Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 08-09-2009, 05:50 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Bobby Flay and barbeque


"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in
message ...

Gilbert-Robinson and it's subsequent iterations have strayed far
from what
made them famous and successful.

Do you happen to remember the origin of the Gilbert side of that
company?
Joe Gilbert's at the old downtown airport, one of the best
restaurants
ever... Gilbert was a consummate restarauteur and front man...
greeted and
seated almost every customer himself. I was a kid in it's heyday
but my Dad
would take the family there frequently. Eventually it was scaled
back into a
more quick diner type of eatery as air travel began to change
from a
positive, genteel, and somewhat luxurious experience into just
another form
of mass transportation.


I'm sure we ate there, since Dad would usually go to the airport
on trips to KC just to see the planes. There was something about a
Connie that fascinated all of us. I recall the name as well, but
didn't make the association. Do you recall the time a baggage
cart was clipped by a spinning prop? The prop came off and flew
clear across the road, embedding itself in the hotel across from
the airport. That was about the time we were departing KC.

GR was best known to me as the folk operating the 3-4 restaurants
on the top of Commerce Tower. I don't even recall the names of
the places, but there was a formal steakhouse-type place and a
couple more. On the day after I accepted a job offer that would
take me from KC, a couple friends from a life company in KC took
me there to lunch (Top of the Tower?). We had steaks and I asked
for A1 sauce. I shook the bottle well before pouring some on the
side of my plate. There was a lot of murmering behind me and I
turned to see that I'd sprayed 2-3 tables with A1 sauce: the lid
was off.

Years and years later, I ran across one of those friends during a
trip to Higginsville and he recalled the event to my wife, kids
and a relative dining with us. grin

BTW, on the Flay throwdown in Raleigh, I wonder how the fellow got
away with having a downtown restaurant that cooked over wood
coals. I wonder if he has to use a catalytic converter, water
spray or some other technology to keep from "polluting" the air in
the downtown with the smoke.

--
Nonny

Our nation should be more like Illinois
and limit all politicians to just TWO terms:
One in office and the second in prison.



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Old 08-09-2009, 10:43 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 09:50:12 -0700, "Nonny" wrote:




I'm sure we ate there, since Dad would usually go to the airport
on trips to KC just to see the planes. There was something about a
Connie that fascinated all of us.


Sorry I can't contribute to the topic but my eye caught the "Connie"
thing and I can say something about the Connie.
In 1957 I flew from Dallas NAS to San Diego NAS in one. I was the
*only* passenger on board. It seats 88 iirc. What a ride!
Why alone? I was hitchhiking back from leave and caught the Connie
MATS flight out as it was the first available WB plane. It had just
had some type of maintenance done to it, new engines I believe.
Eddie
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Old 09-09-2009, 02:50 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On 8-Sep-2009, Eddie wrote:

On Tue, 8 Sep 2009 09:50:12 -0700, "Nonny" wrote:




I'm sure we ate there, since Dad would usually go to the airport
on trips to KC just to see the planes. There was something about a
Connie that fascinated all of us.


Sorry I can't contribute to the topic but my eye caught the "Connie"
thing and I can say something about the Connie.
In 1957 I flew from Dallas NAS to San Diego NAS in one. I was the
*only* passenger on board. It seats 88 iirc. What a ride!
Why alone? I was hitchhiking back from leave and caught the Connie
MATS flight out as it was the first available WB plane. It had just
had some type of maintenance done to it, new engines I believe.
Eddie


Talk about OT. But, as long as we're all reminiscing, I flew on the
Columbine once. That was Harry S. Truman's Air Force 1 back in
the day. After retirement as Air Force 1, it was assigned to the State
of Tennessee for the use of the Governor. I got to ride on it from
Washington D.C. to Maryville, TN at the end of an Air Force
NCO academy field trip. Great airplane and of course this one
was a particularly plush ride complete with swivel cocktail seats
and full bar service.

--
Brick (Youth is wasted on young people)
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Old 09-09-2009, 07:53 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Nunya Bidnits" wrote in
message -

One thing that is immediately apparent is how small they are
compared to
most commercial aircraft today.

As a kid, they looked huge.


One of the thrills as a kid eating in Joe Gilberts was the
Connies pulling
up practically to the window at eye level, as they loaded on
food from the
restaurant. In those days, you got good food on a plane!

I don't remember a lot about that era of air travel because I
was pretty
young, but I do recall developing a preference for riding in a
Connie over a
DC3... not just because it was so much cooler to look at, but
because the
wings of a DC3 tended to flap in a very disturbing manner.


I was a grade schooler in the mid 50's. In the 4th grade, there
was a family emergency with some relatives in PA, so we flew TWA
out of KC on a Connie. It was my first ride in any airplane, and
since I was fascinated with a Connie anyway, it was quite
memorable. There were white cloths on the seatbacks and the very
well dressed stewardesses would make hot chocolate for kids, on
request. Eating on the plane was beyond words for its 'coolness.'

Nowadays, a flight on a plane is about as exciting (hopefully) as
driving to the grocery store, but back then it was quite an
adventure.

--
Nonny

The best part of the Cash for Clunkers
program is that it's taken many of the
Obama bumper stickers off the road.




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Old 10-09-2009, 02:33 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Nonny" wrote in message
Nowadays, a flight on a plane is about as exciting (hopefully) as driving
to the grocery store, but back then it was quite an adventure.


You probably wore your Sunday best too.




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Old 10-09-2009, 04:21 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Ed Pawlowski" wrote in message
...

"Nonny" wrote in message
Nowadays, a flight on a plane is about as exciting (hopefully)
as driving to the grocery store, but back then it was quite an
adventure.


You probably wore your Sunday best too.


Yes, back then going on a flight meant dressing up, as did going
out for a nice dinner or play. Nowadays, here in Las Vegas, you
can wear torn jeans and a tee to about any of the plays and most
restaurants.

--
Nonny

Orwell called it “Thinkspeak” in his
classic novel, “1984.” Today, the same
control of speech and thought is called
being Politically Correct.




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Old 18-09-2009, 12:17 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Sep 6, 8:41*pm, "Nonny" wrote:
I was channel surfing the other day when Flay was having a
throwdown with a fellow from Raleigh NC. *I never saw how it
ended, but the NC guy sure sounded like he knew his business. *We
lived there *for years, and since I'd not heard of him or his
place, it must have opened after we departed.

Anyway, the one portion of the show I saw that bothered me was
Bobby's depiction of NC with a line through it separating it into
Eastern style and Lexington style. *When he described the Eastern
style, it looked like they were brushing the vinegar based mop
onto ribs. *That sure isn't how I did them and not how I'm used to
seeing them. *Also, when he described the Western style (called
Lexington style), he spoke of a sweet sauce, aka KC style. *Again
that isn't the way I recollect Lexington style to be.

The times I have Lexington style barbecue, I didn't enjoy it. *The
ribs I had that were supposed to be so good were essentially ribs
that were cut up individually or in small groups and literally
cooked in a pot with a tomato soup-like sauce. *Jeez- if I'd
served that to my family I'd have been slapped into a cheap
nursing home before I was even retired.

Can someone "in the know" please comment about 1) do you put the
spicy vinegar on ribs? and 2) what is Lexington style barbecue? *I
have my own opinions, but want to hear from others.

--
Nonny

Our nation should be more like Illinois
and limit all politicians to just TWO terms:
One in office and the second in prison.


Flay like doesn't know WTF OK.
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Old 18-09-2009, 01:29 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Bent Attorney Esq. wrote:

Flay like doesn't know WTF OK.


BooBoo,
You're really not very good at this, are you?
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Old 20-09-2009, 07:47 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"Nonny" wrote in message
...
I was channel surfing the other day when Flay was having a throwdown with a
fellow from Raleigh NC. I never saw how it ended, but the NC guy sure
sounded like he knew his business. We lived there for years, and since
I'd not heard of him or his place, it must have opened after we departed.

Anyway, the one portion of the show I saw that bothered me was Bobby's
depiction of NC with a line through it separating it into Eastern style
and Lexington style. When he described the Eastern style, it looked like
they were brushing the vinegar based mop onto ribs. That sure isn't how I
did them and not how I'm used to seeing them. Also, when he described the
Western style (called Lexington style), he spoke of a sweet sauce, aka KC
style. Again that isn't the way I recollect Lexington style to be.

The times I have Lexington style barbecue, I didn't enjoy it. The ribs I
had that were supposed to be so good were essentially ribs that were cut
up individually or in small groups and literally cooked in a pot with a
tomato soup-like sauce. Jeez- if I'd served that to my family I'd have
been slapped into a cheap nursing home before I was even retired.

Can someone "in the know" please comment about 1) do you put the spicy
vinegar on ribs? and 2) what is Lexington style barbecue? I have my own
opinions, but want to hear from others.

--
Nonny

Our nation should be more like Illinois
and limit all politicians to just TWO terms:
One in office and the second in prison.



Bobby Flay is an over hyped cable TV phenomenon who is a waste of time to
watch.

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Old 21-09-2009, 02:17 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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piedmont wrote:

Bobby Flay is an over hyped cable TV phenomenon who is a waste of
time to watch.


I think that Flay is a very talented chef, and he has the chops behind him
in terms of his successful restaurants and menus. I agree that he is lacking
in bbq knowledge, but that doesn't take away from his overall
accomplishments.

--
Dave
What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan




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Old 30-09-2009, 02:40 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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"piedmont" wrote in message
...
"Nonny" wrote in message
...


snipped

Bobby Flay is an over hyped cable TV phenomenon who is a waste of time to
watch.


I am not a fan of Flay;however, he is damned good at what he does. The
thing that irks me the most about him is his penchant for having to put
chilies in everything. Watch him on Iron Chef and you see how much talent
he has.

David




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