Barbecue (alt.food.barbecue) Discuss barbecue and grilling--southern style "low and slow" smoking of ribs, shoulders and briskets, as well as direct heat grilling of everything from burgers to salmon to vegetables.

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Old 17-04-2007, 06:51 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...

to cook? My thoughts, the grill. Sister in law bought 'em, and thinking of
frying them!

Anyway, in all honesty, I've never done a steak that thick on the grill,
kinda curious as to roughly how long for medium rare? Yeah, I know, it's
done when it's done. But on a gas grill, any thoughts as to an approx.
time? I figure I should be able to get real good grill marks on 'em.

Nothing outrageous in seasoning either... salt, pepper, garlic and onion
powder, probably about it.



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Old 17-04-2007, 07:16 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...

On Apr 17, 12:51 pm, "43fan" wrote:
to cook? My thoughts, the grill. Sister in law bought 'em, and thinking of
frying them!

Anyway, in all honesty, I've never done a steak that thick on the grill,
kinda curious as to roughly how long for medium rare? Yeah, I know, it's
done when it's done. But on a gas grill, any thoughts as to an approx.
time? I figure I should be able to get real good grill marks on 'em.

Nothing outrageous in seasoning either... salt, pepper, garlic and onion
powder, probably about it.


This works for me.
Preheat one side of the grill to 600° (hot). You should have a cooler
side, with minimal direct heat. Take the room temp steaks place on
hot side of the grill until it losens its grip on the grill, about
1-1/2 mins, rotate 45° (no flipping yet.)
Give it 2 more minutes, or until the blood begins to poke through the
top, whichever occurs first. Flip.

Repeat 1-1/2 minutes; rotate 45° (this creates nice grill marks),
another 1-1/2 minutes and place the steaks off to the cooler side of
the grill.

Allow to heat through until done, or until the blood just starts
coming to the top. Remove to a platter, and allow to rest for 5
minutes before cutting to allow the juices to redistribute thruout the
steaks. Have a beer. What can I bring?

Pierre




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Old 18-04-2007, 11:47 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...


"Denny Wheeler" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 13:51:28 -0400, "43fan"
wrote:

to cook? My thoughts, the grill. Sister in law bought 'em, and thinking
of
frying them!


While I pretty much agree with the 'grill' replies, I suspect your
s-i-l was thinking of pan-broiling, which is *not* frying. And one
can produce a very nicely cooked--and seared--thick steak by
pan-broiling. I know this, as my mother used to bring home 2"
porterhouse steaks now and then, and pan-broil 'em. In a
well-seasoned cast iron skillet.
(it kinda was the only available way to cook a steak for us at that
time)

-denny-


Well, I gotta say, they turned out pretty durn good. IMO, what she did was
actually "fry" them. *g* Didn't use a cast iron skillet, which I did
suggest, but she elected not to. Little bit of olive oil in the pan, very
hot, not sure how long she cooked on each side, my wife made me leave the
kitchen because she was afraid there'd be a fight! LOL Um, I did have to
stop her from putting the things in a 350 deg oven though! Whew.... Took
'em outta the pan, into a baking dish and tented 'em. Then she was gonna
put them in a 350deg oven to "keep 'em warm"... LOL Again, whew... glad I
yelled... WHOA WHOA WHOAAAAA from the living room on that one and the wife
stopped her.

Still think they'd have been better on the grill, but I certainly ate all of
mine.

Thanks for the replies.
--

The test of courage comes when we are in the minority.
The test of tolerance comes when we are in the majority.



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Old 18-04-2007, 05:07 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...

On Apr 18, 3:47 am, "43fan" wrote:

Still think they'd have been better on the grill, but I certainly ate all of
mine.


You're right, a grill can be better. You're timing will be very
dependant on your fuel source and how close it is to the cooking
grate.

I use oak lump and bring the grate up so the lump is immediately under
the cooking grate. With that level of heat 2 minutes per side, then
maybe another minute per side directly over the coals, then I put it
off to the side for a total of 10-11 minutes, then off and alu foil
wrapped for 5 minutes.

D

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Old 19-04-2007, 05:17 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...

On 19 Apr 2007 02:07:44 GMT, Nick Cramer
wrote:

wrote:
On Wed, 18 Apr 2007 06:47:50 -0400, "43fan"
"Denny Wheeler" wrote in message
On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 13:51:28 -0400, "43fan"

to cook? My thoughts, the grill. Sister in law bought 'em, and
thinking of
frying them!

Well, I gotta say, they turned out pretty durn good. IMO, what she did
was actually "fry" them. *g* Didn't use a cast iron skillet, which I
did suggest, but she elected not to. Little bit of olive oil in the
pan, very hot, not sure how long she cooked on each side, my wife made
me leave the kitchen because she was afraid there'd be a fight!


That's pan-broiling. Now, if the oil had been, say, 1/4" or more
deep....hates the thought of what that'd do to a nice piece of steak
The 'little bit of olive oil' is needed to keep the meat from
sticking. Probably even in nonstick cookware, which I'd not use, cos
I'd want the heat higher than nonstick will tolerate well.


I rub my steaks with EVOO and pat them with salt, fresh ground BP and
garlic powder, then sear them in a very hot, dry, well seasoned CI frying
pan (or grill them over the firebox on my NB).


Works for me.

Harry
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Old 19-04-2007, 03:48 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...


"Denny Wheeler" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 18 Apr 2007 06:47:50 -0400, "43fan"
wrote:


"Denny Wheeler" wrote in message
. ..
On Tue, 17 Apr 2007 13:51:28 -0400, "43fan"
wrote:

to cook? My thoughts, the grill. Sister in law bought 'em, and thinking
of
frying them!

While I pretty much agree with the 'grill' replies, I suspect your
s-i-l was thinking of pan-broiling, which is *not* frying. And one
can produce a very nicely cooked--and seared--thick steak by
pan-broiling. I know this, as my mother used to bring home 2"
porterhouse steaks now and then, and pan-broil 'em. In a
well-seasoned cast iron skillet.
(it kinda was the only available way to cook a steak for us at that
time)

-denny-


Well, I gotta say, they turned out pretty durn good. IMO, what she did
was
actually "fry" them. *g* Didn't use a cast iron skillet, which I did
suggest, but she elected not to. Little bit of olive oil in the pan, very
hot, not sure how long she cooked on each side, my wife made me leave the
kitchen because she was afraid there'd be a fight!


That's pan-broiling. Now, if the oil had been, say, 1/4" or more
deep....hates the thought of what that'd do to a nice piece of steak
The 'little bit of olive oil' is needed to keep the meat from
sticking. Probably even in nonstick cookware, which I'd not use, cos
I'd want the heat higher than nonstick will tolerate well.

Glad they were good!!!


Gotcha on the proper term... And thanks!

LOL Um, I did have to
stop her from putting the things in a 350 deg oven though! Whew....
Took
'em outta the pan, into a baking dish and tented 'em. Then she was gonna
put them in a 350deg oven to "keep 'em warm"... LOL Again, whew... glad
I
yelled... WHOA WHOA WHOAAAAA from the living room on that one and the
wife
stopped her.


D'you have testimony on *why* she was going to put 'em in the oven???
boggle


Nope... I figure she wanted to keep them "warm" is all... of course, not
even thinking how much that would've cooked 'em! *laffin*


-denny-
--

The test of courage comes when we are in the minority.
The test of tolerance comes when we are in the majority.



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Old 19-04-2007, 09:26 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...

"Nick Cramer" wrote

I rub my steaks with EVOO and pat them with salt, fresh ground BP and
garlic powder, then sear them in a very hot, dry, well seasoned CI
frying pan (or grill them over the firebox on my NB).

--
Nick.


Sometimes, I'll omit the EVOO. When using the cast iron, the fat and/or
EVOO helps to keep itseasoned.

BOB


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Old 19-04-2007, 09:58 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...



BOB wrote:
"Nick Cramer" wrote

I rub my steaks with EVOO and pat them with salt, fresh ground BP and
garlic powder, then sear them in a very hot, dry, well seasoned CI
frying pan (or grill them over the firebox on my NB).

--
Nick.


Sometimes, I'll omit the EVOO. When using the cast iron, the fat and/or
EVOO helps to keep itseasoned.

BOB


I can't remember the numbers, but EVOO has a fairly low point at which
the solids begin to burn and smoke. I frequently use it when cooking a
steak on my IR grill, but have wondered if I might improve on the
results a tad by switching to an oil with a higher smoke point, such as
corn oil.

Nonny
--
---Nonnymus---
Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
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Old 19-04-2007, 10:13 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...

"Nonnymus" wrote in message

BOB wrote:
"Nick Cramer" wrote

I rub my steaks with EVOO and pat them with salt, fresh ground BP
and garlic powder, then sear them in a very hot, dry, well
seasoned CI frying pan (or grill them over the firebox on my NB).

--
Nick.


Sometimes, I'll omit the EVOO. When using the cast iron, the fat
and/or EVOO helps to keep itseasoned.

BOB


I can't remember the numbers, but EVOO has a fairly low point at which
the solids begin to burn and smoke. I frequently use it when cooking
a steak on my IR grill, but have wondered if I might improve on the
results a tad by switching to an oil with a higher smoke point, such
as corn oil.


For you, I'd recommend 10-W-50 HD.

For anyone else, I'll stick with the EVOO idea.

BOB




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Old 19-04-2007, 11:28 PM posted to alt.food.barbecue
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...

Nonnymus wrote:
BOB wrote:
"Nick Cramer" wrote

I rub my steaks with EVOO and pat them with salt, fresh ground BP and
garlic powder, then sear them in a very hot, dry, well seasoned CI
frying pan (or grill them over the firebox on my NB).

Sometimes, I'll omit the EVOO. When using the cast iron, the fat
and/or EVOO helps to keep itseasoned.

I can't remember the numbers, but EVOO has a fairly low point at which
the solids begin to burn and smoke. I frequently use it when cooking a
steak on my IR grill, but have wondered if I might improve on the
results a tad by switching to an oil with a higher smoke point, such as
corn oil.


Unrefined olive oil is listed as having a smoke point between 315 and 320
F, although I routinely use EVOO when deep fat frying at 375 to 390 F, with
no smoke. ;-/

For higher temps, the info I have is:

Up to 395F
Refined canola oil (smoke point is below 400 F)
Semirefined walnut oil (smoke point is below 400 F)

Up to 445
Refined corn oil (smoke point is below 450 F)
Refined peanut oil (smoke point is below 450 F)
Refined safflower oil (smoke point is below blow 450 F)
Semirefined sesame oil (smoke point is below 450 F)
Refined soy oil (smoke point is below blow 450 F)
Semirefined sunflower oil (smoke point is below 450 F)
Refined high-oleic sunflower oil (smoke point is below 450 F)

Up to 515F
Refined avocado oil (smoke point is below 520 F)

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their families!

Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !
~Semper Fi~
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Old 20-04-2007, 05:02 AM posted to alt.food.barbecue
wj wj is offline
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Default 1.5" thick T-Bones... best way...

Safflower oil has a smoke point slightly above 500. I use grape seed oil
that has a smoke point of 485.

FWIW I use it all the time to sauté scallops. It's the best way to ensure
that you caramelize them on the outside while leaving the inside still
barely cooked. Two minutes in a really hot pan does the trick.

Here's a website that has all the smoke points of various oils.

http://www.goodeatsfanpage.com/Colle...mokePoints.htm

Good luck.


"Nonnymus" wrote in message
...


BOB wrote:
"Nick Cramer" wrote

I rub my steaks with EVOO and pat them with salt, fresh ground BP and
garlic powder, then sear them in a very hot, dry, well seasoned CI
frying pan (or grill them over the firebox on my NB).

--
Nick.


Sometimes, I'll omit the EVOO. When using the cast iron, the fat and/or
EVOO helps to keep itseasoned.

BOB


I can't remember the numbers, but EVOO has a fairly low point at which the
solids begin to burn and smoke. I frequently use it when cooking a steak
on my IR grill, but have wondered if I might improve on the results a tad
by switching to an oil with a higher smoke point, such as corn oil.

Nonny
--
---Nonnymus---
Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.





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