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Bob-tx 20-10-2009 12:16 PM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
Have never grilled, smoked, cooked, or eaten fresh salmon. Want to
try grilling some. Any suggestions on spices, techniques, etc?

Thanks, Bob-tx



RegForte 20-10-2009 01:59 PM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
Bob-tx wrote:

Have never grilled, smoked, cooked, or eaten fresh salmon. Want to
try grilling some. Any suggestions on spices, techniques, etc?

Thanks, Bob-tx



I like to brine then grill with nothing but a light coat of olive oil,
salt and pepper. No sauces, mops or other adornments. The key
is in the prep, and then not overcooking it.

I use this brining process.

http://www.3men.com/threemen1.htm

Basically, the ratio is 2 C salt per gallon of water, brined for about
two hours.

When cooking (any kind, grilling, smoking, etc), the core temp should go
not much higher than 130 F so it's still slightly underdone in the
center.

--
Reg

Tutall 20-10-2009 03:18 PM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
On Oct 20, 5:59*am, RegForte wrote:
Bob-tx wrote:
Have never grilled, smoked, cooked, or eaten fresh salmon. *Want to
try grilling some. *Any suggestions on spices, techniques, etc?


Thanks, *Bob-tx


I like to brine then grill with nothing but a light coat of olive oil,
salt and pepper. No sauces, mops or other adornments. The key
is in the prep, and then not overcooking it.


Listen to Reg, man knows his cooking and seafood.

Pacific Salmon is my favorite meat, Atlantic (aka farm), not so much.
Have never tried brining one, will have to give it a try.


v this is the important part v

When cooking (any kind, grilling, smoking, etc), the core temp should go
not much higher than 130 F so it's still slightly underdone in the
center.


^ this is the important part ^
This is perfection...........


Absolutely, edges will become flakey, and the flakyness will increase
with doneness, and help give an indication of doneness. Do NOT
overcook. You can always put an undercooked one in the microwave for
30 seconds or so, but you can't undo overcooked.

I use the same distance/heat as I would for a pork tenderloin, doing
the steak direct for 2-3 minutes or so a side, flipping twice and
depending on color will move it (just) off to the side of the fire
where there's still plenty of radiant heat, but not quite so much as
direct. Lowering the lid will speed things along of course.
Sorry about the vague (lack of) times, I should time it the next time
I do one.

Have found I get more consistant results when I use a wris****ch and
time stuff when grilling steaks, so should probably do the same for
salmon steak.

Last month we had some fresh salmon in from Alaska, oh lord it was
good. Didn't mess it up, hate to overcook or make a mess of such a
fine cut of meat.

If you can get your hands on Pacific salmon (deep red color), do it!


Janet Wilder[_1_] 20-10-2009 04:50 PM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
Bob-tx wrote:
Have never grilled, smoked, cooked, or eaten fresh salmon. Want to
try grilling some. Any suggestions on spices, techniques, etc?

Thanks, Bob-tx



I use an untreated cedar plank. I soak the plank in water for at least 2
hours then put it on an old cookie sheet. Oil the plank with cooking
oil. Put the fish on the plank, skin side down.

I make a glaze out of chopped fresh ginger and pure maple syrup that I
boil together for a couple of minutes and lightly brush the fish before
cooking and once or twice while cooking.

Grill it with the cover down on the gas grill until it becomes opaque
and flakes easily with a fork.

I like to use Keta salmon. A whole side fillet is the perfect size to
serve 4 people with some leftover or even seconds.

I never use Atlantic farm-raised salmon. It has no flavor and is
artificially colored.

I don't care for brining as we don't like salt and we *can* taste it.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

Pete C. 20-10-2009 05:00 PM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 

Bob-tx wrote:

Have never grilled, smoked, cooked, or eaten fresh salmon. Want to
try grilling some. Any suggestions on spices, techniques, etc?

Thanks, Bob-tx


I typically smoke a side of salmon in the smoker when I'm smoking 'Q.
Since the brisket takes nearly forever and the salmon only a couple
hours the salmon is a nice lunch while tending the smoker. I never add
anything but a little salt and pepper.

Tutall 20-10-2009 05:10 PM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
On Oct 20, 8:50*am, Janet Wilder wrote:

I make a glaze out of chopped fresh ginger and pure maple syrup that I
boil together for a couple of minutes and lightly brush the fish before
cooking and once or twice while cooking.


IMO this is like putting A-1 sauce on a good steak. Have you tried it
with just simple S&P or similar?

And sugar near high heat? *shrug*




ChefToddMohr 20-10-2009 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob-tx (Post 1393193)
Have never grilled, smoked, cooked, or eaten fresh salmon. Want to
try grilling some. Any suggestions on spices, techniques, etc?

One of my favorite flavors is hickory smoke. Salmon is a perfect fish for smoking because it has more fat and oil than lean white fish.

Smoking is very easy, once you've done it once. Even if you don't have a smoker, it can be accomplished on your stove-top or barbeque grill.

Smoking uses indirect heat to impart the flavor of smoked wood. Hot smoking should not reach temperatures above 180f.

Soak your wood chips for up to 5 hours in water, apple juice, chicken stock, any liquid you'd like. Soaking overnight saturates the wood too much and you wind up steaming the fish.

You'll need a roasting pan or casserole pan with a lid and a rack to suspend the fish above the wood. After soaking and draining the wood chips, place them on the bottom of your pan, put the lid on, and start a low flame on the stove.

When the wood begins to smoke, not burn, place the salmon on the rack. Smoke the item "low and slow" until your instant read thermometer reaches 160f. Remove the item and let rest for carry-over cooking.

On your barbeque grill, whether coals or gas, place a small metal pan directly on the coals or lava rocks on one side of the grill. There should be no coals or gas burner lit on the other side. When it starts smoking, place the salmon on the side of the grill opposite the smoking wood. Again, you know when it's done by your thermometer, not by time, not by poking or gashing the fish.

You can marinate the fish first, or give it a dry rub. When marinating salmon, be careful not to use an acidic marinade. Citrus juices, vinegars, wine, and liquors will cook the delicate fish.

Once you get this method, you'll be smoking tomatoes for sauce, red peppers as a salad ingredient, not to mention smoked steak or chicken.

Brick[_3_] 21-10-2009 01:16 AM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 

On 20-Oct-2009, Tutall wrote:

On Oct 20, 5:59*am, RegForte wrote:
Bob-tx wrote:
Have never grilled, smoked, cooked, or eaten fresh salmon. *Want to
try grilling some. *Any suggestions on spices, techniques, etc?


.. . .


Have found I get more consistant results when I use a wris****ch and
time stuff when grilling steaks, so should probably do the same for
salmon steak.


Speaking of wris****ch. I've been wearing a Casio Alarm Chronograph
wris****ch for about 30 years. It has a very convenient stopwatch
function that is perfect for timing steaks. Since I wear it all the time,
I never misplace it. You can get one direct from Casio for $23 and
change. I just bought a new one. Features are virtually unchaged in
30 years and the price is about the same despite inflation. (The buttons
on the old one got too stiff for my elderly fingers)

Didn't mean to hijack the thread. Carry on.
--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)

Janet Wilder[_1_] 21-10-2009 03:16 AM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
Tutall wrote:
On Oct 20, 8:50 am, Janet Wilder wrote:

I make a glaze out of chopped fresh ginger and pure maple syrup that I
boil together for a couple of minutes and lightly brush the fish before
cooking and once or twice while cooking.


IMO this is like putting A-1 sauce on a good steak. Have you tried it
with just simple S&P or similar?

And sugar near high heat? *shrug*



The "sugar" is not near the heat and the heat is not all that high.

Yes we have tried it with just pepper and garlic (if you would have read
my post without first putting on your "yuck!" face, you would have seen
that we do not like salt. We like the little bit of sweet from the maple
syrup.

We got this recipe in New Brunswick, Canada where they mostly plank the
salmon and maple syrup is something Canadians do all the time. The
ginger was my own.

If you don't want to eat it, they you are not invited the next time I do
one.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

Nonny 21-10-2009 04:21 AM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
"Janet Wilder" wrote in message
...
Tutall wrote:
On Oct 20, 8:50 am, Janet Wilder
wrote:

I make a glaze out of chopped fresh ginger and pure maple
syrup that I
boil together for a couple of minutes and lightly brush the
fish before
cooking and once or twice while cooking.


IMO this is like putting A-1 sauce on a good steak. Have you
tried it
with just simple S&P or similar?

And sugar near high heat? *shrug*



The "sugar" is not near the heat and the heat is not all that
high.

Yes we have tried it with just pepper and garlic (if you would
have read my post without first putting on your "yuck!" face,
you would have seen that we do not like salt. We like the little
bit of sweet from the maple syrup.

We got this recipe in New Brunswick, Canada where they mostly
plank the salmon and maple syrup is something Canadians do all
the time. The ginger was my own.

If you don't want to eat it, they you are not invited the next
time I do one.

--
Janet Wilder
Way-the-heck-south Texas
Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.


Janet, we have Salmon roughly weekly. We usually do it with the
same method, and you might want to give it a try.

Salmon is cut into fillets with the skin ON. It's washed and
drained before preparation, then doused liberally with olive oil.

Placed skin side down, the flesh side is then sprinkled with
Kosher salt and then covered liberally with dry dill weed.
Period.

The grill is preheated to as high as it goes, then the grates
sprayed with Pam for Grilling. Immediately, the salmon is placed
flesh side down and cooked for 3-4 minutes, max. It's then
flipped to flesh side up and cooked until the thickest part is
120f maximum. By then, the skin is hardened at the edges.

It's served with our ginger butter sauce, which I've posted
before. If you ask, I'll post it again. We serve the salmon in
about 8 ounce fillets per person and that seems to be about right.
Most prefer to flip the fillet over, remove the skin and then use
the side of a fork to remove most of the dark fat/line before
flipping it back over and enjoying.

--
Nonny

Live a good and honorable life.
Then when you get older and
think back, you'll enjoy it
a second time.




Tutall 21-10-2009 05:21 AM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
On Oct 20, 7:16*pm, Janet Wilder wrote:
Tutall wrote:
On Oct 20, 8:50 am, Janet Wilder wrote:


I make a glaze out of chopped fresh ginger and pure maple syrup that I
boil together for a couple of minutes and lightly brush the fish before
cooking and once or twice while cooking.


IMO this is like putting A-1 sauce on a good steak. Have you tried it
with just simple S&P or similar?


And sugar near high heat? *shrug*


The "sugar" is not near the heat and the heat is not all that high.

Yes we have tried it with just pepper and garlic (if you would have read
my post without first putting on your "yuck!" face, you would have seen
that we do not like salt. We like the little bit of sweet from the maple
syrup.


And if you weren't looking to be ****ed off and offended you would
have seen I said:
"or similar". Gives a lot of leeway to remove the salt don't that?
BTW, I've made something very similar, didn't like the sugar on
salmon flavor myself. If you do, good on ya, no problem with others
enjoying something I don't.

If you don't want to eat it, they you are not invited the next time I do
one.


*sigh*

Damn, made an effort to play nice too. Time wasted on someone wanting
to take offense?

I thought I made it clear that it's a taste thing and that you're
welcome to yours. I did not say your recipe sux balls six ways to
Dallas now did I? What the hell did I write that got your salmontail
Janet?

And no, I don't expect an invite for salmon within 1,000 miles of the
Pecos. Beef, Mex, chiles? Sure, I wouldn't expect you to be as
experienced with dungeness either, no sin on your side. I know you can
teach me some things, but salmon, dungeness? Mebbe not, eh? -
Canadian do this all the time, heheheh, eh


When wild salmon was as (relatively) common (used to catch it
occasionally) as it had been once apon a time, I would play with
variations too just for a change. Now that the California salmon run
is almost dead, and wild pacific salmon of any type is dear, you won't
find me messing with the meat, it's too damn good as is.
Same way I don't play with good cuts of steak the way I once did. But
unlike beef, the salmon are almost gone now.

Chill Janet, no offense was intended.


Bob-tx 21-10-2009 11:49 AM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 

"Bob-tx" wrote in message
...
Have never grilled, smoked, cooked, or eaten fresh salmon. Want
to try grilling some. Any suggestions on spices, techniques, etc?

Thanks, Bob-tx

My wife had already bought some salmon - before I read all the
answers, so she got Atlantic salmon since it was on sale ($7.95 lb).
I thought I would go simple for first time - salt, pepper, olive
oil. It turned out okay and I liked it fair, but my wife didn't
care for it - too fishy.

I have smoked and grilled catfish a good deal over the years, and
really like that.
Anyway, thanks for all the good advice - printed off for later use.

Bob-tx



KW[_3_] 21-10-2009 08:57 PM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 

"Tutall" wrote in message
...
On Oct 20, 7:16 pm, Janet Wilder wrote:
If you don't want to eat it, they you are not invited the next time I do
one.


*sigh*


I did not say your recipe sux balls six ways to
Dallas now did I?


Errrrrrrrrr....perhaps this could be misconstrued in such a manner by the
Lady Wilder... :-)

"IMO this is like putting A-1 sauce on a good steak."
"And sugar near high heat? *shrug*"

Back on topic. I follow the simpler is better mantra myself.

Usually drizzle very lightly melted butter or olive oil and a fine
sprinkling of cayenne pepper. For variations we may spritz with citrus juice
after plating and/or serve with a spicy homeade fresh peach salsa (in
season). As others have said, do not overcook. I like it the same as my
steaks with a cool pink center.

KW






RegForte 21-10-2009 09:05 PM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
Nunya Bidnits wrote:

Hey Reg,

How about halibut? How would you treat steaks differently from filet, if at
all?

MartyB


Ah, halibut. If I'm lucky I can get them off the docs down in
Half Moon Bay. As far as prep, they get the same treatment as
salmon. I would do steaks (by that you mean crosscut, right?)
the same way as fillet.

I do prefer halibut with slightly less smoke, though. For
some reason I find it oversmokes easily.

--
Reg

RegForte 21-10-2009 09:13 PM

Ques' on grilling salmon
 
Bob-tx wrote:

My wife had already bought some salmon - before I read all the
answers, so she got Atlantic salmon since it was on sale ($7.95 lb).
I thought I would go simple for first time - salt, pepper, olive
oil. It turned out okay and I liked it fair, but my wife didn't
care for it - too fishy.

I have smoked and grilled catfish a good deal over the years, and
really like that.
Anyway, thanks for all the good advice - printed off for later use.

Bob-tx



Hey Bob-tx...

Here's a tip or two to tone down the fishiosity of salmon

1. Get fresher / better quality product (obvious but it bears
repeating)

2. Remove the bloodline before serving

The bloodline is the darker meat (brownish, distinctly different
from normal salmon pink color) near and around the undersurface
of the skin. It's higher in oil and has a much stronger flavor.

It won't hurt to eat it, though. I often leave it especially
with high quality stuff, but it may be the way to go for your
wife's sake.

--
Reg


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