Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 30-12-2005, 03:48 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What mixer would be the minimum you would recommend for cookiedough?

On Thu, 29 Dec 2005, Reg wrote:

. wrote:

On Wed, 28 Dec 2005, wrote:

what about a food processor?


For cookie dough? I grew up in a house with a stand mixer and no food
processor. Not really sure what you can do with a food processor. I
thought they were good for slicing, mincing or blending things. Can you
use they like a mixer?


FP's do come with a dough attachment, so they can be used
to make cookie and bread doughs. I don't. I prefer the mixer
for these, especially for bread.


I'll probably stick to my stand mixer as well. I guess if all you have is
a food processor it might be worth trying.

FP's are great for pie doughs however, using the regular
chopping blade. They do a fine job of cutting in the
butter/shortening for flaky doughs.


Hmm, maybe I'll give this a try. My wife just got a food processor for
Christmas. Used it to puree raspberries. Worked fairly well; normally I'd
make a compote on the stove. This time I tried making a puree then
straining it to get the seeds out. A lot easier and quicker than making a
compote.

For cutting in butter I like to freeze the butter then use a grater. I
take the little pellets and mix them in the flour until coated then finish
up with a whisk. Works fairly well.

Thanks for the information,
Darrell

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca


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Old 30-12-2005, 03:55 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What mixer would be the minimum you would recommend for cookiedough?

On Thu, 29 Dec 2005, Vox Humana wrote:

""."" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 28 Dec 2005, wrote:

what about a food processor?


For cookie dough? I grew up in a house with a stand mixer and no food
processor. Not really sure what you can do with a food processor. I
thought they were good for slicing, mincing or blending things. Can you
use they like a mixer?


Yes and no. Food processors can be used to make bread dough and cookie
dough. It is my preferred way of making bread and pie pastry. Rose
Beranabum's Christmas Cookie book has directions for using the FP for all
her cookie recipes. The area where the FP doesn't do well compared to a
mixer is for products where you don't want to develop much gluten - like
cakes. I use mine for some cakes and for quick breads. You just have to be
careful not to over mix. The other issue with the FP is capacity. Most FPs
don't come close to the capacity of a stand mixer. I have both, but I use
my FP much more than the stand mixer.


I was going to ask Reg if he had a reference to the technique of using a
food processor for dough. Thanks for providing one. I'll see if our local
bookstore has a copy.

Hadn't thought about capacity. My wife's FP is only 3 quarts. My stand
mixer is 6 quarts. I'll probably stick to using what I know during my peak
baking seasons, i.e. my stand mixer. I usually have time in the summer to
play and experiment.

Thanks again for the reference to Rose Beranabum's book,
Darrell

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca

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Old 30-12-2005, 05:35 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What mixer would be the minimum you would recommend for cookie dough?

so conceivably you could grate the frozen butter in the fp like you do
cheese?

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Old 30-12-2005, 08:57 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Vox Humana
 
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Default What mixer would be the minimum you would recommend for cookie dough?


wrote in message
oups.com...
so conceivably you could grate the frozen butter in the fp like you do
cheese?


You could. I haven't seen anyone do it that way but I don't see why it
couldn't work. My only concern would be that after the butter was grated,
you would have to be very careful about not processing too much more. The
size of the butter particles after grating would be about the final size you
would want. If you added liquid and then processed much more, I suspect
that the particles would be too small or would melt from the friction of the
blade. It is intriguing though and I will give it a try.




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Old 30-12-2005, 10:11 PM posted to rec.food.baking
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Default What mixer would be the minimum you would recommend for cookie dough?

I'm with you. I don't know how much the Kitchenaid phone rep knows but
she agreed with me today that the 770 and the 760 ($70 price
difference) differ in that the base is metal in the 770 and therefore 5
pounds heavier. So I am definitely getting a black 760 when I really
really want a red one (an IMPERIAL CHINESE red one bwahaha). The 750
comes in colors but it doesn't have the big chute.

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Old 31-12-2005, 09:02 AM posted to rec.food.baking
-L.
 
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Default What mixer would be the minimum you would recommend for cookie dough?


Craig Busch wrote:
The thought of not using a mixer is a possibility. I guess I would have
thought that it might be easier to have an even mixture.
Thank you


Actually I prefer to mix cookies by hand - they come out so much
better.
-L.



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