Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 02:24 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Rowbotth
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oven Temperature Fluctuations

In article ,
Kenneth wrote:

On Wed, 4 Jan 2006 10:29:14 -0700, Eric Jorgensen
wrote:

On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 17:03:52 GMT
"Bob Giel" wrote:

How much can an oven's temperature vary and still give good results?

If set at 350 degrees F., what is the most it should go above or below
the set temperature?
Is there actually a standard or "generally accepted range"?
Is the acceptable range a percentage of the target temperature (e.g. up
or down 5%) or is it an absolute (e.g. up or down 10 degrees F maximum?)



Maverick - people who made the oven thermometer i used until the
thermocouple died - said it's normal for the temperature to fluctuate up to
15% during use, and that their (reasonably good) digital oven thermometer
thus averages the temperature readings it gives you. Which is totally
valid.

Anecdotally - A good friend of mine was working for a semiconductor
company when they developed a laboratory grade electric oven controller
that was far cheaper than any that had come before - back in the early 80's
- so they decided to market it for use in high-end home ovens.

It was capable of regulating the temperature inside the oven to within
+/- 1 degree Celsius, and no oven made with it was ever worth a damn.

Nothing that came out of them was ever cooked properly. Every recipe had
to be adjusted. People hated them. It was a total flop.

The engineers determined that since baking methods have evolved over
time with these temperature fluctuations as a constant, they were actually
required for proper baking without reformulation.


Howdy,

With respect, I don't buy it...

I used (for about 20 years) a Garland commercial gas oven
that fluctuated by about 40F at any setting.

I eventually replaced it with Bongard electric oven that
holds its temperature within a degree or two.

The results from the Bongard are far superior.

I would like to learn more about the ways that the
fluctuations could possibly be of benefit.

All the best,


I think I would agree with Kenneth. When I bought my first house in
'87, I bought a Magic Chef gas range. (Gas was out of vogue at the
time, so I had to go to my gas Utility to find a gas range.)

It used to cook much faster - like a turkey that should take 5 hours to
cook at 325 F would take maybe 3 hours at 325 in that range. Then I
bought a new home in 200, and got a new Sears gas range. This thing has
a much more accurate temperature controller, and actually takes the time
that cook books say it should. I find the meat more moist and tender,
and less dried out.

I was just thinking that the new controller is a recent development.
And I approve. With the anecdote, I'm not certain that I'm buying into
this theory, either.

Oh, well...

H.

  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 02:44 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oven Temperature Fluctuations


"Rowbotth" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Kenneth wrote:

On Wed, 4 Jan 2006 10:29:14 -0700, Eric Jorgensen
wrote:

On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 17:03:52 GMT
"Bob Giel" wrote:

How much can an oven's temperature vary and still give good results?

If set at 350 degrees F., what is the most it should go above or

below
the set temperature?
Is there actually a standard or "generally accepted range"?
Is the acceptable range a percentage of the target temperature (e.g.

up
or down 5%) or is it an absolute (e.g. up or down 10 degrees F

maximum?)


Maverick - people who made the oven thermometer i used until the
thermocouple died - said it's normal for the temperature to fluctuate

up to
15% during use, and that their (reasonably good) digital oven

thermometer
thus averages the temperature readings it gives you. Which is totally
valid.

Anecdotally - A good friend of mine was working for a semiconductor
company when they developed a laboratory grade electric oven controller
that was far cheaper than any that had come before - back in the early

80's
- so they decided to market it for use in high-end home ovens.

It was capable of regulating the temperature inside the oven to

within
+/- 1 degree Celsius, and no oven made with it was ever worth a damn.

Nothing that came out of them was ever cooked properly. Every recipe

had
to be adjusted. People hated them. It was a total flop.

The engineers determined that since baking methods have evolved over
time with these temperature fluctuations as a constant, they were

actually
required for proper baking without reformulation.


Howdy,

With respect, I don't buy it...

I used (for about 20 years) a Garland commercial gas oven
that fluctuated by about 40F at any setting.

I eventually replaced it with Bongard electric oven that
holds its temperature within a degree or two.

The results from the Bongard are far superior.

I would like to learn more about the ways that the
fluctuations could possibly be of benefit.

All the best,


I think I would agree with Kenneth. When I bought my first house in
'87, I bought a Magic Chef gas range. (Gas was out of vogue at the
time, so I had to go to my gas Utility to find a gas range.)

It used to cook much faster - like a turkey that should take 5 hours to
cook at 325 F would take maybe 3 hours at 325 in that range. Then I
bought a new home in 200, and got a new Sears gas range. This thing has
a much more accurate temperature controller, and actually takes the time
that cook books say it should. I find the meat more moist and tender,
and less dried out.

I was just thinking that the new controller is a recent development.
And I approve. With the anecdote, I'm not certain that I'm buying into
this theory, either.

Oh, well...



And I didn't know that Sears has been around since 200!


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 02:50 AM posted to rec.food.baking
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oven Temperature Fluctuations


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"Rowbotth" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Kenneth wrote:

On Wed, 4 Jan 2006 10:29:14 -0700, Eric Jorgensen
wrote:

On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 17:03:52 GMT
"Bob Giel" wrote:

How much can an oven's temperature vary and still give good results?

If set at 350 degrees F., what is the most it should go above or

below
the set temperature?
Is there actually a standard or "generally accepted range"?
Is the acceptable range a percentage of the target temperature (e.g.

up
or down 5%) or is it an absolute (e.g. up or down 10 degrees F

maximum?)


Maverick - people who made the oven thermometer i used until the
thermocouple died - said it's normal for the temperature to fluctuate

up to
15% during use, and that their (reasonably good) digital oven

thermometer
thus averages the temperature readings it gives you. Which is totally
valid.

Anecdotally - A good friend of mine was working for a semiconductor
company when they developed a laboratory grade electric oven
controller
that was far cheaper than any that had come before - back in the early

80's
- so they decided to market it for use in high-end home ovens.

It was capable of regulating the temperature inside the oven to

within
+/- 1 degree Celsius, and no oven made with it was ever worth a damn.

Nothing that came out of them was ever cooked properly. Every
recipe

had
to be adjusted. People hated them. It was a total flop.

The engineers determined that since baking methods have evolved
over
time with these temperature fluctuations as a constant, they were

actually
required for proper baking without reformulation.

Howdy,

With respect, I don't buy it...

I used (for about 20 years) a Garland commercial gas oven
that fluctuated by about 40F at any setting.

I eventually replaced it with Bongard electric oven that
holds its temperature within a degree or two.

The results from the Bongard are far superior.

I would like to learn more about the ways that the
fluctuations could possibly be of benefit.

All the best,


I think I would agree with Kenneth. When I bought my first house in
'87, I bought a Magic Chef gas range. (Gas was out of vogue at the
time, so I had to go to my gas Utility to find a gas range.)

It used to cook much faster - like a turkey that should take 5 hours to
cook at 325 F would take maybe 3 hours at 325 in that range. Then I
bought a new home in 200, and got a new Sears gas range. This thing has
a much more accurate temperature controller, and actually takes the time
that cook books say it should. I find the meat more moist and tender,
and less dried out.

I was just thinking that the new controller is a recent development.
And I approve. With the anecdote, I'm not certain that I'm buying into
this theory, either.

Oh, well...



And I didn't know that Sears has been around since 200!

Have you seen some of the "fashion" they sell? :-)
Graham


  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 02:58 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oven Temperature Fluctuations


"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]


And I didn't know that Sears has been around since 200!

Have you seen some of the "fashion" they sell? :-)
Graham


This is a really awful story, but I will tell it anyway. I worked at an
office that leased space inside a Sear store. We had an employee in our
central office with some sort of deformity that made him limp rather
noticeable. One day he was in our office, and upon seeing him make his way
toward the door to leave, someone said, "See, that's what happens when you
buy your shoes at Sears."


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 03:02 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Boron Elgar
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oven Temperature Fluctuations

On Thu, 05 Jan 2006 01:44:47 GMT, "Vox Humana"
wrote:


"Rowbotth" wrote in message
Then I
bought a new home in 200, and got a new Sears gas range. This thing has
a much more accurate temperature controller, and actually takes the time
that cook books say it should. I find the meat more moist and tender,
and less dried out.

I was just thinking that the new controller is a recent development.
And I approve. With the anecdote, I'm not certain that I'm buying into
this theory, either.

Oh, well...



And I didn't know that Sears has been around since 200!


All the Barbarians got their stuff there.

Boron




  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 05-01-2006, 03:51 AM posted to rec.food.baking
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oven Temperature Fluctuations


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
...

"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]


And I didn't know that Sears has been around since 200!

Have you seen some of the "fashion" they sell? :-)
Graham


This is a really awful story, but I will tell it anyway. I worked at an
office that leased space inside a Sear store. We had an employee in our
central office with some sort of deformity that made him limp rather
noticeable. One day he was in our office, and upon seeing him make his
way
toward the door to leave, someone said, "See, that's what happens when you
buy your shoes at Sears."

LOL!


  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 06-01-2006, 03:15 AM posted to rec.food.baking
Rowbotth
 
Posts: n/a
Default Oven Temperature Fluctuations

In article ,
"Vox Humana" wrote:

"Rowbotth" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Kenneth wrote:

On Wed, 4 Jan 2006 10:29:14 -0700, Eric Jorgensen
wrote:

On Sun, 01 Jan 2006 17:03:52 GMT
"Bob Giel" wrote:

How much can an oven's temperature vary and still give good results?

If set at 350 degrees F., what is the most it should go above or

below
the set temperature?
Is there actually a standard or "generally accepted range"?
Is the acceptable range a percentage of the target temperature (e.g.

up
or down 5%) or is it an absolute (e.g. up or down 10 degrees F

maximum?)


Maverick - people who made the oven thermometer i used until the
thermocouple died - said it's normal for the temperature to fluctuate

up to
15% during use, and that their (reasonably good) digital oven

thermometer
thus averages the temperature readings it gives you. Which is totally
valid.

Anecdotally - A good friend of mine was working for a semiconductor
company when they developed a laboratory grade electric oven controller
that was far cheaper than any that had come before - back in the early

80's
- so they decided to market it for use in high-end home ovens.

It was capable of regulating the temperature inside the oven to

within
+/- 1 degree Celsius, and no oven made with it was ever worth a damn.

Nothing that came out of them was ever cooked properly. Every recipe

had
to be adjusted. People hated them. It was a total flop.

The engineers determined that since baking methods have evolved over
time with these temperature fluctuations as a constant, they were

actually
required for proper baking without reformulation.

Howdy,

With respect, I don't buy it...

I used (for about 20 years) a Garland commercial gas oven
that fluctuated by about 40F at any setting.

I eventually replaced it with Bongard electric oven that
holds its temperature within a degree or two.

The results from the Bongard are far superior.

I would like to learn more about the ways that the
fluctuations could possibly be of benefit.

All the best,


I think I would agree with Kenneth. When I bought my first house in
'87, I bought a Magic Chef gas range. (Gas was out of vogue at the
time, so I had to go to my gas Utility to find a gas range.)

It used to cook much faster - like a turkey that should take 5 hours to
cook at 325 F would take maybe 3 hours at 325 in that range. Then I
bought a new home in 200, and got a new Sears gas range. This thing has
a much more accurate temperature controller, and actually takes the time
that cook books say it should. I find the meat more moist and tender,
and less dried out.

I was just thinking that the new controller is a recent development.
And I approve. With the anecdote, I'm not certain that I'm buying into
this theory, either.

Oh, well...



And I didn't know that Sears has been around since 200!


OOPS! (Dog years???)

H.


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