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theron 07-09-2009 09:12 PM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 
Here's a list of BBQ cookbooks, almost all of which I haven't heard of. Take
a look at:
http://bbq.netrelief.com/cookbooks/b..._reviews.shtml

Do any use and rely on any of these? I know this subject has been beaten
around a fair amount. However, I think this list may be of interest.

Ed







RegForte 07-09-2009 09:23 PM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 
Theron wrote:

Here's a list of BBQ cookbooks, almost all of which I haven't heard of. Take
a look at:
http://bbq.netrelief.com/cookbooks/b..._reviews.shtml

Do any use and rely on any of these? I know this subject has been beaten
around a fair amount. However, I think this list may be of interest.



The Smoked-Foods Cookbook
by: Lue and Ed Park

Excellent book to broaden your knowledge of smoking beyond the
standard brisket n' butt category. I'm pretty sure this
was the book that helped me perfect various smoked nuts
recipes.

Smoke & Spice
by: Cheryl Alters Jamison & Bill Jamison

Overrated book, but it seems to have struck a chord with many beginners.
A surprising number of people treat this book as some sort of bible. Too
much emphasis on ingredients and not enough on cooking technique.

License To Grill
by: Chris Schlesinger & John Willoughb

Excellent book. I recommend anything by Chris Schlesinger. His skills
go beyond the narrower subject of smoking/grilling to the broader subject
of how to cook properly meat of all kinds in all ways.

theron 07-09-2009 11:44 PM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 

"RegForte" wrote in message
...
Theron wrote:

Here's a list of BBQ cookbooks, almost all of which I haven't heard of.
Take a look at:
http://bbq.netrelief.com/cookbooks/b..._reviews.shtml

Do any use and rely on any of these? I know this subject has been beaten
around a fair amount. However, I think this list may be of interest.



The Smoked-Foods Cookbook
by: Lue and Ed Park

Excellent book to broaden your knowledge of smoking beyond the
standard brisket n' butt category. I'm pretty sure this
was the book that helped me perfect various smoked nuts
recipes.

Smoke & Spice
by: Cheryl Alters Jamison & Bill Jamison

Overrated book, but it seems to have struck a chord with many beginners.
A surprising number of people treat this book as some sort of bible. Too
much emphasis on ingredients and not enough on cooking technique.

License To Grill
by: Chris Schlesinger & John Willoughb

Excellent book. I recommend anything by Chris Schlesinger. His skills
go beyond the narrower subject of smoking/grilling to the broader subject
of how to cook properly meat of all kinds in all ways.


Thanks very much for your help Reg.

Ed




RockPyle 08-09-2009 03:07 PM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 
On Sep 7, 4:23*pm, RegForte wrote:


Smoke & Spice
by: Cheryl Alters Jamison & Bill Jamison

Overrated book, but it seems to have struck a chord with many beginners.
A surprising number of people treat this book as some sort of bible. Too
much emphasis on ingredients and not enough on cooking technique.


I agree with this comment. I am a beginner (perhaps just leaving
beginner stage) who bought this book and expected more discussion of
how-to rather than just a huge number of recipes.

On the good side, though, thumbing through this book shows the breadth
of smokable meats and preparation techniques. It openend my
imagination to what I can do with my smoker.

I am typically a cook who likes to read a number of recipes on a dish
and then pick and choose between them to see what the 'must haves' are
and what are variations among recipes, and then between wht I have in
the cupboard and what sounds good, come up with my plan. This is
where more commentary on the cooking technique is as valuable (if not
moreso) as the ingredients themselves.

I just smoked spareribs for the second time this weekend (cut them to
St. Louis style myself!) and am ready to start playing with some of
the sear first and then smoke recipes they have for tenderloin and
loin.

Rock

Big Jim 08-09-2009 06:42 PM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 

"Theron" wrote in message
...
Here's a list of BBQ cookbooks, almost all of which I haven't heard of.
Take a look at:
http://bbq.netrelief.com/cookbooks/b..._reviews.shtml

Do any use and rely on any of these? I know this subject has been beaten
around a fair amount. However, I think this list may be of interest.

Ed


Ed, that list is from several years ago, BUTTthere are some good books
listed.
In the build your own pit section the pictures of my pits was from 12-14
years ago.
If you are new to Barbecue/grilling you might want to gat a copy of Gary
Wiviott's new book, Low &Slow, Master the art of barbecue in 5 easy lessons.
It covers the use of WSM, offset and Weber Kettle cooking.
If you follow Gary's directions you will cook pretty good Q right out of
the Gate.
You might even see my name in it in a couple of placesG.
Big Jim in North Central Florida.



Charly Horse 09-09-2009 05:44 AM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 
"Big Jim" wrote in
m:


"Theron" wrote in message
...
Here's a list of BBQ cookbooks, almost all of which I haven't heard
of. Take a look at:
http://bbq.netrelief.com/cookbooks/b..._reviews.shtml

Do any use and rely on any of these? I know this subject has been
beaten around a fair amount. However, I think this list may be of
interest.

Ed


Ed, that list is from several years ago, BUTTthere are some good books
listed.
In the build your own pit section the pictures of my pits was from
12-14
years ago.
If you are new to Barbecue/grilling you might want to gat a copy of
Gary
Wiviott's new book, Low &Slow, Master the art of barbecue in 5 easy
lessons.
It covers the use of WSM, offset and Weber Kettle cooking.
If you follow Gary's directions you will cook pretty good Q right
out of
the Gate.
You might even see my name in it in a couple of placesG.
Big Jim in North Central Florida.




Started to reply a few messages up glad I held back.. as usual
shut up n listen you get a little more knowledge. will be lookin
for the books

[email protected][_2_] 09-09-2009 08:34 AM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 
On Sep 8, 11:29*am, "Nunya Bidnits" [email protected]
september.invalid wrote:
RegForte said:



Theron wrote:


Here's a list of BBQ cookbooks, almost all of which I haven't heard
of. Take a *look at:
http://bbq.netrelief.com/cookbooks/b..._reviews.shtml


Do any use and rely on any of these? I know this subject has been
beaten around a fair amount. However, I think this list may be of
interest.


The Smoked-Foods Cookbook
by: Lue and Ed Park


Excellent book to broaden your knowledge of smoking beyond the
standard brisket n' butt category. I'm pretty sure this
was the book that helped me perfect various smoked nuts
recipes.


Smoke & Spice
by: Cheryl Alters Jamison & Bill Jamison


Overrated book, but it seems to have struck a chord with many
beginners. A surprising number of people treat this book as some sort
of bible. Too much emphasis on ingredients and not enough on cooking
technique.


License To Grill
by: Chris Schlesinger & John Willoughb


Excellent book. I recommend anything by Chris Schlesinger. His skills
go beyond the narrower subject of smoking/grilling to the broader
subject of how to cook properly meat of all kinds in all ways.


Those are all excellent suggestions. I agree about Smoke and Spice.

Paul Kirk's Championship Barbecue is a fairly good book too.

MartyB in KC


I like some of Paul's books, too. Probably because if you actually
read the book, IF you can get over his ego, he is a very talented cook
that seems to improvise quite a bit. He isn't restrained by hard,
fast rules.

I have this one, and with some good recipes, it is also a very amusing
read. The guy just loves barbecue and the whole culture of the 'que
and competition.

"Peace, Love, & Barbecue: Recipes, Secrets, Tall Tales, and Outright
Lies from the Legends of Barbecue" by Mike Mills

You can find it for about $15 at Amazon, and cheaper still in the
second hand stores. As much as I like some of the bbq books out
there, I haven't ever had to pay full price for any of them.

Robert

theron 10-09-2009 05:33 AM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 

"Big Jim" wrote in message
m...

"Theron" wrote in message
...
Here's a list of BBQ cookbooks, almost all of which I haven't heard of.
Take a look at:
http://bbq.netrelief.com/cookbooks/b..._reviews.shtml

Do any use and rely on any of these? I know this subject has been beaten
around a fair amount. However, I think this list may be of interest.

Ed


Ed, that list is from several years ago, BUTTthere are some good books
listed.
In the build your own pit section the pictures of my pits was from 12-14
years ago.
If you are new to Barbecue/grilling you might want to gat a copy of Gary
Wiviott's new book, Low &Slow, Master the art of barbecue in 5 easy
lessons.
It covers the use of WSM, offset and Weber Kettle cooking.
If you follow Gary's directions you will cook pretty good Q right out of
the Gate.
You might even see my name in it in a couple of placesG.
Big Jim in North Central Florida.

Big Jim, I just ordered "Low and Slow". Thanks very much for your
recommendation.
It looks like it's just what I need.

ed




Sqwertz 10-09-2009 10:20 AM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 
On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 13:42:20 -0400, Big Jim wrote:

If you are new to Barbecue/grilling you might want to gat a copy of Gary
Wiviott's new book, Low &Slow, Master the art of barbecue in 5 easy lessons.
It covers the use of WSM, offset and Weber Kettle cooking.
If you follow Gary's directions you will cook pretty good Q right out of
the Gate.


I expect to see Gary peddling his book on late night TV
infomercials. Event he reviews of his book on Amazon appear to be
staged.

I'm not to fond of his approach to BBQ, or the way he goes about
teaching it, to say the least. I've read the website. That's
enough for me.

Professor Wiviot? He must have pretty strong neck muscles to
support that head.

-sw

theron 30-09-2009 12:39 AM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 

"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in message
...
said:
On Sep 8, 11:29 am, "Nunya Bidnits" [email protected]
september.invalid wrote:
RegForte said:



Theron wrote:

Here's a list of BBQ cookbooks, almost all of which I haven't heard
of. Take a look at:
http://bbq.netrelief.com/cookbooks/b..._reviews.shtml

Do any use and rely on any of these? I know this subject has been
beaten around a fair amount. However, I think this list may be of
interest.

The Smoked-Foods Cookbook
by: Lue and Ed Park

Excellent book to broaden your knowledge of smoking beyond the
standard brisket n' butt category. I'm pretty sure this
was the book that helped me perfect various smoked nuts
recipes.

Smoke & Spice
by: Cheryl Alters Jamison & Bill Jamison

Overrated book, but it seems to have struck a chord with many
beginners. A surprising number of people treat this book as some
sort of bible. Too much emphasis on ingredients and not enough on
cooking technique.

License To Grill
by: Chris Schlesinger & John Willoughb

Excellent book. I recommend anything by Chris Schlesinger. His
skills go beyond the narrower subject of smoking/grilling to the
broader subject of how to cook properly meat of all kinds in all
ways.

Those are all excellent suggestions. I agree about Smoke and Spice.

Paul Kirk's Championship Barbecue is a fairly good book too.

MartyB in KC


I like some of Paul's books, too. Probably because if you actually
read the book, IF you can get over his ego, he is a very talented cook
that seems to improvise quite a bit. He isn't restrained by hard,
fast rules.


That's true about the ego. But what I like is that he approached every
competition season with a different concept and recipes to see if he could
not just come up with a winner, but with something unique that stood out
in
a crowd as well.

I think the days of being able to do that are way past over... it's gotten
much too inbred, at least where KCBS is concerned. I've started calling
them
the sauce and salad contests. Trouble is, you can't find a contest
sanctioned by anyone else in the KC region, for obvious reasons. They rule
the turf.

I have this one, and with some good recipes, it is also a very amusing
read. The guy just loves barbecue and the whole culture of the 'que
and competition.

"Peace, Love, & Barbecue: Recipes, Secrets, Tall Tales, and Outright
Lies from the Legends of Barbecue" by Mike Mills

You can find it for about $15 at Amazon, and cheaper still in the
second hand stores. As much as I like some of the bbq books out
there, I haven't ever had to pay full price for any of them.

Robert


Half Price Books rules! I've picked up wonderful deals there.

I've been collecting old Joy of Cooking editions. I picked up one, minus
the
dust jacket, but otherwise pristine, at HPB for five bucks... 1951
edition.
I'm trying not to mess it up. g

MartyB in KC

Wow! The "Joy of Cooking" is the first book I reach for still, when I don't
know what to do.

Ed





theron 30-09-2009 01:45 AM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 

"RockPyle" wrote in message
...
On Sep 7, 4:23 pm, RegForte wrote:


Smoke & Spice
by: Cheryl Alters Jamison & Bill Jamison

Overrated book, but it seems to have struck a chord with many beginners.
A surprising number of people treat this book as some sort of bible. Too
much emphasis on ingredients and not enough on cooking technique.


I agree with this comment. I am a beginner (perhaps just leaving
beginner stage) who bought this book and expected more discussion of
how-to rather than just a huge number of recipes.

On the good side, though, thumbing through this book shows the breadth
of smokable meats and preparation techniques. It openend my
imagination to what I can do with my smoker.

I am typically a cook who likes to read a number of recipes on a dish
and then pick and choose between them to see what the 'must haves' are
and what are variations among recipes, and then between wht I have in
the cupboard and what sounds good, come up with my plan. This is
where more commentary on the cooking technique is as valuable (if not
moreso) as the ingredients themselves.

I just smoked spareribs for the second time this weekend (cut them to
St. Louis style myself!) and am ready to start playing with some of
the sear first and then smoke recipes they have for tenderloin and
loin.

Rock


I'm going to try the following:
Take whole piece of midportion of tenderloin, or chateaubriand, 4-6 inches
long, depending on servings. I won't go less than the width of the
tenderloin. Trim off all fat and connective tissue, and salt and pepper.
Place longitudinally on upper rack of bullet smoker, and smoke at a very
low temp, 200F measured on the grate until the meat registers 110-115F in
the center by thermometer. Then sear at a very high temp. over hot charcoal
fire. I'm thnking about searing on the stove, deglazing following to make a
sauce you would combine wtih a bit of que sauce.

Ed






RockPyle 30-09-2009 01:34 PM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 
On Sep 10, 5:20*am, Sqwertz wrote:
On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 13:42:20 -0400, Big Jim wrote:
* If you are new to Barbecue/grilling you might want to gat a copy of Gary
Wiviott's new book, Low &Slow, Master the art of barbecue in 5 easy lessons.
* It covers the use of WSM, offset and Weber Kettle cooking.
* If you follow Gary's directions you will cook pretty good Q right out of
the Gate.


I expect to see Gary peddling his book on late night TV
infomercials. *Event he reviews of his book on Amazon appear to be
staged.

I'm not to fond of his approach to BBQ, or the way he goes about
teaching it, to say the least. *I've read the website. *That's
enough for me.

Professor Wiviot? *He must have pretty strong neck muscles to
support that head.

-sw


I ordered and received the book. I've not tried any of the recipes,
but skimming through the book, the tone is very off-putting. Follow
these steps, don't deviate from them, don't use any other available
information, and you will see the light.

Almost like a cult.

That being said, his progression from short to longer smokes and focus
on feeling the fire and understanding done-ness through your senses
rather than just measurements seems like a good addition/alternative
to a more mechanical and time/temperature regime.

I will be trying the marinated chicken recipe soon!

I think the book will be a good addition to the shelf, but certainly
will not have me throwing away all my other books and severing my
connection to the internet!

Rock

Duwop[_2_] 30-09-2009 02:33 PM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 
On Sep 29, 5:45*pm, "Theron" wrote:

I agree with this comment. *I am a beginner (perhaps just leaving
beginner stage) who bought this book and expected more discussion of
how-to rather than just a huge number of recipes.


After 10 or so years and all those questions? That's just plain ole
sad.


RockPyle 30-09-2009 09:29 PM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 
On Sep 30, 9:33*am, Duwop wrote:
On Sep 29, 5:45*pm, "Theron" wrote:

I agree with this comment. *I am a beginner (perhaps just leaving
beginner stage) who bought this book and expected more discussion of
how-to rather than just a huge number of recipes.


After 10 or so years and all those questions? That's just plain ole
sad.


That was me, Duwop.

Theron/Kent/etc. didn't properly attribute the quote.

Rock (really a mostly-beginner)

Brick[_3_] 01-10-2009 01:06 AM

Barbecue Cookbooks
 

On 30-Sep-2009, RockPyle wrote:

On Sep 30, 9:33*am, Duwop wrote:
On Sep 29, 5:45*pm, "Theron" wrote:

I agree with this comment. *I am a beginner (perhaps just leaving
beginner stage) who bought this book and expected more discussion of
how-to rather than just a huge number of recipes.


After 10 or so years and all those questions? That's just plain ole
sad.


That was me, Duwop.

Theron/Kent/etc. didn't properly attribute the quote.

Rock (really a mostly-beginner)


Rock,

What nobody and least of all the FAQ tells you is, "KISS"
"Keep It Simple Stupid". That means, "Don't mess with
rubs. Don't mess with marinades. Don't mess with temps.

Pick a product, be it pork, beef or fowl. Learn how to cook
it to the right degree of done. (Only you know what the right
degree of done is). Only when you can repeat the basics
everytime should you experiment.

When you start your pit it'll get hot pretty quick.When you
put the meat in, it'll drop way off. Surprise, surprise. don't
adjust anything. That cold meat drug the temp down. Let
the pit catch up. Don't get antsy. It'll take an hour or two
depending on how much meat you put in there. If you
keep messing with the draft, you just mess up your fire.
It was already running the way it shoud. Leave it alone.

--
Brick (It took me three years to learn that)


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