Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 25-07-2004, 12:33 AM
Dave Bugg
 
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Default Brining Pork Butt

Mark Reichert wrote:

Seems to be a case of upping the moisture content to make sure the all
too lean modern pork is still moist at the end, as well as getting
some seasoning into the interior cells of the meat.


That's Alton's reasoning, but the reality for shoulders, picnics and butts
is that they are usually not that lean. Unless, of course, you have a
maniacally enthusiastic butcher that hates fat. It's just not necessary to
brine.



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Old 25-07-2004, 12:37 AM
Jack Curry
 
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Default Brining Pork Butt

"Dave Bugg" deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote in message
...
Mark Reichert wrote:

Seems to be a case of upping the moisture content to make sure the all
too lean modern pork is still moist at the end, as well as getting
some seasoning into the interior cells of the meat.


That's Alton's reasoning, but the reality for shoulders, picnics and butts
is that they are usually not that lean. Unless, of course, you have a
maniacally enthusiastic butcher that hates fat. It's just not necessary to
brine.

Ditto to Dave. I've never had a butt turn out dry. There's plenty of fat
in a Boston butt to keep the meat moist without brining.

Jack Curry


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Old 25-07-2004, 09:43 AM
Bob
 
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Default Brining Pork Butt


"Mark Reichert" wrote
There was an argument on why Alton Brown would advise brining a pork
butt before smoking. Well for his actual words, there's a link to the
transcript he

Seems to be a case of upping the moisture content to make sure the all
too lean modern pork is still moist at the end, as well as getting
some seasoning into the interior cells of the meat.


You can achieve the same thing by injecting apple juice with your favorite
spices mixed in.


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Old 25-07-2004, 09:43 AM
Bob
 
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Default Brining Pork Butt


"Mark Reichert" wrote
There was an argument on why Alton Brown would advise brining a pork
butt before smoking. Well for his actual words, there's a link to the
transcript he

Seems to be a case of upping the moisture content to make sure the all
too lean modern pork is still moist at the end, as well as getting
some seasoning into the interior cells of the meat.


You can achieve the same thing by injecting apple juice with your favorite
spices mixed in.


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Old 25-07-2004, 08:16 PM
Tyler Hopper
 
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Default Brining Pork Butt


"Dave Bugg" deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote in message
...
Mark Reichert wrote:

Seems to be a case of upping the moisture content to make sure the all
too lean modern pork is still moist at the end, as well as getting
some seasoning into the interior cells of the meat.


That's Alton's reasoning, but the reality for shoulders, picnics and butts
is that they are usually not that lean. Unless, of course, you have a
maniacally enthusiastic butcher that hates fat. It's just not necessary to
brine.


Then don't buy the boneless butts from Costco. Not only do they remove the bone.
Most of the intra-muscular fat is gone too. My last batch turned out so dry I
had to moisten it up with some broth and rub.


Tyler




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Old 25-07-2004, 08:16 PM
Tyler Hopper
 
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Default Brining Pork Butt


"Dave Bugg" deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote in message
...
Mark Reichert wrote:

Seems to be a case of upping the moisture content to make sure the all
too lean modern pork is still moist at the end, as well as getting
some seasoning into the interior cells of the meat.


That's Alton's reasoning, but the reality for shoulders, picnics and butts
is that they are usually not that lean. Unless, of course, you have a
maniacally enthusiastic butcher that hates fat. It's just not necessary to
brine.


Then don't buy the boneless butts from Costco. Not only do they remove the bone.
Most of the intra-muscular fat is gone too. My last batch turned out so dry I
had to moisten it up with some broth and rub.


Tyler


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Old 25-07-2004, 11:55 PM
cory
 
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Default Brining Pork Butt

Jack Curry wrote:

"Dave Bugg" deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote in message
...

Mark Reichert wrote:


Seems to be a case of upping the moisture content to make sure the all
too lean modern pork is still moist at the end, as well as getting
some seasoning into the interior cells of the meat.


That's Alton's reasoning, but the reality for shoulders, picnics and butts
is that they are usually not that lean. Unless, of course, you have a
maniacally enthusiastic butcher that hates fat. It's just not necessary to
brine.


Ditto to Dave. I've never had a butt turn out dry. There's plenty of fat
in a Boston butt to keep the meat moist without brining.

Jack Curry


I suspect the main benefit of brining the butt is delivering salt to the
meat, which of course could be accomplished by ... salting the meat.
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Old 25-07-2004, 11:55 PM
cory
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brining Pork Butt

Jack Curry wrote:

"Dave Bugg" deebuggatcharterdotnet wrote in message
...

Mark Reichert wrote:


Seems to be a case of upping the moisture content to make sure the all
too lean modern pork is still moist at the end, as well as getting
some seasoning into the interior cells of the meat.


That's Alton's reasoning, but the reality for shoulders, picnics and butts
is that they are usually not that lean. Unless, of course, you have a
maniacally enthusiastic butcher that hates fat. It's just not necessary to
brine.


Ditto to Dave. I've never had a butt turn out dry. There's plenty of fat
in a Boston butt to keep the meat moist without brining.

Jack Curry


I suspect the main benefit of brining the butt is delivering salt to the
meat, which of course could be accomplished by ... salting the meat.
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Old 26-07-2004, 06:30 PM
Woogeroo
 
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Default Brining Pork Butt


I'm guessing one would use a syringe of some type for injecting... but
I'm not sure. Could you enlighten me on the tools and methods for
trying this? or send me along to a webpage that has some information
already on it?

It reads yummy.

-W


You can achieve the same thing by injecting apple juice with your favorite
spices mixed in.



-Woogeroo

------------------------------------------------
- remove NOBS to send email.
------------------------------------------------

Woogeroo's Simple Smoking Page:

http://woogeroo.home.mindspring.com/wsp/

smokin' along with an old style Big Green Egg...
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 26-07-2004, 06:30 PM
Woogeroo
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brining Pork Butt


I'm guessing one would use a syringe of some type for injecting... but
I'm not sure. Could you enlighten me on the tools and methods for
trying this? or send me along to a webpage that has some information
already on it?

It reads yummy.

-W


You can achieve the same thing by injecting apple juice with your favorite
spices mixed in.



-Woogeroo

------------------------------------------------
- remove NOBS to send email.
------------------------------------------------

Woogeroo's Simple Smoking Page:

http://woogeroo.home.mindspring.com/wsp/

smokin' along with an old style Big Green Egg...


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