Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 17-11-2005, 07:00 PM posted to rec.food.baking
Hilbert
 
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Default Baking books

Hello,

I love baking, do a lot of it, mostly mostly from epicurious.com.
I baked our wedding cake recently, which came out awesome- a lemon
respberry pound cake.

I never had baking education, and now would like to learn a bit more
about techniques, combining tastes etc.. For example why do I need to
freeze the flower when preparing a pie crust? Why does chocolate and
wasabi taste good together?

Could youplease suggest some in-depth baking/cooking books?

Thanks,
Hilbert


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Old 17-11-2005, 08:18 PM posted to rec.food.baking
 
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Default Baking books

I would suggest the book "How Baking Works: Exploring the Fundamentals
of Baking Science" by Paula Figoni.
DESCRIPTION :
Accessible coverage of the science of baking
Underlying the artistic considerations involved in baking is science,
and no other text offers as in-depth coverage of the "whys" of baking
as "How Baking Works. By helping bakers and pastry chefs better
understand the major ingredient groups and reactions ingredients
undergo during basic baking techniques, this insightful book is an
essential key to mastering skills, effectively adapting to todays
quickly evolving trends, and understanding a wide array of ingredients
from different cultures.

In a clear, easy-to-understand format, "How Baking Works explains how
sweeteners, fats, leavening agents, and other ingredients work, as well
as how to apply scientific knowledge to answer such questions as: By
doubling the sugar in a pound cake, how does that affect the
appearance, flavor, and texture of the end product? Each chapter
concludes with helpful review exercises and lab experiments, making
this book an engaging learning tool.

Complete with dozens of informative illustrations, "How Baking Works is
a versatile instructional book for students in culinary and baking
programs and professional bakers and pastry chefs.

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Old 19-11-2005, 01:40 AM posted to rec.food.baking
 
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Default Baking books

A baking book that I purchased recently is "The King Arthur Flour
Baker's Companion" I like this book a lot. Bobbi Jo

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Old 21-11-2005, 10:22 PM posted to rec.food.baking
.
 
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Default Baking books

On Thu, 17 Nov 2005, Hilbert wrote:

Hello,

I love baking, do a lot of it, mostly mostly from epicurious.com.
I baked our wedding cake recently, which came out awesome- a lemon
respberry pound cake.

I never had baking education, and now would like to learn a bit more
about techniques, combining tastes etc.. For example why do I need to
freeze the flower when preparing a pie crust? Why does chocolate and
wasabi taste good together?

Could youplease suggest some in-depth baking/cooking books?


Do you have any cooking schools near you? I live in a large city with many
culinary institutes. I go to them and see what textbooks they require and
recommend for classes. These tend to be good because they don't teach you
how to make X, they teach why a recipe is successful in making X and how
you can alter the recipe. It sounds like you are looking for WHY things
are the way they are rather than just the HOW do bake things.

If you are looking for specific answers, go to www.google.ca and search
the them.

--
Send e-mail to: darrell dot grainger at utoronto dot ca

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Old 29-11-2005, 10:22 PM posted to rec.food.baking
betsy
 
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Default Baking books


Hilbert wrote:
Hello,

I love baking, do a lot of it, mostly mostly from epicurious.com.
I baked our wedding cake recently, which came out awesome- a lemon
respberry pound cake.

I never had baking education, and now would like to learn a bit more
about techniques, combining tastes etc.. For example why do I need to
freeze the flower when preparing a pie crust? Why does chocolate and
wasabi taste good together?

Could youplease suggest some in-depth baking/cooking books?

Thanks,
Hilbert


I suggest a book by Shirley Corriher, though I forget the exact title
at the moment. Very good, scientific but not gobbledy-gook, and has
sample recipes to illustrate principles discussed. And of course,
don't forget Harold McGee, the bible of them all.
betsy



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