on top so hopefully
> that will help. Looks like I need to make a bigger fire and then
> jsut keep maintainign with constant fuel addtions.
>
> Jesse


Jesse, I've been cooking on an NBS for a couple of years now. It
drove me nuts at first. I made noises about like you're making for
a long time. Then I quite trying to maintain temp within ten degrees
or so. Life got easier by a bunch. Here's the formulae. Clean out
enough ash so you get some good draft. Load in about a chimney
and a half or two of cold lump. Dump a well lit chimney of lump
on top of that. Crack the firebox draft to 1". Not 1/2" or 1/4" or
2", but 1" precisely. "THEN" treat it like a sore dick. Don't F#$%
with it. Leave the chimney damper wide open. That cooker is
going to run about 250 to 275. (At the grate). When it drops to
220 add another chimney of lump. Don't mess with the draft.
Trying to make that muther run at 220 or so is going to drive
you to the nut house. Give it up. If you have to cook at 220 just
fire up your WSM. No problem. Oh yeh, once you get that fire
stabilized, just throw a good sized log on top for smoke. I use
a 2-1/2" to 3" by 10" log in mine. Works fine. Lasts a long time
and it don't flare up and mess with your heat range. Make sure
you have enough beer on hand. You should expect to tend the
fire about every 50 minutes or so. If you're out in the wind YMMV.
Mine's inside a screen room. There's some controversy about
proper cooking temperature. I'm not going to argue about it any
more. BTW my grate temp runs hotter then the dome temp by
25 to 35. Cooked a 13# brisket to pulling temp on Jun 8th. It
took 7 hours to reach 195 internal. I ain't gonna argue about
whether brisket should be pulled or not. I pulled mine and it
made damn fine sandwiches while it lasted.
--
M&M ("When You're Over The Hill You Pick Up Speed")


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  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
M&M
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.


On 1-Aug-2004, Jesse Skeens > wrote:

> On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 08:45:49 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:
>
> >Jesse Skeens wrote:

>
> >If you have the time and inclination you can add smaller loads more often
> >too. This would be to keep the temps closer to the 240-250 region. Or mix
> >and match, dont want to have to look for a bit, add a larger amount, got
> >time, add smaller bits. Scientific eh? Most of this is with the intake open
> >about 1" and the exhaust full open.
> >
> >Course, some days none of this works picture perfect for some damn reason.
> >You got a flat'ish fireplace shovel to scrape out excess ash from under the
> >firegrate? Shouldnt need it on a 5-6 hour cook, but shit happens.
> >
> >If you want a steadier lower temp it takes a smaller load of fuel and
> >therefore more tending. But sometimes just grabbing a book, sipping a
> >beverage on a Sunday while tending the perfect BBQ fire is just what the
> >doctor ordered. Those WSM folks miss out on this, having to do honey-do's
> >and whatnot. Poor bassards.
> >
> >Good luck, good eats.

>
> Right now I'm having a hell of a time getting the temp up.
> Its only gone up to about 230 so far. Seems like I've added
> about 3 chimmneys of lump. I do have the vent at 1/4 of the
> way. Should I open it until the temp rises and then close back
> down again? Just added some more lump on top so hopefully
> that will help. Looks like I need to make a bigger fire and then
> jsut keep maintainign with constant fuel addtions.
>
> Jesse


Jesse, I've been cooking on an NBS for a couple of years now. It
drove me nuts at first. I made noises about like you're making for
a long time. Then I quite trying to maintain temp within ten degrees
or so. Life got easier by a bunch. Here's the formulae. Clean out
enough ash so you get some good draft. Load in about a chimney
and a half or two of cold lump. Dump a well lit chimney of lump
on top of that. Crack the firebox draft to 1". Not 1/2" or 1/4" or
2", but 1" precisely. "THEN" treat it like a sore dick. Don't F#$%
with it. Leave the chimney damper wide open. That cooker is
going to run about 250 to 275. (At the grate). When it drops to
220 add another chimney of lump. Don't mess with the draft.
Trying to make that muther run at 220 or so is going to drive
you to the nut house. Give it up. If you have to cook at 220 just
fire up your WSM. No problem. Oh yeh, once you get that fire
stabilized, just throw a good sized log on top for smoke. I use
a 2-1/2" to 3" by 10" log in mine. Works fine. Lasts a long time
and it don't flare up and mess with your heat range. Make sure
you have enough beer on hand. You should expect to tend the
fire about every 50 minutes or so. If you're out in the wind YMMV.
Mine's inside a screen room. There's some controversy about
proper cooking temperature. I'm not going to argue about it any
more. BTW my grate temp runs hotter then the dome temp by
25 to 35. Cooked a 13# brisket to pulling temp on Jun 8th. It
took 7 hours to reach 195 internal. I ain't gonna argue about
whether brisket should be pulled or not. I pulled mine and it
made damn fine sandwiches while it lasted.
--
M&M ("When You're Over The Hill You Pick Up Speed")


-----= Posted via Newsfeeds.Com, Uncensored Usenet News =-----
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  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
frohe
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Duwop wrote:
> I've been meanin to ask you Frohe; your barrell, you got any sort of
> baffle or anything between the meat and the fire in that thing or

you
> just keep a small fire in that thing? You got a door in one side for
> fire tending?


It's ya standard 55 gallon drum. No baffle, just a big open area with
a cookin grate inside. There is a door on the side but it doesn't
close all the way so I use smallish fires to keep my temps in range.
It a far peice from being idealic but, hey, I grew up learnin how to
do Q in one of them things from my grandad and daddy. Other than
that, I get to smile a lot when folks first see it and ask "you cook
in that?" then later tell me it turns out some great Q.

Like we've all said many times around here - it's the cook and not the
cooker.
--
-frohe
Life is too short to be in a hurry


  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
frohe
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Jesse Skeens wrote:
> putting a few chunks of fuel on every
> so often isn't exactly "work".


Now ya got it, Jesse. We're all modern day neandrethals; we love to
mess with meat, heat and smoke.
--
-frohe
Life is too short to be in a hurry


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Mon, 2 Aug 2004 07:44:43 GMT, "M&M" >
wrote:


>enough ash so you get some good draft. Load in about a chimney
>and a half or two of cold lump. Dump a well lit chimney of lump
>on top of that. Crack the firebox draft to 1". Not 1/2" or 1/4" or
>2", but 1" precisely. "THEN" treat it like a sore dick. Don't F#$%
>with it. Leave the chimney damper wide open. That cooker is
>going to run about 250 to 275. (At the grate). When it drops to
>220 add another chimney of lump. Don't mess with the draft.
>Trying to make that muther run at 220 or so is going to drive
>you to the nut house. Give it up. If you have to cook at 220 just
>fire up your WSM. No problem. Oh yeh, once you get that fire
>stabilized, just throw a good sized log on top for smoke. I use



I'll give that a go next time. Any particular patter that the cold
lump needs to be in? I had a feeling that maybe putting the
hot lump on top ofcold would not allow proper air flow to it.
Would a "ring" of cold lump work better?

As far as 220 well thats right where mine was at but not where
I wanted it to be. Could never get it hotter than that except
briefly.

Thanks again,

Jesse


  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Mon, 2 Aug 2004 07:44:43 GMT, "M&M" >
wrote:


>enough ash so you get some good draft. Load in about a chimney
>and a half or two of cold lump. Dump a well lit chimney of lump
>on top of that. Crack the firebox draft to 1". Not 1/2" or 1/4" or
>2", but 1" precisely. "THEN" treat it like a sore dick. Don't F#$%
>with it. Leave the chimney damper wide open. That cooker is
>going to run about 250 to 275. (At the grate). When it drops to
>220 add another chimney of lump. Don't mess with the draft.
>Trying to make that muther run at 220 or so is going to drive
>you to the nut house. Give it up. If you have to cook at 220 just
>fire up your WSM. No problem. Oh yeh, once you get that fire
>stabilized, just throw a good sized log on top for smoke. I use



I'll give that a go next time. Any particular patter that the cold
lump needs to be in? I had a feeling that maybe putting the
hot lump on top ofcold would not allow proper air flow to it.
Would a "ring" of cold lump work better?

As far as 220 well thats right where mine was at but not where
I wanted it to be. Could never get it hotter than that except
briefly.

Thanks again,

Jesse
  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Jesse Skeens wrote:
>
>


If it wouldnt get hotter it sounds like poor air circulation? How raised are
the coals from the bottom of the firebox? Does that gap become full of ash
quickly? You might want to get a local metal shop to cut you a grate that
sits about an 1" higher than the existing one.
A tip I followed, and am glad I did, was to run the vents full open the
first year/summer. The idea is that would accelerate my understanding of
firetending in a offset. It worked, and the effort payed off.


--



  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Mon, 2 Aug 2004 08:41:22 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:

>Jesse Skeens wrote:
>>
>>

>
>If it wouldnt get hotter it sounds like poor air circulation? How raised are
>the coals from the bottom of the firebox? Does that gap become full of ash
>quickly? You might want to get a local metal shop to cut you a grate that
>sits about an 1" higher than the existing one.
>A tip I followed, and am glad I did, was to run the vents full open the
>first year/summer. The idea is that would accelerate my understanding of
>firetending in a offset. It worked, and the effort payed off.


I had plenty of airflow on the bottom after using M&M's sideways
firegrate trick. I remember you mentioning the vents full open
idea not too long ago. I think initially I will do that just to
get the temp up and then choke them down as per M&M's
suggestion a few posts up.

It seemed that the last two hours of the cook went much
better. Maybe it was the fact that it got dark out but the
coals seemed much hotter ie: glowing/white ash at that
point. I had much less coals as well yet my temp did get
up to where I wanted it to.

When I first started the fire I had lots of cold lump and
kept adding chimneys of preburned on top of that
yet it never seemed to get that white hot look to it.

I just wonder about adding hot lump on top of cold
as this seems like it would cause airflow problems so
thats why I mentioned maybe a ring would do. I should
probably head over to the VirtualWeber site and take
another look at their minion shape.

Jesse
  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jesse Skeens
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

On Mon, 2 Aug 2004 08:41:22 -0700, "Duwop" > wrote:

>Jesse Skeens wrote:
>>
>>

>
>If it wouldnt get hotter it sounds like poor air circulation? How raised are
>the coals from the bottom of the firebox? Does that gap become full of ash
>quickly? You might want to get a local metal shop to cut you a grate that
>sits about an 1" higher than the existing one.
>A tip I followed, and am glad I did, was to run the vents full open the
>first year/summer. The idea is that would accelerate my understanding of
>firetending in a offset. It worked, and the effort payed off.


I had plenty of airflow on the bottom after using M&M's sideways
firegrate trick. I remember you mentioning the vents full open
idea not too long ago. I think initially I will do that just to
get the temp up and then choke them down as per M&M's
suggestion a few posts up.

It seemed that the last two hours of the cook went much
better. Maybe it was the fact that it got dark out but the
coals seemed much hotter ie: glowing/white ash at that
point. I had much less coals as well yet my temp did get
up to where I wanted it to.

When I first started the fire I had lots of cold lump and
kept adding chimneys of preburned on top of that
yet it never seemed to get that white hot look to it.

I just wonder about adding hot lump on top of cold
as this seems like it would cause airflow problems so
thats why I mentioned maybe a ring would do. I should
probably head over to the VirtualWeber site and take
another look at their minion shape.

Jesse
  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dana Myers
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Duwop wrote:

> Jesse Skeens wrote:
>
>>

>
> If it wouldnt get hotter it sounds like poor air circulation? How raised are
> the coals from the bottom of the firebox? Does that gap become full of ash
> quickly? You might want to get a local metal shop to cut you a grate that
> sits about an 1" higher than the existing one.


My CBS (aka NBS) came with three charcoal grates so you
can run a fire in the firebox and in the cooking chamber
(for grilling).

So what I do in my NBS is take the charcoal grates put
two of them, rotated 90 degrees, in the firebox. This
raises the fire a couple of inches, which is extremely
useful. The 'stock' grate level is way too low.

> A tip I followed, and am glad I did, was to run the vents full open the
> first year/summer. The idea is that would accelerate my understanding of
> firetending in a offset. It worked, and the effort payed off.


I always run the chimney vent full open. Never close it,
except perhaps to strangle a fire after cooking if you want
to try to save some lump.

I run the firebox damper about 1/3 open, primarily to
reduce the disturbance caused by wind. I frankly
don't think it makes much difference in the cooking
heat if you're 1/3 open or full open, enough air flows
at 1/3 open that the charcoals get all they need.

I have the bigger Weber chimney and about 1 and half
loads of glowing charcoals will get me into 250F at the
grate no problem. I have extended the smoker chimney to
the cooking grate using a short length of flexible
aluminum ducting.

I do not use the firebox damper much, preferring to
control temperature through fire size. I've found that
it requires less tending that way. I mean, the charcoal
wants to burn and you have to let it, if you cut off the
air to the charcoal, you'll quickly slow the charcoal
down to where it doesn't want to burn. If you've got a
fire that's running at 270F and you try to damp it down
to 225F, you'll get a fire isn't burning right.

Don't try to regulate the temperature too precisely.
Swings 25F below and above your target temperature are
just fine in my experience. If my target is 250F,
I'll let the fire burn down to 225F, then add enough
lump to get the fire up to 270-275F, then let it burn down
to 225F and repeat the cycle. I think I add fuel about
once an hour or so on the average.

When you add fuel, give it a chance to come up to
temperature. With experience, you'll know pretty much
exactly how much to add (for me, it's two scoops with
the plastic scooper I use) and you can just add the
lump into top of the fire, close the lid on the firebox
and, about 15-20 minutes later, you'll see the temperature
peak around 275F and start down. If you want to get quicker
feedback, you can run a side-fire to get your lump burning
before adding it (I have a little weber-clone kettle that I
sometimes run a well-damped fire in for this purpose). If
you add already-buring lump, you'll see the grate temp peak
much sooner.

If your fire is too hot, you basically have too much fuel
in the fire box. Take some out into the side-fire.

For smoke, I usually use chunks of foil-wrapped wood,
use several layers of foil and poke maybe one or two
holes. If the wood gets too hot and the foil gives
way, the wood can catch on fire, and this is pretty
much the only time I use the firebox damper to knock
down the burning wood chunk... wait until the chimney
starts smoking again and re-open the damper. You can
tell when a wood chunk is burning when your grate temp
spikes up pretty suddenly.

Some of the lump, especially larger pieces, have
charcoalized bark on them. When it's burning, it
can give off a bit of a waxy odor. I haven't noticed
it showing up in the meat, but, if I have a side-fire
going, I'll put barky-lump in it to get it burning and
that usually drives off the waxy smell.

I've been able to run 225F at the grate no problem,
it means I let the fire burn down to 200F and run it
up to 250F after adding fuel. I prefer a side-fire
when running at lower temps.

At first, I was constantly messing with dampers and
adding fuel and getting major spikes. It was nerve-
wracking. It can make you crazy. Once I learned
the best control of temperature in my NBS was fire
size, and you just need to make sure to get enough
fresh air to the fire, it all got easier. One
adjustment an hour or even a little longer is about
all I do now.

Cheers and good eatin'

Dana


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
M&M
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.


On 2-Aug-2004, Jesse Skeens > wrote:

> On Mon, 2 Aug 2004 07:44:43 GMT, "M&M" >
> wrote:
>
>
> >enough ash so you get some good draft. Load in about a chimney
> >and a half or two of cold lump. Dump a well lit chimney of lump
> >on top of that. Crack the firebox draft to 1". Not 1/2" or 1/4" or
> >2", but 1" precisely. "THEN" treat it like a sore dick. Don't F#$%
> >with it. Leave the chimney damper wide open. That cooker is
> >going to run about 250 to 275. (At the grate). When it drops to
> >220 add another chimney of lump. Don't mess with the draft.
> >Trying to make that muther run at 220 or so is going to drive
> >you to the nut house. Give it up. If you have to cook at 220 just
> >fire up your WSM. No problem. Oh yeh, once you get that fire
> >stabilized, just throw a good sized log on top for smoke. I use

>
>
> I'll give that a go next time. Any particular patter that the cold
> lump needs to be in? I had a feeling that maybe putting the
> hot lump on top ofcold would not allow proper air flow to it.
> Would a "ring" of cold lump work better?
>
> As far as 220 well thats right where mine was at but not where
> I wanted it to be. Could never get it hotter than that except
> briefly.
>
> Thanks again,
>
> Jesse


I'm completely baffled by your problem getting it as hot as you'd like.
Mine will easily reach 400. My problem is keeping the
heat under 300. I don't bother with any pattern to the load of lump.
It may matter, but I don't mess with it. Actually, it sounds like your
problems are pretty minor.

--
M&M ("When You're Over The Hill You Pick Up Speed")


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  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

"M&M" >
> On 2-Aug-2004, Jesse Skeens > wrote:
>
> >
> > As far as 220 well thats right where mine was at but not where
> > I wanted it to be. Could never get it hotter than that except
> > briefly.
> >

> I'm completely baffled by your problem getting it as hot as you'd like.
> Mine will easily reach 400. My problem is keeping the
> heat under 300. I don't bother with any pattern to the load of lump.
> It may matter, but I don't mess with it. Actually, it sounds like your
> problems are pretty minor.
>


Mine doesnt like going over 300 much either any more. When I 1st got it had
a hard time getting it under 275, go figure. Seems these things must vary a
lot between designs and age and whatnot.

As far as I can tell, minion method is for vert smokers with the round tray,
but I've had luck with putting new coal partly on an existing coal bed,
leaving the rest of the pile to light from the new stuff being lit.
It's all common sense, you'll get the hang of it pretty quick.


  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
Duwop
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

"M&M" >
> On 2-Aug-2004, Jesse Skeens > wrote:
>
> >
> > As far as 220 well thats right where mine was at but not where
> > I wanted it to be. Could never get it hotter than that except
> > briefly.
> >

> I'm completely baffled by your problem getting it as hot as you'd like.
> Mine will easily reach 400. My problem is keeping the
> heat under 300. I don't bother with any pattern to the load of lump.
> It may matter, but I don't mess with it. Actually, it sounds like your
> problems are pretty minor.
>


Mine doesnt like going over 300 much either any more. When I 1st got it had
a hard time getting it under 275, go figure. Seems these things must vary a
lot between designs and age and whatnot.

As far as I can tell, minion method is for vert smokers with the round tray,
but I've had luck with putting new coal partly on an existing coal bed,
leaving the rest of the pile to light from the new stuff being lit.
It's all common sense, you'll get the hang of it pretty quick.


  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dana Myers
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

M&M wrote:

> I'm completely baffled by your problem getting it as hot as you'd like.
> Mine will easily reach 400.


Same here. More fuel == more heat, as long as the fire
can breathe OK and isn't damped down and smoldering.

> My problem is keeping the heat under 300.


Less fuel == less heat ;-) Once I learned to be
less enthusiastic adding lump to a waning fire,
225-ish cooks aren't a problem (of course, I'm
willing to cycle up to 250 and down to 200).

> I don't bother with any pattern to the load of lump.


I make a pile ;-)

> It may matter, but I don't mess with it. Actually, it sounds like your
> problems are pretty minor.


Sounds like Jesse is closer to "tune-up" mode than "getting a
clue" mode to me ;-)

Dana
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dana Myers
 
Posts: n/a
Default NBS/Char Broil Silver fire control question.

Duwop wrote:


> As far as I can tell, minion method is for vert smokers with the round tray,
> but I've had luck with putting new coal partly on an existing coal bed,
> leaving the rest of the pile to light from the new stuff being lit.


The one thing I'd suggest to someone new at it, at the risk of
observing the obvious, is to be very patient in watching the
grate temperature after cold lump to the fire. It'll take
20 or 30 minutes for the new fuel to get going and the fire to
come up to temperature. It's easier on the nerves to add too
little than to add too much.

> It's all common sense, you'll get the hang of it pretty quick.


Yup.

Cheers,
Dana
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