Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 17-06-2007, 06:53 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
Abe Abe is offline
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Default East coast style Chinese pork ribs

I'm talking about those very red and smoky/sweet/sticky ribs. I know
some places use coloring to add the the redness, while others go for
real smoke for the coloring. That's not the issue as I'll be cooking
them over indirect heat in a 22" Weber kettle.

I'm reading conflicting information on how to spice/flavor them. Some
say to use five spice powder alone as a rub, then glaze a few times
with hoisin sauce in the last 30 min or so of cooking.

Other places say to add S&P with the five spice powder . Still other
places say don't use five spice at all, just S&P, and yet still others
say smoke them plain, and just do the glazing with hoisin at the end.

I am suspect of the S&P thing, because I never detected even a hint of
pepper (and we're talking black pepper here) on Chinese ribs, and they
never tasted even remotely salty.

So, what do people here say is the best way to acheive that "special"
taste.

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Old 17-06-2007, 06:57 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
Abe Abe is offline
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Default East coast style Chinese pork ribs

I'm talking about those very red and smoky/sweet/sticky ribs. I know
some places use coloring to add the the redness, while others go for
real smoke for the coloring. That's not the issue as I'll be cooking
them over indirect heat in a 22" Weber kettle.

I'm reading conflicting information on how to spice/flavor them. Some
say to use five spice powder alone as a rub, then glaze a few times
with hoisin sauce in the last 30 min or so of cooking.

Other places say to add S&P with the five spice powder . Still other
places say don't use five spice at all, just S&P, and yet still others
say smoke them plain, and just do the glazing with hoisin at the end.

I am suspect of the S&P thing, because I never detected even a hint of
pepper (and we're talking black pepper here) on Chinese ribs, and they
never tasted even remotely salty.

So, what do people here say is the best way to acheive that "special"
taste.


I forgot to say, I'll be cooking over good lump with cherry chunks.
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Old 17-06-2007, 10:14 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
Abe Abe is offline
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Default East coast style Chinese pork ribs

On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 10:53:12 -0700, Abe wrote:

I'm talking about those very red and smoky/sweet/sticky ribs. I know
some places use coloring to add the the redness, while others go for
real smoke for the coloring. That's not the issue as I'll be cooking
them over indirect heat in a 22" Weber kettle.

I'm reading conflicting information on how to spice/flavor them. Some
say to use five spice powder alone as a rub, then glaze a few times
with hoisin sauce in the last 30 min or so of cooking.

Other places say to add S&P with the five spice powder . Still other
places say don't use five spice at all, just S&P, and yet still others
say smoke them plain, and just do the glazing with hoisin at the end.

I am suspect of the S&P thing, because I never detected even a hint of
pepper (and we're talking black pepper here) on Chinese ribs, and they
never tasted even remotely salty.

So, what do people here say is the best way to acheive that "special"
taste.


Thanks for the suggestions guys.
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Old 17-06-2007, 10:17 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
Abe Abe is offline
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Posts: 115
Default East coast style Chinese pork ribs

So, what do people here say is the best way to acheive that "special"
taste.


Char Siu Sauce
http://bbq.about.com/od/barbecuesauc...r/ble10312.htm

Or buy the Lee Kum Kee version, which is kinda weak, IMO.

Chinese ribs are often fried in oil briefly after being roasted
to crisp up the coating. I've never seen a Chinese restaurant
actually smoke them. They're roasted cantonese-style.


Wow, fried in oil for crisping? I certainly won't do that, but
interesting to know nonetheless.


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