Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 29-09-2009, 08:01 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Question: Converting ti infrared

One of my 2 grills is a Brinkman gas. Is it possible to convert one or
two of the burners to infrared?

I can'r find anything on that.

Thanks!


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Old 29-09-2009, 11:41 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Question: Converting ti infrared


"Gene" wrote in message
news
One of my 2 grills is a Brinkman gas. Is it possible to convert one or
two of the burners to infrared?

I can'r find anything on that.

Thanks!


I've been chasing "infrared" quite a bit lately and haven't seen that. .
Brinkman doesn't, at the moment, make an infrared grill. I think the only
low-medium buck grill company to make an infrared product is Charbroil. I
don't think there is a burner product you can put in into an existing grill.
Nonny may have done this somehow, based on a recent message in this NG. For
me the primary reason to have an infrared burner would be to raise the
searing temperature from its usual 700F or so to 1200F or so, like the
Salamandar burner used in restaurants. I don't think the Charbroil, nor the
other pricey infrared grills do this. In a recent article in CU testing
grills they really didn't distinguish the infrared grill from the old
fashioned grill, except to point which grills had it. Infrared burners will
change things, as much as induction cooking. I wish Weber would come out
with an infrared grill..

Let us know,

Ed, sticking with charcoal for the moment,



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Old 29-09-2009, 02:50 PM
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene View Post
One of my 2 grills is a Brinkman gas. Is it possible to convert one or
two of the burners to infrared?
I wouldn't think so, unless you're one of those creative engineers.

Your brinkman is gas, infrared is electric, no?
Wouldn't the gas burner destroy the IR next to it in the grill?

Why do you want to do this?
__________________
Chef Todd Mohr
WebCookingClasses.com
http://www.WebCookingClasses.com
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Old 29-09-2009, 06:32 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Question: Converting ti infrared


"ChefToddMohr" wrote in message
...

Gene;1383411 Wrote:
One of my 2 grills is a Brinkman gas. Is it possible to convert one or
two of the burners to infrared?


I wouldn't think so, unless you're one of those creative engineers.

Your brinkman is gas, infrared is electric, no?
Wouldn't the gas burner destroy the IR next to it in the grill?

Why do you want to do this?




--
ChefToddMohr


The infrared burners I referred to in my post are all propane. I'm sure
that's what Gene was looking for.

Ed



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Old 29-09-2009, 06:42 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Question: Converting ti infrared


"Gene" wrote in message
news
One of my 2 grills is a Brinkman gas. Is it possible to convert
one or
two of the burners to infrared?

I can'r find anything on that.


Unless you are good at metalwork and have an understanding of how
the IR burners work, it might not turn out too well. I bought a
portable IR grill a few years back, gutted it and added a second
IR emitter, also converting to NG from LP. It took some brazing,
a lot of metal bending/drilling and a whole new manifold to get it
working, but it was worth it.

FWIW, our local Sam's Club was closing out a Member's Mark SS
grill that had an IR on one side. The regular price was $400, as
I recall, and they were asking $300 for the floor model. If you
check Sam's Club or its website, you might be able to find one and
save a bunch of money.

--
Nonny

To compel a man to subsidize with
taxes the propagation of policies
he abhors, is sinful and tyrannical.





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Old 29-09-2009, 07:24 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Question: Converting ti infrared

On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 03:41:49 -0700, "Theron"
wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
news
One of my 2 grills is a Brinkman gas. Is it possible to convert one or
two of the burners to infrared?

I can'r find anything on that.

Thanks!


I've been chasing "infrared" quite a bit lately and haven't seen that. .
Brinkman doesn't, at the moment, make an infrared grill. I think the only
low-medium buck grill company to make an infrared product is Charbroil. I
don't think there is a burner product you can put in into an existing grill.
Nonny may have done this somehow, based on a recent message in this NG. For
me the primary reason to have an infrared burner would be to raise the
searing temperature from its usual 700F or so to 1200F or so, like the
Salamandar burner used in restaurants. I don't think the Charbroil, nor the
other pricey infrared grills do this. In a recent article in CU testing
grills they really didn't distinguish the infrared grill from the old
fashioned grill, except to point which grills had it. Infrared burners will
change things, as much as induction cooking. I wish Weber would come out
with an infrared grill..

Let us know,

Ed, sticking with charcoal for the moment,


I want it to sear steaks with out having to fire up my wood. Have to
wait and see.....
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Old 29-09-2009, 07:27 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Question: Converting ti infrared

On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 14:50:59 +0100, ChefToddMohr
wrote:


Gene;1383411 Wrote:
One of my 2 grills is a Brinkman gas. Is it possible to convert one or
two of the burners to infrared?


I wouldn't think so, unless you're one of those creative engineers.

Your brinkman is gas, infrared is electric, no?
Wouldn't the gas burner destroy the IR next to it in the grill?

Why do you want to do this?


No. It is propane or natural gas, not electric. It does not seem to
hurt the other burners on grills that come with it.

To SEAR with out having to fire up my wood.

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Old 29-09-2009, 07:29 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Question: Converting ti infrared

On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 10:42:19 -0700, "Nonny" wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
news
One of my 2 grills is a Brinkman gas. Is it possible to convert
one or
two of the burners to infrared?

I can'r find anything on that.


Unless you are good at metalwork and have an understanding of how
the IR burners work, it might not turn out too well. I bought a
portable IR grill a few years back, gutted it and added a second
IR emitter, also converting to NG from LP. It took some brazing,
a lot of metal bending/drilling and a whole new manifold to get it
working, but it was worth it.

FWIW, our local Sam's Club was closing out a Member's Mark SS
grill that had an IR on one side. The regular price was $400, as
I recall, and they were asking $300 for the floor model. If you
check Sam's Club or its website, you might be able to find one and
save a bunch of money.


Too rich for me right now, but thanks for the tip.

I do not have the tools to do what you did. Guess this will have to
wait. OH well!

Thanks for lookin for me before I leap!
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Old 29-09-2009, 07:46 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 248
Default Question: Converting ti infrared


"Gene" wrote in message
...

Too rich for me right now, but thanks for the tip.

I do not have the tools to do what you did. Guess this will have
to
wait. OH well!

Thanks for lookin for me before I leap!


We've always enjoyed 'char rare' steaks and some seafood like
shrimp can be improved with a blast of high heat to blacken the
loose edges. Before building the IR grill, I always kept an LP
torch out by the grill and used it with MAPP gas to sear foods.
Perhaps that would be an inexpensive idea for you. To this day, I
use it on squid and shrimp, with occasional touch-up of chicken
wings.

The idea is to go ahead and cook the food on the grill like you
normally would, then fire up the MAPP gas torch just before
removing it. A pass over seafood adds to the flavor and takes
virtually no time. Steaks benefit as well, though you don't get
the stripes like you do with a true IR Grill. Give it a try- the
torches are cheap and can be found at Lowe's, Home Depot or any
hardware store. LP works, but if you get a MAPP gas cylinder for
it, it'll give you a hotter flame and better searing.

--
Nonny

To compel a man to subsidize with
taxes the propagation of policies
he abhors, is sinful and tyrannical.



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Old 29-09-2009, 08:06 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 63
Default Question: Converting ti infrared

On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 11:46:16 -0700, "Nonny" wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
.. .

Too rich for me right now, but thanks for the tip.

I do not have the tools to do what you did. Guess this will have
to
wait. OH well!

Thanks for lookin for me before I leap!


We've always enjoyed 'char rare' steaks and some seafood like
shrimp can be improved with a blast of high heat to blacken the
loose edges. Before building the IR grill, I always kept an LP
torch out by the grill and used it with MAPP gas to sear foods.
Perhaps that would be an inexpensive idea for you. To this day, I
use it on squid and shrimp, with occasional touch-up of chicken
wings.

The idea is to go ahead and cook the food on the grill like you
normally would, then fire up the MAPP gas torch just before
removing it. A pass over seafood adds to the flavor and takes
virtually no time. Steaks benefit as well, though you don't get
the stripes like you do with a true IR Grill. Give it a try- the
torches are cheap and can be found at Lowe's, Home Depot or any
hardware store. LP works, but if you get a MAPP gas cylinder for
it, it'll give you a hotter flame and better searing.


I will have to try MAPP. Wouldn't you want to hit the meat with it
FIRST? Thanks much for all the info!

If I want to sear I use wood. I can get that over 700 degrees. But of
course I'm looking for a solution that is quick.

Perhaps LOX ?

Hehhehe


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Old 30-09-2009, 12:25 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 516
Default Question: Converting ti infrared


"Gene" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 11:46:16 -0700, "Nonny" wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
. ..

Too rich for me right now, but thanks for the tip.

I do not have the tools to do what you did. Guess this will have
to
wait. OH well!

Thanks for lookin for me before I leap!


We've always enjoyed 'char rare' steaks and some seafood like
shrimp can be improved with a blast of high heat to blacken the
loose edges. Before building the IR grill, I always kept an LP
torch out by the grill and used it with MAPP gas to sear foods.
Perhaps that would be an inexpensive idea for you. To this day, I
use it on squid and shrimp, with occasional touch-up of chicken
wings.

The idea is to go ahead and cook the food on the grill like you
normally would, then fire up the MAPP gas torch just before
removing it. A pass over seafood adds to the flavor and takes
virtually no time. Steaks benefit as well, though you don't get
the stripes like you do with a true IR Grill. Give it a try- the
torches are cheap and can be found at Lowe's, Home Depot or any
hardware store. LP works, but if you get a MAPP gas cylinder for
it, it'll give you a hotter flame and better searing.


I will have to try MAPP. Wouldn't you want to hit the meat with it
FIRST? Thanks much for all the info!

If I want to sear I use wood. I can get that over 700 degrees. But of
course I'm looking for a solution that is quick.

Perhaps LOX ?

Hehhehe


If you don't have cast iron grates on your Brinkmann try to find a cast iron
grate that will fit. Grill with the flat side of the grade toward the meat
and you'll get the most sear possible. Plain cast iron is fine, but keeping
it seasoned and rust free on a outside gas grill is almost impossible, for
me at least. If you can find a porceleinized grate, that's probably the
best. Stainless steel is the worst grate material from a searing
standpoint.. Doing this made quite a difference for me; it's not anything
like charcoal, but better than before.

Ed





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Old 30-09-2009, 12:47 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 63
Default Question: Converting ti infrared

On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 16:25:06 -0700, "Theron"
wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
.. .
On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 11:46:16 -0700, "Nonny" wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
...

Too rich for me right now, but thanks for the tip.

I do not have the tools to do what you did. Guess this will have
to
wait. OH well!

Thanks for lookin for me before I leap!

We've always enjoyed 'char rare' steaks and some seafood like
shrimp can be improved with a blast of high heat to blacken the
loose edges. Before building the IR grill, I always kept an LP
torch out by the grill and used it with MAPP gas to sear foods.
Perhaps that would be an inexpensive idea for you. To this day, I
use it on squid and shrimp, with occasional touch-up of chicken
wings.

The idea is to go ahead and cook the food on the grill like you
normally would, then fire up the MAPP gas torch just before
removing it. A pass over seafood adds to the flavor and takes
virtually no time. Steaks benefit as well, though you don't get
the stripes like you do with a true IR Grill. Give it a try- the
torches are cheap and can be found at Lowe's, Home Depot or any
hardware store. LP works, but if you get a MAPP gas cylinder for
it, it'll give you a hotter flame and better searing.


I will have to try MAPP. Wouldn't you want to hit the meat with it
FIRST? Thanks much for all the info!

If I want to sear I use wood. I can get that over 700 degrees. But of
course I'm looking for a solution that is quick.

Perhaps LOX ?

Hehhehe


If you don't have cast iron grates on your Brinkmann try to find a cast iron
grate that will fit. Grill with the flat side of the grade toward the meat
and you'll get the most sear possible. Plain cast iron is fine, but keeping
it seasoned and rust free on a outside gas grill is almost impossible, for
me at least. If you can find a porceleinized grate, that's probably the
best. Stainless steel is the worst grate material from a searing
standpoint.. Doing this made quite a difference for me; it's not anything
like charcoal, but better than before.

Ed




Yes, I have porcelin covered cast iron grates.

The searing process has nothing to do with the type of grate and
EVERYTHING to do with how high a heat you can get.

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Old 30-09-2009, 05:45 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 516
Default Question: Converting ti infrared


"Gene" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 16:25:06 -0700, "Theron"
wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
. ..
On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 11:46:16 -0700, "Nonny" wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
m...

Too rich for me right now, but thanks for the tip.

I do not have the tools to do what you did. Guess this will have
to
wait. OH well!

Thanks for lookin for me before I leap!

We've always enjoyed 'char rare' steaks and some seafood like
shrimp can be improved with a blast of high heat to blacken the
loose edges. Before building the IR grill, I always kept an LP
torch out by the grill and used it with MAPP gas to sear foods.
Perhaps that would be an inexpensive idea for you. To this day, I
use it on squid and shrimp, with occasional touch-up of chicken
wings.

The idea is to go ahead and cook the food on the grill like you
normally would, then fire up the MAPP gas torch just before
removing it. A pass over seafood adds to the flavor and takes
virtually no time. Steaks benefit as well, though you don't get
the stripes like you do with a true IR Grill. Give it a try- the
torches are cheap and can be found at Lowe's, Home Depot or any
hardware store. LP works, but if you get a MAPP gas cylinder for
it, it'll give you a hotter flame and better searing.

I will have to try MAPP. Wouldn't you want to hit the meat with it
FIRST? Thanks much for all the info!

If I want to sear I use wood. I can get that over 700 degrees. But of
course I'm looking for a solution that is quick.

Perhaps LOX ?

Hehhehe


If you don't have cast iron grates on your Brinkmann try to find a cast
iron
grate that will fit. Grill with the flat side of the grade toward the meat
and you'll get the most sear possible. Plain cast iron is fine, but
keeping
it seasoned and rust free on a outside gas grill is almost impossible, for
me at least. If you can find a porceleinized grate, that's probably the
best. Stainless steel is the worst grate material from a searing
standpoint.. Doing this made quite a difference for me; it's not anything
like charcoal, but better than before.

Ed




Yes, I have porcelin covered cast iron grates.

The searing process has nothing to do with the type of grate and
EVERYTHING to do with how high a heat you can get.

Gene, the heat output from the propane burner is low to the point where any
"sear" comes from the grate. The degree of "sear" with the same burner will
be different with cast iron, stainless steel, and enamaled steel grates
because of that. With charcoal, with its infrared heat output, you get a
good "sear" that's much less dependant on the heat of the grate. The few
times I've used a cast iron grate on my Weber charcoal grill the sear was
pretty spectacular. However, as we all know, you get great sear from
charcoal and steel grates you see on Weber grills. With an infrared propane
burner on a properly designed grill the sear comes from the heat source
itself, not the grate. Having said that, you still don't want a grate that
obstructs the heat, like the large stainless steel grates you see on
expensive grills.

Ed





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Old 30-09-2009, 06:01 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 63
Default Question: Converting ti infrared

On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 21:45:09 -0700, "Theron"
wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
.. .
On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 16:25:06 -0700, "Theron"
wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 29 Sep 2009 11:46:16 -0700, "Nonny" wrote:


"Gene" wrote in message
om...

Too rich for me right now, but thanks for the tip.

I do not have the tools to do what you did. Guess this will have
to
wait. OH well!

Thanks for lookin for me before I leap!

We've always enjoyed 'char rare' steaks and some seafood like
shrimp can be improved with a blast of high heat to blacken the
loose edges. Before building the IR grill, I always kept an LP
torch out by the grill and used it with MAPP gas to sear foods.
Perhaps that would be an inexpensive idea for you. To this day, I
use it on squid and shrimp, with occasional touch-up of chicken
wings.

The idea is to go ahead and cook the food on the grill like you
normally would, then fire up the MAPP gas torch just before
removing it. A pass over seafood adds to the flavor and takes
virtually no time. Steaks benefit as well, though you don't get
the stripes like you do with a true IR Grill. Give it a try- the
torches are cheap and can be found at Lowe's, Home Depot or any
hardware store. LP works, but if you get a MAPP gas cylinder for
it, it'll give you a hotter flame and better searing.

I will have to try MAPP. Wouldn't you want to hit the meat with it
FIRST? Thanks much for all the info!

If I want to sear I use wood. I can get that over 700 degrees. But of
course I'm looking for a solution that is quick.

Perhaps LOX ?

Hehhehe


If you don't have cast iron grates on your Brinkmann try to find a cast
iron
grate that will fit. Grill with the flat side of the grade toward the meat
and you'll get the most sear possible. Plain cast iron is fine, but
keeping
it seasoned and rust free on a outside gas grill is almost impossible, for
me at least. If you can find a porceleinized grate, that's probably the
best. Stainless steel is the worst grate material from a searing
standpoint.. Doing this made quite a difference for me; it's not anything
like charcoal, but better than before.

Ed




Yes, I have porcelin covered cast iron grates.

The searing process has nothing to do with the type of grate and
EVERYTHING to do with how high a heat you can get.

Gene, the heat output from the propane burner is low to the point where any
"sear" comes from the grate. The degree of "sear" with the same burner will
be different with cast iron, stainless steel, and enamaled steel grates
because of that. With charcoal, with its infrared heat output, you get a
good "sear" that's much less dependant on the heat of the grate. The few
times I've used a cast iron grate on my Weber charcoal grill the sear was
pretty spectacular. However, as we all know, you get great sear from
charcoal and steel grates you see on Weber grills. With an infrared propane
burner on a properly designed grill the sear comes from the heat source
itself, not the grate. Having said that, you still don't want a grate that
obstructs the heat, like the large stainless steel grates you see on
expensive grills.

Ed




I had a Sunshine gril that I loved. It had cast iron burners, cast
iron grate, and a cast iron plate between the two. Yep, hit over 700
degrees at meat level. But the meat was 2 inches away from the flame
and one ince away from the plate.

But the grate was not the factor, anayone could understand that.

I agree stainless is really not that big a deal, even if they try to
sell you on it.

LOX is the answer.


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