Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 21-09-2007, 01:05 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making a real BBQ rig

On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 17:17:20 -0700, Denny Wheeler
wrote:

On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 10:44:34 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:

vex wrote:
Brick wrote:
I was a newbie 4 years ago. I'm still here. I'm sure there's some
wish I wasn't.


I was a newbie right now. (heh)

Dave's advice, along with others, have helped me out quite a bit.


Dang, Brett, and your still here!!!?? I'm falling down on the job :-)


So'm I--even after the trauma of meeting you in Real Life (tm).

-denny-


Did he feed you, Denny?

Harry

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Old 21-09-2007, 01:08 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making a real BBQ rig

On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 17:57:12 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:

Denny Wheeler wrote:
On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 10:47:17 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:

Brick wrote:

I was a newbie 4 years ago. I'm still here. I'm sure there's some
wish I wasn't.

But then who'd be the afb curmudgoen?


denny raises his hand, and switches to one of his most-used sig
files

-Denny-
the curmudgeonly editor


Maybe we should start a Curmudgeon Committee. It could be a sub-committee of
the Cabal.


TINC, Dave

Harry

Who will be Treasurer and collect the fees.
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Old 21-09-2007, 01:11 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 09:28:36 -0700, the warlock society
wrote:


Dave Bugg wrote:
Fed Up wrote:
"Dave Bugg" This is an unmoderated ng in which
highly skilled bbq enthusiasts make up
the majority of subscribers. Everything you write IS everyone's
business and, as such, open to criticism or comment. There will be
strong disagreements, chiding, and corrections to bad information.
If that is disagreeable to you, feel free to leave...... cool?


You know Dave you've probably driven more newbies off this NG than
anybody with your unrelenting "purist" bullshit and I find that quite
ironic since you yourself use a gas fired pit and and call your
product "authentic bbq"


Ah, the predictable anonymous leg-humper pops up yet again; too much of a
coward to post under its real name.

I don't preach 'purist' anything. I preach excellence. You have always been
consistent in defending the lowest-common mediocre denominator. My main pit
has a gas-fired log lighter to get logs started, and goes through about a
cord of fruitwood a week. I also use a Cookshack electric powered pit. My
log burner puts out a better product with pork shoulders, butts and brisket
than the Cookshack, so I limit the Cookshack to ribs and chicken when and if
my log-burner is full. So much for the insult.

Your other comment regarding newbies is meaningless sniping from a
know-nothing.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


you preach because you know you're a ****ing piece of shit loser who
contributes little to society other than making fun of other people
for not having the elite bbq skills you do...

you rant out of sheer insecurity; I never provoked you or asked you a
****ing thing. You just waddled your fat, inbred, backwoods ass into
my conversation for no other reason than to satisfy your pathetic,
dimwitted little ego.


Plonk!


Harry
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Old 21-09-2007, 01:26 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Making a real BBQ rig

Harry Demidavicius wrote:
On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 17:57:12 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:

Denny Wheeler wrote:
On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 10:47:17 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:

Brick wrote:

I was a newbie 4 years ago. I'm still here. I'm sure there's some
wish I wasn't.

But then who'd be the afb curmudgoen?

denny raises his hand, and switches to one of his most-used sig
files

-Denny-
the curmudgeonly editor


Maybe we should start a Curmudgeon Committee. It could be a
sub-committee of the Cabal.


TINC, Dave

Harry

Who will be Treasurer and collect the fees.


With the way the dollar's headed, you'd better ask for Canadian currency :-)

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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Old 21-09-2007, 01:31 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 11:33:19 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:

Nonnymus wrote:
Dave Bugg wrote:
Nonnymus wrote:
Dave Bugg wrote:

I spent three months running trials to see if I could dial the
Cookshack in to reproduce the taste, texture, and tenderness of my
Ole Hickory. I never could get brisket or pork butts/shoulders to
taste as good. It does do chickens real well, and it does OK for
ribs in a pinch. It also make a superb holding oven.

How does the meat your Bradley produces compare in taste to your combustion
smoker? I think Harry D. has a Bradley now, and since he has a long history
using Kamados, I'd be interested to hear his comparison as well.


Apples and oranges, Dave. The Bradley is a one trick pony in my
stable. I've only done fish so far - Copper River Salmon [sockeye
this time] and trout. Both have turned out superbly. And Drop-dead
easy.

The K's will grill [#3] or slow cook [#7] or can go to blast furnace
range. I cannot tell you at this time how a brisket will taste from
the Bradley - but will report in. I like all my Cookers.

I haven't gone there yet, but don't think Bradley can rise above much
250. My Seattle friend has done great Leg-of-Lambs [Legs of Lamb/Legs
of Lambs] and swears by them. We'll be there for US Thanksgiving and
I expect he will demo this.

Harry


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Old 21-09-2007, 02:17 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Harry Demidavicius wrote:

On Tue, 18 Sep 2007 11:33:19 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:


How does the meat your Bradley produces compare in taste to your
combustion smoker? I think Harry D. has a Bradley now, and since he
has a long history using Kamados, I'd be interested to hear his
comparison as well.


Apples and oranges, Dave. The Bradley is a one trick pony in my
stable. I've only done fish so far - Copper River Salmon [sockeye
this time] and trout. Both have turned out superbly. And Drop-dead
easy.

The K's will grill [#3] or slow cook [#7] or can go to blast furnace
range. I cannot tell you at this time how a brisket will taste from
the Bradley - but will report in. I like all my Cookers.

I haven't gone there yet, but don't think Bradley can rise above much
250. My Seattle friend has done great Leg-of-Lambs [Legs of Lamb/Legs
of Lambs] and swears by them. We'll be there for US Thanksgiving and
I expect he will demo this.


That would be a great opportunity for a photo series.

--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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Old 21-09-2007, 03:48 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On 19-Sep-2007, Nonnymus wrote:

Brick wrote:

For stuff that's been refrigerated or even frozen, I use the vacuum bag
and boiling water process a lot and the nuker the rest of the time. I
don't have to worry about cheating my customer. She doesn't want to
do the cooking.


Let me second that, Brick. The only trick I learned was to let the
pulled pork or ribs cool down before vacuum bagging. That congeals the
juice and the vacuum doesn't pull it out the opening of the bag before
it seals. When I've not done that, I end up with a bad seal and also a
mess in the Foodsaver.


As "Tricky Dick" used to say, "Let me just say this about that". My
snorkel sealer has the same problem. In some cases (let your imagin-
ation be your guide) I can use a folded knapkin as a filter to get by.
Mostly I do liike you do. In some cases, I bag termporarily with a
clothes pin closure and pop the bags in the freezer until they get
good and frozen. Then I vacuum them down tight with no problem.

I prefer the boiling pan of water over the
microwave, but don't know why. Perhaps it's that the microwave can
overheat the fatty areas more, causing more cooking where the pan of
boiling water won't.


I do both, but the nuker gets its only points because it's so easy. The
boiler wins the quality test hands down at my house.

Also, I produce quite a bit of hard bark in my pit. I always chop and mix
the bark into the meat, but I think I prefer the texture after it has been
reheated. In the case of ribs, particularly beef back ribs, the boiling bag
routine prduces a very palatable product while salvaging all of the original
juices.

I cook for the environment in which I live. Meal preparation is a serious
business for me. I'll never be the equivalent of the TV "Soccer Mom". I
just don't have enough hands to go around. I have to get serious mileage
out of every real cooking episode with the objective of putting gobs of
"planned overs" into the refrigerator and/or freezer. My typical meal is
kind of a "Sandra Lee" type of thing with some fresh and some left-
over.

Today was not atypical. I put out about seven courses for lunch with
only one freshly cooked item. That was a 6oz piece of "Eye of Round"
which I braised for 45 minutes with onions and garlic. The rest was a
motly bunch including, steamed cabbage, boiled potatoes, carrots,
macaroni salad, cole slaw, pork roulade and chorizo hash. There was
fresh iceberg lettuce and sliced tomato for salad.

Oh yeh, there was brown gravy made from the remains of the eye of
round. I seasoned and thickened the braising liquid and called it gravy.

I was surprised to see Nathalie take seconds and even thirds on some
of the dishes.


--
---Nonnymus---


--
Brick(Save a tree, eat a Beaver)
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Old 22-09-2007, 08:09 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Harry Demidavicius wrote:


Apples and oranges, Dave. The Bradley is a one trick pony in my
stable. I've only done fish so far - Copper River Salmon [sockeye
this time] and trout. Both have turned out superbly. And Drop-dead
easy.

The K's will grill [#3] or slow cook [#7] or can go to blast furnace
range. I cannot tell you at this time how a brisket will taste from
the Bradley - but will report in. I like all my Cookers.

I haven't gone there yet, but don't think Bradley can rise above much
250. My Seattle friend has done great Leg-of-Lambs [Legs of Lamb/Legs
of Lambs] and swears by them. We'll be there for US Thanksgiving and
I expect he will demo this.

Harry


Harry, I agree with you that the Bradley is not an all-inclusive outdoor
cooker. What it does, it does with excellence and convenience. In my
backyard, I have three separate cookers- the Bradley for hot or cold
smoking, a 3-burner SS gas grill with wood tray for limited smoking and
an IR grill for char-rare cooking of steaks and finishing off some other
foods. The closest to a universal gadget is the 3- burner SS grill from
Sam's Club, but none of the three can do as much alone as can be done
with the three operating in their best field.

Nonny

--
---Nonnymus---
You donít stand any taller by
trying to make others appear shorter.
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Old 22-09-2007, 10:53 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Nonnymus wrote:

The closest to a
universal gadget is the 3- burner SS grill from Sam's Club, but none
of the three can do as much alone as can be done with the three
operating in their best field.


The ceramic kamado-style pits is actually pretty close to a swiss army knife
for outdoor cooking. I have both a Kamado #7 and a Weber Genesis on my back
porch, along with a heavy-duty two burner, extremely high btu, propane
camp-style stove.
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com


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Old 23-09-2007, 04:54 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 14:53:18 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:

Nonnymus wrote:

The closest to a
universal gadget is the 3- burner SS grill from Sam's Club, but none
of the three can do as much alone as can be done with the three
operating in their best field.


The ceramic kamado-style pits is actually pretty close to a swiss army knife
for outdoor cooking. I have both a Kamado #7 and a Weber Genesis on my back
porch, along with a heavy-duty two burner, extremely high btu, propane
camp-style stove.



It would be interesting to learn what some our fellow travelers have
sitting in their 'outdoor kitchens'.

Harry


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Old 23-09-2007, 01:05 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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On 22-Sep-2007, Harry Demidavicius wrote:

On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 14:53:18 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:

Nonnymus wrote:

The closest to a
universal gadget is the 3- burner SS grill from Sam's Club, but none
of the three can do as much alone as can be done with the three
operating in their best field.


The ceramic kamado-style pits is actually pretty close to a swiss army
knife
for outdoor cooking. I have both a Kamado #7 and a Weber Genesis on my
back
porch, along with a heavy-duty two burner, extremely high btu, propane
camp-style stove.



It would be interesting to learn what some our fellow travelers have
sitting in their 'outdoor kitchens'.

Harry


3 Burner SS Grill
NB Silver Smoker (16 X 28 offset)
Coleman Cookin' Machine, (16", 2 level, gas fired, bullet smoker)
--
Brick(Youth is wasted on young people)
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Old 23-09-2007, 02:05 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Outdoor Cooking equipment: was/ Making a real BBQ rig


"Harry Demidavicius" wrote in message
...
It would be interesting to learn what some our fellow travelers have
sitting in their 'outdoor kitchens'.

Harry


Something like this?

Stump's GF 222 CM
Stump's Smoker Tailgater (on order)(Is it here yet?)
#5 Kamado
#3 Kamado
#3 Kamado with Gas option
#1 Kamado
Mini Big Green Egg
Weber Smokey Mountain
Weber Smokey Joe, Homer Simpson model
Cast iron Hibachi, 2 grates
(any or all may or may not be Stoker controlled)
Cajun Cookin' Turkey Fryer
Coleman Propane stove
Coleman Hot Water

It's a disease, I tell you. I can't help it!

bob


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Old 23-09-2007, 02:19 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Outdoor Cooking equipment: was/ Making a real BBQ rig


" BOB" wrote in message
news

Stump's GF 222 CM

Currently has 2 butts cooking. Should be done around noon
Stump's Smoker Tailgater (on order)(Is it here yet?)

I'm still waiting
#5 Kamado

Cooked 2 briskets last weekend
#3 Kamado

Seared a few Rib Eyes last Tuesday and Wednesday
#3 Kamado with Gas option

Neighbor used it for 2 Spatchcocked chickens sometime this past week
#1 Kamado

Hmmm? It's time to fire this baby up again.
Mini Big Green Egg

This is a steak searing machine. Too bad it's too small for more than 1 or
2 at a time.
Weber Smokey Mountain

I'm still learning this puppy. It's my latest edition
Weber Smokey Joe, Homer Simpson model

Gets ignored too much. I think Homer steals half of the food, anyway.
Cast iron Hibachi, 2 grates

I should probably give this to some deserving soul. It hasn't been used in
years.
(any or all may or may not be Stoker controlled, except the Hibachi)

up to 4 at a time, 'til I get more fans and probes
Cajun Cookin' Turkey Fryer

Thanksgiving will give it a work out. Already have orders for 5 fried
turkeys, and 3 fried smoked turkeys.
Coleman Propane stove

Mostly used for breakfast or ungrilled side dishes
Coleman Hot Water

Great for clean up, or quickly boiling water...it's almost boiling from the
tap

It's a disease, I tell you. I can't help it!

Plus, I'm running out of room.

bob

oops


BOB


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Old 23-09-2007, 02:40 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Brick wrote:
On 22-Sep-2007, Harry Demidavicius wrote:

On Sat, 22 Sep 2007 14:53:18 -0700, "Dave Bugg"
wrote:

Nonnymus wrote:

The closest to a
universal gadget is the 3- burner SS grill from Sam's Club, but none
of the three can do as much alone as can be done with the three
operating in their best field.
The ceramic kamado-style pits is actually pretty close to a swiss army
knife
for outdoor cooking. I have both a Kamado #7 and a Weber Genesis on my
back
porch, along with a heavy-duty two burner, extremely high btu, propane
camp-style stove.


It would be interesting to learn what some our fellow travelers have
sitting in their 'outdoor kitchens'.



GOSM gas smoker, El cheapo gas grill (Whatever wallywirld has for
$150.00 every 3 years) and a Big Drum Smoker (Pirated copy)
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Old 23-09-2007, 02:42 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default Outdoor Cooking equipment: was/ Making a real BBQ rig

BOB wrote:
" BOB" wrote in message
news
Stump's GF 222 CM

Currently has 2 butts cooking. Should be done around noon
Stump's Smoker Tailgater (on order)(Is it here yet?)

I'm still waiting
#5 Kamado

Cooked 2 briskets last weekend
#3 Kamado

Seared a few Rib Eyes last Tuesday and Wednesday
#3 Kamado with Gas option

Neighbor used it for 2 Spatchcocked chickens sometime this past week
#1 Kamado

Hmmm? It's time to fire this baby up again.
Mini Big Green Egg

This is a steak searing machine. Too bad it's too small for more than 1 or
2 at a time.
Weber Smokey Mountain

I'm still learning this puppy. It's my latest edition
Weber Smokey Joe, Homer Simpson model

Gets ignored too much. I think Homer steals half of the food, anyway.
Cast iron Hibachi, 2 grates

I should probably give this to some deserving soul. It hasn't been used in
years.
(any or all may or may not be Stoker controlled, except the Hibachi)

up to 4 at a time, 'til I get more fans and probes
Cajun Cookin' Turkey Fryer

Thanksgiving will give it a work out. Already have orders for 5 fried
turkeys, and 3 fried smoked turkeys.
Coleman Propane stove

Mostly used for breakfast or ungrilled side dishes
Coleman Hot Water

Great for clean up, or quickly boiling water...it's almost boiling from the
tap
It's a disease, I tell you. I can't help it!

Plus, I'm running out of room.
bob

oops

BOB


I humbly bow in your presence.


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