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Guv Bob 14-09-2007 05:00 AM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
OK, who's got the best homemade BBQ cooker and how dew yew make one?

Guv Bob


low-n-slow 14-09-2007 12:33 PM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
Oh, you mean the kind that sits on a flat-bed trailer and costs
somewhere between ten and fifteen thousand dollars?

Yeah, wish I had one of those too. For most of us the problem is not
finding a manufacturer but coming up with that kinda money :)

low-n-slow


the warlock society 14-09-2007 08:56 PM

Making a real BBQ rig
 

Guv Bob wrote:
OK, who's got the best homemade BBQ cooker and how dew yew make one?

Guv Bob


Hey bob

here's a link on how to make your own trash can smoker:

http://www.cruftbox.com/cruft/docs/elecsmoker.html

To be honest with you though; for the same price you can just by an
entry-level smoker:

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?actio...0-K&lpage=none

I wanted to make my own as well but when I realized it was cheaper to
just buy the electric smoker that had everything I wanted in it
anyways; that's what i did.

Either way, happy smoking!


Nonnymus[_5_] 14-09-2007 09:38 PM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
low-n-slow wrote:
Oh, you mean the kind that sits on a flat-bed trailer and costs
somewhere between ten and fifteen thousand dollars?

low-n-slow

I'm not sure if it has to be the semi truck variety to count, but if
you're after results and not just the art of low and slow, the boys in
Pennsylvania can help you. http://www.pitminder.com/

My guess is that their equipment can be scaled up to commercial size
with no effort. I don't pretend to have the skill of the commercial
folk who post here, or even the more dedicated folk. However, as I've
gotten older, I just don't get as much of a kick tending the smoker as I
did years back. Nowadays, the fun for me is the results more than
saying I did it all. The Pit Minder variation on their web site simply
uses outside air to moderate the hood temperature during a smoke and to
further adjust the hood temperature lower as the meat reaches the
desired temperature.

For the charcoal/coal/wood or even gas folks, that's done using a fan
whose volume is controlled by a computer, for better want of a word.

When you cut to the chase, the barbecue we all love is a product of the
marinade, rub, mop and sauce, combined with the smoke and cooking
temperature profile. It's the last item that can go from being fun to a
pain in the rump with age and arthritis.grin The skilled barbecuer,
either commercial or recreational, adjusts the fire level to get the
hood temperature he thinks is appropriate for the meat. Rather than
manually adjust a damper or run a thermostat up and down, why not lay it
all out on paper and let a computer do it for you while you sit back and
have a drink?

When I used to do construction, I used a 22oz Estwing to drive 16d box
nails. Later, I got the same results with a Paslode pneumatic nailer. I
also used an electric planer to join wood instead of a 16" joining
plane, spray finish rather than brush, use a Lawn Boy for the yard
instead of a push mower and have a TIMER to sprinkle the lawn instead of
using a garden hose. Sure, I could go around in the evening and cut on
my porch and yard lights at switches, but I prefer to use X-10 controls
to do it for me. . . and also cut them off.

I don't feel that we lose a thing by increasingly automating cooking,
including our venerated barbecue. I love it as much as the next man,
but don't think I give up a thing when I let a silicone chip control
some of the factors I've done over the course of an evening, afternoon
or even nighttime, in the past. It's still ME setting the parameters-
the question is whether it's me manually making the adjustments or
something doing it for me while I nap or have a martini.

--
---Nonnymus---
You donít stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.

Bob 14-09-2007 11:30 PM

Making a real BBQ rig
 

I wanted to make my own as well but when I realized it was cheaper
to
just buy the electric smoker that had everything I wanted in it
anyways; that's what i did.

An electric smoker? Egads, what will they think of next? I guess
those electrons give everything a nice electric flavor.

You call that barbeque or smoking?
Not me.
Bob-tx



Zz Yzx 15-09-2007 08:21 PM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
My Dad.

When I was a kid (c. late 1950's early 1960's), my Dad made a smoker
out of an old refrigerator. At that time, refrigerators were made of
steel w/ porcelin coatings. He took the compressor and motor and
other stuff out of the bottom comparment, and rigged a firebox in it.
He drilled holes in the floor of the icebox, and rigged a vent on top,
complete with a butterfly valve to control heat. He used the metal
racks that came with the refrigerator.

Then, he'd go deep sea fishing, and catch albacore, yellowtail,
bonita,salmon, etc., make me clean them and bury the guts, brine it
all, and smoke them for a day or two.

Good eats.

-Zz

On Fri, 14 Sep 2007 04:00:01 GMT, "Guv Bob"
wrote:

OK, who's got the best homemade BBQ cooker and how dew yew make one?

Guv Bob


Guv Bob 16-09-2007 12:13 AM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
Just the home backyard type.... big enough for 4 people is fine.

"Nonnymus" wrote in message ...
low-n-slow wrote:
Oh, you mean the kind that sits on a flat-bed trailer and costs
somewhere between ten and fifteen thousand dollars?

low-n-slow

I'm not sure if it has to be the semi truck variety to count, but if
you're after results and not just the art of low and slow, the boys in
Pennsylvania can help you. http://www.pitminder.com/

My guess is that their equipment can be scaled up to commercial size
with no effort. I don't pretend to have the skill of the commercial
folk who post here, or even the more dedicated folk. However, as I've
gotten older, I just don't get as much of a kick tending the smoker as I
did years back. Nowadays, the fun for me is the results more than
saying I did it all. The Pit Minder variation on their web site simply
uses outside air to moderate the hood temperature during a smoke and to
further adjust the hood temperature lower as the meat reaches the
desired temperature.

For the charcoal/coal/wood or even gas folks, that's done using a fan
whose volume is controlled by a computer, for better want of a word.

When you cut to the chase, the barbecue we all love is a product of the
marinade, rub, mop and sauce, combined with the smoke and cooking
temperature profile. It's the last item that can go from being fun to a
pain in the rump with age and arthritis.grin The skilled barbecuer,
either commercial or recreational, adjusts the fire level to get the
hood temperature he thinks is appropriate for the meat. Rather than
manually adjust a damper or run a thermostat up and down, why not lay it
all out on paper and let a computer do it for you while you sit back and
have a drink?

When I used to do construction, I used a 22oz Estwing to drive 16d box
nails. Later, I got the same results with a Paslode pneumatic nailer. I
also used an electric planer to join wood instead of a 16" joining
plane, spray finish rather than brush, use a Lawn Boy for the yard
instead of a push mower and have a TIMER to sprinkle the lawn instead of
using a garden hose. Sure, I could go around in the evening and cut on
my porch and yard lights at switches, but I prefer to use X-10 controls
to do it for me. . . and also cut them off.

I don't feel that we lose a thing by increasingly automating cooking,
including our venerated barbecue. I love it as much as the next man,
but don't think I give up a thing when I let a silicone chip control
some of the factors I've done over the course of an evening, afternoon
or even nighttime, in the past. It's still ME setting the parameters-
the question is whether it's me manually making the adjustments or
something doing it for me while I nap or have a martini.

--
---Nonnymus---
You donít stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.


Nonnymus[_5_] 16-09-2007 01:00 AM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
Zz Yzx wrote:
My Dad.

When I was a kid (c. late 1950's early 1960's), my Dad made a smoker
out of an old refrigerator. At that time, refrigerators were made of
steel w/ porcelin coatings. He took the compressor and motor and
other stuff out of the bottom comparment, and rigged a firebox in it.
He drilled holes in the floor of the icebox, and rigged a vent on top,
complete with a butterfly valve to control heat. He used the metal
racks that came with the refrigerator.

Then, he'd go deep sea fishing, and catch albacore, yellowtail,
bonita,salmon, etc., make me clean them and bury the guts, brine it
all, and smoke them for a day or two.


As a FWIW, Bradley's smoker consists of two main parts. One is the dorm
room refrigerator-sized smoker box, and the other is the smoke
generator, which holds and feeds the pucks onto a hotplate. The smoke
generator merely slides into a hole in the side of the box, hanging off
of two mounting screws. The biscuits are fed one at a time onto the hot
plate by a "pusher," that slides the old one onto the plate, forcing the
used one to drop into a small pan of water.

Bradley sells the smoke generator separately for someone like your Dad
who wants to use a refrigerator, old barbecue grill or anything else for
smoking food. It's the same generator and hot plate as sold with their
smoker, except that the hot plate has a small, removable, cover that
sits over the puck in case your own design might permit something to
drip onto the puck.

Nonny
--
---Nonnymus---
You donít stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.

Nonnymus[_5_] 16-09-2007 01:03 AM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
Guv Bob wrote:
Just the home backyard type.... big enough for 4 people is fine.


Look at the new thread about the fellow whose dad used an old
refrigerator as a smoker. Perhaps if you coupled that with my reply to
him you could have some fun.

Nonny


--
---Nonnymus---
You donít stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.



--
---Nonnymus---
You donít stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.

Guv Bob 16-09-2007 01:39 AM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
mmmmmm MMMMM!!!! This is making me HONGRY!! :OD

Some of the folks at work talk about what a "real" bbq is. One says that the meat is not cooked over fire or coals, that it's off to the side and has the smoke funnels across it. I never heard that anywhere else - thought BBQ was always done over coals or a wood fire (pronounced far).

Guv Bob


Nonnymus[_5_] 16-09-2007 04:27 AM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
Guv Bob wrote:
mmmmmm MMMMM!!!! This is making me HONGRY!! :OD

Some of the folks at work talk about what a "real" bbq is. One says that the meat is not cooked over fire or coals, that it's off to the side and has the smoke funnels across it. I never heard that anywhere else - thought BBQ was always done over coals or a wood fire (pronounced far).

Guv Bob


My neighbor brought over a big container of pulled pork loin that he'd
cooked up in his electric oven overnight. My mild criticism of him is
that he overcooks meat. Outside of that, the loin was delicious when
mixed with KC Masterpiece and eaten on a hot dog bun. I compared it
side to side with smoked pulled butt and the butt won hand's down.
However, his loin/KC Masterpiece makes a good breakfast sandwich that
I've enjoyed for the past three mornings, now.

The guy also likes to do a loin in a crock pot, and the result is
edible, also. We all have our favorite and less favorite foods. I sure
as heck never turn down the good food he brings over, but then he
doesn't turn down mine, either. grin

Nonny
--
---Nonnymus---
You don√ā¬ít stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.



Big Jim 16-09-2007 01:30 PM

Making a real BBQ rig
 

"Guv Bob" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
mmmmmm MMMMM!!!! This is making me HONGRY!! :OD

Some of the folks at work talk about what a "real" bbq is. One says that
the meat is not cooked over fire or coals, that it's off to the side and has
the smoke funnels across it. I never heard that anywhere else - thought BBQ
was always done over coals or a wood fire (pronounced far).

Guv Bob


Texans call that BBQ.The rest of the country mostly don't.
That is what I call "smoke cooking". Barbecue is cooked over hardwood coals
at a distance of 18" - 24" or more.
BTW, my pits smoke cook
--
James A. "Big Jim" Whitten

www.lazyq.com



Edwin Pawlowski 16-09-2007 04:36 PM

Making a real BBQ rig
 

"Big Jim" wrote in message
...

"Guv Bob" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
mmmmmm MMMMM!!!! This is making me HONGRY!! :OD

Some of the folks at work talk about what a "real" bbq is. One says that
the meat is not cooked over fire or coals, that it's off to the side and
has the smoke funnels across it. I never heard that anywhere else -
thought BBQ was always done over coals or a wood fire (pronounced far).

Guv Bob


Barbecue has evolved over hundreds of years. Some is cooked direct, others
indirect. Texas barbecue changed when the oil rigs came along. Large pieces
of pipe were left in the fields and someone decided to make an offset
cooker.

In direct cookers, the grate for grilling is inches over the coals, but to
make barbecue the grate is much higher, maybe 18" or more. Each has good
and bad points and you can get into ****ing contests quite easily if you
know for a fact that your method is the only true barbecue.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



the warlock society 17-09-2007 07:03 PM

Making a real BBQ rig
 

Bob wrote:
I wanted to make my own as well but when I realized it was cheaper
to
just buy the electric smoker that had everything I wanted in it
anyways; that's what i did.

An electric smoker? Egads, what will they think of next? I guess
those electrons give everything a nice electric flavor.

You call that barbeque or smoking?
Not me.
Bob-tx


Hi Bob

sorry im not a dimwitted redneck who can afford to spend 15 hours
babysitting a woodsmoker... clearly your self worth is quantified by
the amount of time you spend sitting in front of your "real" smoker; a
fairly pathetic assertation if you ask me.

but who am i to judge?


Default User 17-09-2007 07:35 PM

Making a real BBQ rig
 
the warlock society wrote:


Bob wrote:
I wanted to make my own as well but when I realized it was cheaper
to
just buy the electric smoker that had everything I wanted in it
anyways; that's what i did.

An electric smoker? Egads, what will they think of next? I guess
those electrons give everything a nice electric flavor.

You call that barbeque or smoking?



sorry im not a dimwitted redneck who can afford to spend 15 hours
babysitting a woodsmoker... clearly your self worth is quantified by
the amount of time you spend sitting in front of your "real" smoker; a
fairly pathetic assertation if you ask me.


This is what's known as a false dilemma. "Real" barbecue rigs don't
require constant attention, at least not charcoal-based ones. A WSM
using the Minion Method requires little attention beyond an occasional
check to replenish smoke wood in the early going, and the overall temps
at intervals.



Brian

--
If televison's a babysitter, the Internet is a drunk librarian who
won't shut up.
-- Dorothy Gambrell (http://catandgirl.com)


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