Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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  #1 (permalink)   Report Post  
Maltby
 
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Default Brisket Methods

Gentlemen:

This is Thurs evening ( 4/20/04).

Early Sat ( 5/1/04) morning, about 3-4 AM, I will light off the fire in my
Hondo New Braunfels's (having
installed all the web site mods I could find

What's happening - I'm cooking a 10 lb full cut brisket and two 5 lb flats.
Dry rubs on all. Since I haven't cooked a large piece of beef like the full
cut before, I'm concerned I may run out of time, (or fuel) until it's
finished.

As any of you with this kind of smoker know, it is reallly fussy temp and
fuel wise.

I'm going to attempt to keep this whole thing at 250 or so and add 1 large
chunk of hickory every 1/2 hour four the first 4 hours.

I'm using about 50/50 lump charcoal and briquettes.

OK - the questions are -

1 Should I leave all the beef in for the same length of time or take the
flats out first?
2 I am considering removing the small point from the large cut after it is
done, and then re-cooking it a few hours at a later date for a "burnt ends"
result.
3 Is mopping a worthwhile effort considering the length of time ( 12 hrs
plus )?
4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours, wrapping it in
aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is also
preferable.
5 Any oppionions???

Bill


  #2 (permalink)   Report Post  
Steve Wertz
 
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On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 02:02:27 GMT, "Maltby" >
wrote:

>Gentlemen:
>
>This is Thurs evening ( 4/20/04).


No such day/date.

>I'm using about 50/50 lump charcoal and briquettes.


I hope you dont' plan on adding fresh briquettes to an already
stoked fire with meat in there...

You can do that with lump, but briquettes need to burn off those
chemicals before you can put food in there.

-sw
  #3 (permalink)   Report Post  
TFM®
 
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Default Brisket Methods

Steve Wertz wrote:
> On Fri, 30 Apr 2004 02:02:27 GMT, "Maltby" >
> wrote:
>
>> Gentlemen:
>>
>> This is Thurs evening ( 4/20/04).

>
> No such day/date.
>
>> I'm using about 50/50 lump charcoal and briquettes.

>
> I hope you dont' plan on adding fresh briquettes to an already
> stoked fire with meat in there...
>
> You can do that with lump, but briquettes need to burn off those
> chemicals before you can put food in there.
>
> -sw



Briquettes need to be tossed in the trash or the fireplace. They're not
intended for use in cooking food.

TFM®


  #4 (permalink)   Report Post  
Nathan Lau
 
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Maltby wrote:
> 1 Should I leave all the beef in for the same length of time or take the
> flats out first?


I imagine the flats will reach temp faster than the full cut. Are you
using a probe thermometer?

> 2 I am considering removing the small point from the large cut after it is
> done, and then re-cooking it a few hours at a later date for a "burnt ends"
> result.


Good idea.

> 3 Is mopping a worthwhile effort considering the length of time ( 12 hrs
> plus )?


For the full cut, I'd let it be. Do the flats have some kind of fat cap
on them?

> 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours, wrapping it in
> aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is also
> preferable.


Sure, if you like steamed meat.

> 5 Any oppionions???


Use a spellchecker ;-)

--
Aloha,

Nathan Lau
San Jose, CA

#include <std.disclaimer>
  #5 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bubba Unix Dude
 
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> > 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours, wrapping it in
> > aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is also
> > preferable.

>
> Sure, if you like steamed meat.
>


Nathan,

That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times that I have
done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in some areas.
What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?

Scott




  #6 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Bugg
 
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Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times that
> I have done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in
> some areas. What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?


Scott, tell us about the type of brisket cut, weight and how you 'Q'd it, so
that we can get a better idea of how to answer.
Dave


  #7 (permalink)   Report Post  
Jack Curry
 
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Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
>>> 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours, wrapping
>>> it in aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is
>>> also preferable.

>>
>> Sure, if you like steamed meat.
>>

>
> Nathan,
>
> That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times that
> I have done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in
> some areas. What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?
>
> Scott


Dry brisket results from overcooking. Do not cook brisket by time or
temperature, it's done when it passes the fork test.

Jack Curry


  #8 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bubba Unix Dude
 
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Default Brisket Methods


"Dave Bugg" <deebuggatcharterdotnet> wrote in message
...
> Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> > That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times that
> > I have done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in
> > some areas. What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?

>
> Scott, tell us about the type of brisket cut, weight and how you 'Q'd it,

so
> that we can get a better idea of how to answer.
> Dave
>
>


It was a full brisket, about 10-12 lbs in size, packer cut (the point and
flat together). The last time I did brisket was on my new WSM at about 225
to 250 degrees for several hours. Took it off once it reached 190 degrees
internally.

Hope that info helps.

Scott


  #9 (permalink)   Report Post  
Monroe, of course...
 
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In article > , "Jack
Curry" <Jack-Curry deletethis @cfl.rr.com> wrote:

> Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> >>> 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours, wrapping
> >>> it in aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is
> >>> also preferable.
> >>
> >> Sure, if you like steamed meat.
> >>

> >
> > Nathan,
> >
> > That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times that
> > I have done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in
> > some areas. What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?
> >
> > Scott

>
> Dry brisket results from overcooking. Do not cook brisket by time or
> temperature, it's done when it passes the fork test.
>

I've yet to have a dry brisket come off my K since I've started
cooking 'em fat side down. Jack is absolutely right, however- some
briskets are done at 190, others are already toast at 190.
A 5 degree difference in internal temp can mean the diff betwixt juicy
and shoeleather.

monroe(after 180 start checking)
  #10 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Bugg
 
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Bubba Unix Dude wrote:

> Took it off once it
> reached 190 degrees internally.


Where was the temp. measured, in the flat or point?
Dave




  #11 (permalink)   Report Post  
TFM®
 
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Default Brisket Methods

Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
>>> 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours, wrapping it in
>>> aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is also
>>> preferable.

>>
>> Sure, if you like steamed meat.
>>

>
> Nathan,
>
> That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times that I

have
> done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in some areas.
> What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?
>
> Scott



#1, do *not* trim any fat prior to cooking.

#2, Cook hotter than 220. Go for 300 on brisket.

#3, Toss the thermometer. Use the fork.

#4, Use the fork Luke!

TFM®


  #12 (permalink)   Report Post  
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> "Dave Bugg" <deebuggatcharterdotnet> wrote in message
> ...
>> Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
>>> That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times that
>>> I have done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in
>>> some areas. What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?

>>
>> Scott, tell us about the type of brisket cut, weight and how you 'Q'd it,

so
>> that we can get a better idea of how to answer.
>> Dave
>>
>>

>
> It was a full brisket, about 10-12 lbs in size, packer cut (the point and
> flat together). The last time I did brisket was on my new WSM at about 225
> to 250 degrees for several hours. Took it off once it reached 190 degrees
> internally.
>
> Hope that info helps.



It helps immensely. You cooked it at too low a temp and you went for a
certain temp instead of just taking it off when it was done.

Sorry, but there's no other answer for you. Brisket does not cook by the
book as pig parts do.
2 identical (in appearance) briskets may be hours apart even on the same
cooker.

Use the Fork!


TFM®
>
> Scott



  #13 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bubba Unix Dude
 
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"TFM®" > wrote in message
om...
> Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> >>> 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours, wrapping it

in
> >>> aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is also
> >>> preferable.
> >>
> >> Sure, if you like steamed meat.
> >>

> >
> > Nathan,
> >
> > That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times that I

> have
> > done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in some areas.
> > What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?
> >
> > Scott

>
>
> #1, do *not* trim any fat prior to cooking.
>
> #2, Cook hotter than 220. Go for 300 on brisket.
>
> #3, Toss the thermometer. Use the fork.
>
> #4, Use the fork Luke!
>
> TFM®
>
>


300 degrees for brisket? Please forgive me for my apparent ignorance, but
doesn't that seem to be a little high for slow cooking and bbq in general? I
thought the philosophy is to go low and slow which translates to about 225
to 250 degrees. This allows time for the breakdown of collagen connective
tissues. I would figure having the heat at 300 degrees would get away from
the collagen break down process for brisket.

Please correct me if I wrong...

Thanks,

Scott


  #14 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bubba Unix Dude
 
Posts: n/a
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"Dave Bugg" <deebuggatcharterdotnet> wrote in message
...
> Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
>
> > Took it off once it
> > reached 190 degrees internally.

>
> Where was the temp. measured, in the flat or point?
> Dave
>
>


Dave,

Good and obvious question.

I forget exactly, but it was definitely one over the other, which will make
a difference.

when cooking a full brisket (flat and point together), it seems that at some
point it would make sense to cut the two parts in half due to different
thickness between the two and therefore different finishing times.

Any thoughts on this?

Scott


  #15 (permalink)   Report Post  
Big Jim
 
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"Bubba Unix Dude" > wrote in message
...
>
> "TFM®" > wrote in message
> om...
> > Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> > >>> 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours, wrapping it

> in
> > >>> aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is also
> > >>> preferable.
> > >>
> > >> Sure, if you like steamed meat.
> > >>
> > >
> > > Nathan,
> > >
> > > That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times that

I
> > have
> > > done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in some

areas.
> > > What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?
> > >
> > > Scott

> >
> >
> > #1, do *not* trim any fat prior to cooking.
> >
> > #2, Cook hotter than 220. Go for 300 on brisket.
> >
> > #3, Toss the thermometer. Use the fork.
> >
> > #4, Use the fork Luke!
> >
> > TFM®
> >
> >

>
> 300 degrees for brisket? Please forgive me for my apparent ignorance, but
> doesn't that seem to be a little high for slow cooking and bbq in general?

I
> thought the philosophy is to go low and slow which translates to about 225
> to 250 degrees. This allows time for the breakdown of collagen connective
> tissues. I would figure having the heat at 300 degrees would get away from
> the collagen break down process for brisket.
>
> Please correct me if I wrong...
>
> Thanks,
>
> Scott
>
>

You ain't entirely wrong, but you ain't entirely right either. There are as
many ways to cook a brisket as there are briskets or cooks. I cook butts,
briskets, ribs and chicken every day (well almost) and run my pits above
300° as high as 400° a lot of times. It is justa matter of preference.
There are folks that will say there is only one way cook BBQ. Low and
Slow. Well son it ain't so. What I am saying is you don't have to start
yesterday or the day before to eat smoke cooked meat today.
--
Big Jim

www.lazyq.com




  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Bugg
 
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Default Brisket Methods

Bubba Unix Dude wrote:

> Good and obvious question.
>
> I forget exactly, but it was definitely one over the other, which
> will make a difference.
>
> when cooking a full brisket (flat and point together), it seems that
> at some point it would make sense to cut the two parts in half due to
> different thickness between the two and therefore different finishing
> times.
>
> Any thoughts on this?


The temp, IMHO, is best measured in the flat.


  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Big Jim
 
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"Bubba Unix Dude" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Dave Bugg" <deebuggatcharterdotnet> wrote in message
> ...
> > Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> >
> > > Took it off once it
> > > reached 190 degrees internally.

> >
> > Where was the temp. measured, in the flat or point?
> > Dave
> >
> >

>
> Dave,
>
> Good and obvious question.
>
> I forget exactly, but it was definitely one over the other, which will

make
> a difference.
>
> when cooking a full brisket (flat and point together), it seems that at

some
> point it would make sense to cut the two parts in half due to different
> thickness between the two and therefore different finishing times.
>
> Any thoughts on this?
>
> Scott
>
>

I got thoughts on it, but you probably don't want to hear them. Leave it in
ONE piece, Put salt and pepper on it or nothing at all. Cook it till the
long slender 2 tine fork will easily turn when stuck in the flat. Cook
between 275° and 350°. I just like the higher temps.
If you don't have the proper fork. Stick your temp probe in the flat. When
it hit's 190+° pull it. Let it sit a bit before you slice it.
You can separate it after it is done. Hint. The point is by far the best
part of a brisket.
--
Big Jim

www.lazyq.com


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bubba Unix Dude
 
Posts: n/a
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"Big Jim" > wrote in message
news
>
> "Bubba Unix Dude" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "TFM®" > wrote in message
> > om...
> > > Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> > > >>> 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours, wrapping

it
> > in
> > > >>> aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is also
> > > >>> preferable.
> > > >>
> > > >> Sure, if you like steamed meat.
> > > >>
> > > >
> > > > Nathan,
> > > >
> > > > That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times

that
> I
> > > have
> > > > done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in some

> areas.
> > > > What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?
> > > >
> > > > Scott
> > >
> > >
> > > #1, do *not* trim any fat prior to cooking.
> > >
> > > #2, Cook hotter than 220. Go for 300 on brisket.
> > >
> > > #3, Toss the thermometer. Use the fork.
> > >
> > > #4, Use the fork Luke!
> > >
> > > TFM®
> > >
> > >

> >
> > 300 degrees for brisket? Please forgive me for my apparent ignorance,

but
> > doesn't that seem to be a little high for slow cooking and bbq in

general?
> I
> > thought the philosophy is to go low and slow which translates to about

225
> > to 250 degrees. This allows time for the breakdown of collagen

connective
> > tissues. I would figure having the heat at 300 degrees would get away

from
> > the collagen break down process for brisket.
> >
> > Please correct me if I wrong...
> >
> > Thanks,
> >
> > Scott
> >
> >

> You ain't entirely wrong, but you ain't entirely right either. There are

as
> many ways to cook a brisket as there are briskets or cooks. I cook butts,
> briskets, ribs and chicken every day (well almost) and run my pits above
> 300° as high as 400° a lot of times. It is justa matter of preference.
> There are folks that will say there is only one way cook BBQ. Low and
> Slow. Well son it ain't so. What I am saying is you don't have to start
> yesterday or the day before to eat smoke cooked meat today.
> --
> Big Jim
>
>
www.lazyq.com
>
>


Big Jim,

Thanks for your comments. Interesting. So, when you run your pit between 300
and 400 degrees, does the tough traditional BBQ cuts come out tender just
like they would when someone goes low and slow?

Scott


  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Bugg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

Bubba Unix Dude wrote:

> Big Jim,
>
> Thanks for your comments. Interesting. So, when you run your pit
> between 300 and 400 degrees, does the tough traditional BBQ cuts come
> out tender just like they would when someone goes low and slow?


Scott, as someone who has had the pleasure of filling up on Big Jim's 'Q on
a couple of occasions, I can tell you that he and Danny Gaulden make some of
the best brisket that has ever melted in your mouth. <dang, now I'm drooling
and my stomach is rumblin'>
Dave


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bubba Unix Dude
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods


"Dave Bugg" <deebuggatcharterdotnet> wrote in message
...
> Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
>
> > Big Jim,
> >
> > Thanks for your comments. Interesting. So, when you run your pit
> > between 300 and 400 degrees, does the tough traditional BBQ cuts come
> > out tender just like they would when someone goes low and slow?

>
> Scott, as someone who has had the pleasure of filling up on Big Jim's 'Q

on
> a couple of occasions, I can tell you that he and Danny Gaulden make some

of
> the best brisket that has ever melted in your mouth. <dang, now I'm

drooling
> and my stomach is rumblin'>
> Dave
>
>


So would it be safe to say that the old expression "There is more than one
way to skin a cat" applies here?

Scott




  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Big Jim
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods


"Bubba Unix Dude" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Dave Bugg" <deebuggatcharterdotnet> wrote in message
> ...
> > Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> >
> > > Big Jim,
> > >
> > > Thanks for your comments. Interesting. So, when you run your pit
> > > between 300 and 400 degrees, does the tough traditional BBQ cuts come
> > > out tender just like they would when someone goes low and slow?

> >
> > Scott, as someone who has had the pleasure of filling up on Big Jim's 'Q

> on
> > a couple of occasions, I can tell you that he and Danny Gaulden make

some
> of
> > the best brisket that has ever melted in your mouth. <dang, now I'm

> drooling
> > and my stomach is rumblin'>
> > Dave
> >
> >

>
> So would it be safe to say that the old expression "There is more than one
> way to skin a cat" applies here?
>
> Scott
>
>

YES
--
Big Jim

www.lazyq.com


  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Big Jim
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods


"Bubba Unix Dude" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Big Jim" > wrote in message
> news
> >
> > "Bubba Unix Dude" > wrote in message
> > ...
> > >
> > > "TFM®" > wrote in message
> > > om...
> > > > Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> > > > >>> 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours,

wrapping
> it
> > > in
> > > > >>> aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is

also
> > > > >>> preferable.
> > > > >>
> > > > >> Sure, if you like steamed meat.
> > > > >>
> > > > >
> > > > > Nathan,
> > > > >
> > > > > That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times

> that
> > I
> > > > have
> > > > > done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in some

> > areas.
> > > > > What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?
> > > > >
> > > > > Scott
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > #1, do *not* trim any fat prior to cooking.
> > > >
> > > > #2, Cook hotter than 220. Go for 300 on brisket.
> > > >
> > > > #3, Toss the thermometer. Use the fork.
> > > >
> > > > #4, Use the fork Luke!
> > > >
> > > > TFM®
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > > 300 degrees for brisket? Please forgive me for my apparent ignorance,

> but
> > > doesn't that seem to be a little high for slow cooking and bbq in

> general?
> > I
> > > thought the philosophy is to go low and slow which translates to about

> 225
> > > to 250 degrees. This allows time for the breakdown of collagen

> connective
> > > tissues. I would figure having the heat at 300 degrees would get away

> from
> > > the collagen break down process for brisket.
> > >
> > > Please correct me if I wrong...
> > >
> > > Thanks,
> > >
> > > Scott
> > >
> > >

> > You ain't entirely wrong, but you ain't entirely right either. There are

> as
> > many ways to cook a brisket as there are briskets or cooks. I cook

butts,
> > briskets, ribs and chicken every day (well almost) and run my pits above
> > 300° as high as 400° a lot of times. It is justa matter of preference.
> > There are folks that will say there is only one way cook BBQ. Low and
> > Slow. Well son it ain't so. What I am saying is you don't have to start
> > yesterday or the day before to eat smoke cooked meat today.
> > --
> > Big Jim
> >
> >
www.lazyq.com
> >
> >

>
> Big Jim,
>
> Thanks for your comments. Interesting. So, when you run your pit between

300
> and 400 degrees, does the tough traditional BBQ cuts come out tender just
> like they would when someone goes low and slow?
>
> Scott
>
>

YES
--
Big Jim

www.lazyq.com
--
Big Jim

www.lazyq.com


  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bubba Unix Dude
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods


"Big Jim" > wrote in message
...
>
> "Bubba Unix Dude" > wrote in message
> ...
> >
> > "Big Jim" > wrote in message
> > news
> > >
> > > "Bubba Unix Dude" > wrote in message
> > > ...
> > > >
> > > > "TFM®" > wrote in message
> > > > om...
> > > > > Bubba Unix Dude wrote:
> > > > > >>> 4 I've heard that removing the brisket after four hours,

> wrapping
> > it
> > > > in
> > > > > >>> aluminum foil, and the cooking in the oven for more time is

> also
> > > > > >>> preferable.
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >> Sure, if you like steamed meat.
> > > > > >>
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Nathan,
> > > > > >
> > > > > > That brings up a good question that I have myself. The two times

> > that
> > > I
> > > > > have
> > > > > > done brisket, it was pretty good overall. But, it was dry in

some
> > > areas.
> > > > > > What do you recommend for avoiding dry brisket?
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Scott
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > #1, do *not* trim any fat prior to cooking.
> > > > >
> > > > > #2, Cook hotter than 220. Go for 300 on brisket.
> > > > >
> > > > > #3, Toss the thermometer. Use the fork.
> > > > >
> > > > > #4, Use the fork Luke!
> > > > >
> > > > > TFM®
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > 300 degrees for brisket? Please forgive me for my apparent

ignorance,
> > but
> > > > doesn't that seem to be a little high for slow cooking and bbq in

> > general?
> > > I
> > > > thought the philosophy is to go low and slow which translates to

about
> > 225
> > > > to 250 degrees. This allows time for the breakdown of collagen

> > connective
> > > > tissues. I would figure having the heat at 300 degrees would get

away
> > from
> > > > the collagen break down process for brisket.
> > > >
> > > > Please correct me if I wrong...
> > > >
> > > > Thanks,
> > > >
> > > > Scott
> > > >
> > > >
> > > You ain't entirely wrong, but you ain't entirely right either. There

are
> > as
> > > many ways to cook a brisket as there are briskets or cooks. I cook

> butts,
> > > briskets, ribs and chicken every day (well almost) and run my pits

above
> > > 300° as high as 400° a lot of times. It is justa matter of preference.
> > > There are folks that will say there is only one way cook BBQ. Low

and
> > > Slow. Well son it ain't so. What I am saying is you don't have to

start
> > > yesterday or the day before to eat smoke cooked meat today.
> > > --
> > > Big Jim
> > >
> > >
www.lazyq.com
> > >
> > >

> >
> > Big Jim,
> >
> > Thanks for your comments. Interesting. So, when you run your pit between

> 300
> > and 400 degrees, does the tough traditional BBQ cuts come out tender

just
> > like they would when someone goes low and slow?
> >
> > Scott
> >
> >

> YES
> --
> Big Jim
>
>
www.lazyq.com
> --
> Big Jim
>
>
www.lazyq.com
>
>


Big Jim,

How long does a 10-12 lb brisket usually take at 300-400 degrees to cook?

Scott


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods


>Big Jim,
>
>How long does a 10-12 lb brisket usually take at 300-400 degrees to cook?
>
>Scott
>


I'm not Big Jim but I can imagine his answer would be "until you can
turn a two prong fork in the flat easily". VBG

Jay
  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Big Jim
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

> wrote in message
...
>
> >Big Jim,
> >
> >How long does a 10-12 lb brisket usually take at 300-400 degrees to cook?
> >
> >Scott
> >

>
> I'm not Big Jim but I can imagine his answer would be "until you can
> turn a two prong fork in the flat easily". VBG
>
> Jay

Jay got it right.
It takes 6-7 hours when cooking between 375° and 400°
--
Big Jim

www.lazyq.com




  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Big Jim
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods



"Bubbabob" > wrote in message
s.com...
> "Big Jim" > wrote:
>
> > wrote in message
> > ...
> >>
> >> >Big Jim,
> >> >
> >> >How long does a 10-12 lb brisket usually take at 300-400 degrees to
> >> >cook?
> >> >
> >> >Scott
> >> >
> >>
> >> I'm not Big Jim but I can imagine his answer would be "until you can
> >> turn a two prong fork in the flat easily". VBG
> >>
> >> Jay

> > Jay got it right.
> > It takes 6-7 hours when cooking between 375° and 400°

>
>
> But why would anyone try to cook a brisket at those absurd temps? Leather
> manufac


If you ever tried to cook one at those ABSURD temps you would know.
Sometimes you don't have time to do it the slow way.
BTW what qualifies you to make the ABSURD atatment? Tell us how you cook
briskets.
There are plenty of people on the NG that have eaten my briskets. Ask
them.
Appearently you have some experience in leather making.
--
Big Jim

www.lazyq.comturing?


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Bugg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

Bubbabob wrote:

> But why would anyone try to cook a brisket at those absurd temps?
> Leather manufacturing?


The only thing I will say in reply, is that it works. Big Jim has proven it
many times over. It seems contrary to what you would normally consider for
temp., but Jim does it all the time.
Dave


  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

Bubbabob wrote:
> "Big Jim" > wrote:
>
>> > wrote in message
>> ...
>>>
>>>> Big Jim,
>>>>
>>>> How long does a 10-12 lb brisket usually take at 300-400 degrees to
>>>> cook?
>>>>
>>>> Scott
>>>>
>>>
>>> I'm not Big Jim but I can imagine his answer would be "until you can
>>> turn a two prong fork in the flat easily". VBG
>>>
>>> Jay

>> Jay got it right.
>> It takes 6-7 hours when cooking between 375° and 400°

>
>
> But why would anyone try to cook a brisket at those absurd temps? Leather
> manufacturing?



Har! You folks just don't get it do you?

I was never an advocate of Big Jim's temps until I'd actually tasted some of
his product. Now I sit on the other side of the fence laughing at you folks
wasting precious time and energy trying to choke your fire down to absurdly
low levels.

Shit, I can cook at 150 here in Fl with *no* fire. Sometimes it's hard to
keep a fire under 300. I just let it roll and eat earlier.

TFM®


  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
M&M
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods


On 4-May-2004, Bubbabob > wrote:

> But why would anyone try to cook a brisket at those absurd temps? Leather
> manufacturing?


What a moron. Go your own way dude. We feed the multitudes and they keep
coming back for more. I had some of Big Jim's (warmed over ) brisket last
saturday and it was to die for. Do your thing, I'll do his. Oh yeh, there
wasn't
any sauce on it either. And when you can equal his cole slaw, come and tell
me how you did it.
--
M&M ("When You're Over The Hill You Pick Up Speed")
  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bubba Unix Dude
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods


"TFM®" > wrote in message
. com...
> Bubbabob wrote:
> > "Big Jim" > wrote:
> >
> >> > wrote in message
> >> ...
> >>>
> >>>> Big Jim,
> >>>>
> >>>> How long does a 10-12 lb brisket usually take at 300-400 degrees to
> >>>> cook?
> >>>>
> >>>> Scott
> >>>>
> >>>
> >>> I'm not Big Jim but I can imagine his answer would be "until you can
> >>> turn a two prong fork in the flat easily". VBG
> >>>
> >>> Jay
> >> Jay got it right.
> >> It takes 6-7 hours when cooking between 375° and 400°

> >
> >
> > But why would anyone try to cook a brisket at those absurd temps?

Leather
> > manufacturing?

>
>
> Har! You folks just don't get it do you?
>
> I was never an advocate of Big Jim's temps until I'd actually tasted some

of
> his product. Now I sit on the other side of the fence laughing at you

folks
> wasting precious time and energy trying to choke your fire down to

absurdly
> low levels.
>
> Shit, I can cook at 150 here in Fl with *no* fire. Sometimes it's hard to
> keep a fire under 300. I just let it roll and eat earlier.
>
> TFM®
>
>


Big Jim has definitely opened my eyes. I appreciate the information from
everyone. I have learned a lot. I will try this out and my next brisket will
definitely be done this way. I am curious to see if I can achieve the same
results as Big Jim is known for.

Now, earlier in this thread, someone mentioned to not trim any of the fat
off a brisket. Here is a follow up question. I like to use the big packer
cuts that are 10 to 15 lbs plus in size. Those big packer cuts here in the
Phoenix area come with the hard tallowy-like fat. I have read that this fat
doesn't render well and should be trimmed away. Any opinions and ideas?

Scott




  #31 (permalink)   Report Post  
Bubba Unix Dude
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods


"Bubbabob" > wrote in message
s.com...
> "Big Jim" > wrote:
>
> > wrote in message
> > ...
> >>
> >> >Big Jim,
> >> >
> >> >How long does a 10-12 lb brisket usually take at 300-400 degrees to
> >> >cook?
> >> >
> >> >Scott
> >> >
> >>
> >> I'm not Big Jim but I can imagine his answer would be "until you can
> >> turn a two prong fork in the flat easily". VBG
> >>
> >> Jay

> > Jay got it right.
> > It takes 6-7 hours when cooking between 375° and 400°

>
>
> But why would anyone try to cook a brisket at those absurd temps? Leather
> manufacturing?


Well I tried the higher temps last night. Even though it wasn't a brisket, I
cooked two 7-8 lb. pork butt roasts on my WSM last night at the higher temps
that Big Jim has suggested. I used two chimneys of glowing white hot
Kingsford Briquets for my fire. I then put 5-6 chunks of hickory directly
onto the fire to produce some hickory smoke flavor. I put sand in my water
pan and covered with aluminum foil. The vents were left wide open and I was
able to maintain internal WSM temps of about 330-335 degrees. I put the
roasts on the top grill fat side down. The roasts were finished in 3 hrs and
20 minutes and came off at about 165 degrees (personal preference - I like
sliceable pork not the pulled pork that comes off at 190 degrees which in
the past was dry). The roasts had a nice thick bark and the color was a rich
dark brown-red on the surface.

One word on the taste - Wow! Best pork butts that I have ever done. The
great thing that it took 3 hrs and 20 minutes instead of the normal 7-8
hours from before.

I am now anxious to try this with a brisket...

Scott


  #32 (permalink)   Report Post  
Dave Bugg
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

Bubba Unix Dude wrote:

> Now, earlier in this thread, someone mentioned to not trim any of the
> fat off a brisket. Here is a follow up question. I like to use the
> big packer cuts that are 10 to 15 lbs plus in size. Those big packer
> cuts here in the Phoenix area come with the hard tallowy-like fat. I
> have read that this fat doesn't render well and should be trimmed
> away. Any opinions and ideas?


It depends on the thickness of the fat, really. I like to have between 1/4
to 3/8", and will trim anything beyond that. Most of the time, the "packer
cuts" -- see my note below --- will be trimmed to that level prior to cvp.
Dave

NOTE: There ain't no such thing as a "packer cut" around here. Most of the
meat packers and butchers that I've talked to, and have purchased from,
order by the USDA standardized "Institutional Meat Purchase Specifications".
I think the term "packer cut" refers to the IMPS (Institutional Meat
Purchase Specifications) number of either 119 or 120. For those who would
like to confirm this, I've posted the URL below. This is a PDF file. The
description of the brisket cuts begin on page 30. I typically will order
Brisket 119, although Brisket 120 isn't bad.
http://www.ams.usda.gov/lsg/imps/imps100.pdf


  #33 (permalink)   Report Post  
Chef Juke
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

On Tue, 04 May 2004 22:01:47 GMT, "Big Jim" >
wrote:

<snip>
>
> If you ever tried to cook one at those ABSURD temps you would know.
> Sometimes you don't have time to do it the slow way.
> BTW what qualifies you to make the ABSURD atatment? Tell us how you cook
>briskets.
> There are plenty of people on the NG that have eaten my briskets. Ask
>them.
> Appearently you have some experience in leather making.


Hey Big Jim?

How long did you cook that brisket we had Saturday
(http://www.chefjuke.com/bigjim/html/bigjim-017.html) and at what temp
didja cook it?

If that was 400 degree brisket then I'm cooking at 400 from now on!

MMMM that was good!



-Chef Juke
http://www.chefjuke.com
"Everybody Eats when they come to MY house!"

(Remove the CAPS from the return address when sending email replies)

  #34 (permalink)   Report Post  
Big Jim
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods


"Chef Juke" > wrote in message
...
> On Tue, 04 May 2004 22:01:47 GMT, "Big Jim" >
> wrote:
>
> <snip>
> >
> > If you ever tried to cook one at those ABSURD temps you would know.
> > Sometimes you don't have time to do it the slow way.
> > BTW what qualifies you to make the ABSURD atatment? Tell us how you cook
> >briskets.
> > There are plenty of people on the NG that have eaten my briskets. Ask
> >them.
> > Appearently you have some experience in leather making.

>
> Hey Big Jim?
>
> How long did you cook that brisket we had Saturday
> (http://www.chefjuke.com/bigjim/html/bigjim-017.html) and at what temp
> didja cook it?
>
> If that was 400 degree brisket then I'm cooking at 400 from now on!
>
> MMMM that was good!
>
>
>
> -Chef Juke
> http://www.chefjuke.com
> "Everybody Eats when they come to MY house!"
>
> (Remove the CAPS from the return address when sending email replies)


Right at 400, maybe a bit under.
--
Big Jim

www.lazyq.com


  #35 (permalink)   Report Post  
Steve Wertz
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

On Thu, 06 May 2004 00:20:37 GMT, "Big Jim" >
wrote:

> Right at 400, maybe a bit under.


And how long does a 400F brisket take?

-sw


  #36 (permalink)   Report Post  
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

Bubba Unix Dude wrote:

> Big Jim has definitely opened my eyes. I appreciate the information from
> everyone. I have learned a lot. I will try this out and my next brisket

will
> definitely be done this way. I am curious to see if I can achieve the same
> results as Big Jim is known for.
>
> Now, earlier in this thread, someone mentioned to not trim any of the fat
> off a brisket. Here is a follow up question. I like to use the big packer
> cuts that are 10 to 15 lbs plus in size. Those big packer cuts here in the
> Phoenix area come with the hard tallowy-like fat. I have read that this

fat
> doesn't render well and should be trimmed away. Any opinions and ideas?




I don't reckon I could fault you for trimming the "meteorite" from the
packer cut.

I never trim anything until it's cooked, but that big lump of shit should
prolly go.

TFM®


  #37 (permalink)   Report Post  
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

Bubba Unix Dude wrote:


The roasts were finished in 3 hrs and
> 20 minutes and came off at about 165 degrees (personal preference - I like
> sliceable pork not the pulled pork that comes off at 190 degrees which in
> the past was dry).



This shoulda been your first clue that you were doing something wrong by
cooking so slowly.

TFM®


  #38 (permalink)   Report Post  
TFM®
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

Steve Wertz wrote:
> On Thu, 06 May 2004 00:20:37 GMT, "Big Jim" >
> wrote:
>
>> Right at 400, maybe a bit under.

>
> And how long does a 400F brisket take?
>
> -sw



Same as the rest of 'em.........until they're done.

TMF®


  #39 (permalink)   Report Post  
Steve Wertz
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

On Thu, 06 May 2004 03:49:31 GMT, "TFM®"
> wrote:

>Steve Wertz wrote:
>> On Thu, 06 May 2004 00:20:37 GMT, "Big Jim" >
>> wrote:
>>
>>> Right at 400, maybe a bit under.

>>
>> And how long does a 400F brisket take?

>
>Same as the rest of 'em.........until they're done.


Certainly you can narrow it down to a two hour span. I've done
brisket at 300 and it takes about 7 hours. So I'd guess 400 could
take as little as 4-5.

-sw (still wondering why an oven can cook a brisket in 4.5 hours
at 250F)
  #40 (permalink)   Report Post  
Randolph M. Jones
 
Posts: n/a
Default Brisket Methods

Big Jim wrote:
> "Chef Juke" > wrote in message
> ...
>
>>On Tue, 04 May 2004 22:01:47 GMT, "Big Jim" >
>>wrote:
>>
>><snip>
>>
>>>If you ever tried to cook one at those ABSURD temps you would know.
>>>Sometimes you don't have time to do it the slow way.
>>>BTW what qualifies you to make the ABSURD atatment? Tell us how you cook
>>>briskets.
>>> There are plenty of people on the NG that have eaten my briskets. Ask
>>>them.
>>> Appearently you have some experience in leather making.

>>
>>Hey Big Jim?
>>
>>How long did you cook that brisket we had Saturday
>>(http://www.chefjuke.com/bigjim/html/bigjim-017.html) and at what temp
>>didja cook it?
>>
>>If that was 400 degree brisket then I'm cooking at 400 from now on!
>>
>>MMMM that was good!
>>
>>
>>
>>-Chef Juke
>>http://www.chefjuke.com
>>"Everybody Eats when they come to MY house!"
>>
>>(Remove the CAPS from the return address when sending email replies)

>
>
> Right at 400, maybe a bit under.


So what's the secret? What does this work? Is "low and slow" simply
unnecessary? Or do you do something special to make up for the high
temperatures?

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