Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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Old 04-10-2005, 07:47 PM
Guy Smith
 
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Default Granary Bread not rising

I have invested in a Morph Richard automatic bread making machine. Whilst
the white bread works fine my preferred bread, granary will not rise
properly. I have done everything in their trouble-shooter including:
increasing the yeast a little and a lot, increasing the and heating the
water, checked the sell by date on the flour, increasing the sugar and salt.
Has anyone any suggestions please?
I am assuming that the large loaf is supposed to fill the tin after baking?



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Old 05-10-2005, 01:51 AM
 
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For whole grains bread, my machine has a 30 minute soak period before
it starts the mixing. Also, on of my books recommends soaking whole
wheat flour in some of the water before starting to mix whole wheat
bread.

Also, the bread rises more quickly with the addition of a small amount
of acid. I add a scant 1/4 tsp. of powdered lemon (unsweetened
Kool-Aid) to a 1 pound loaf.

Also, I add a tablespoon of vital gluten for each pound of bread that
is half whole wheat.

Just a few of ideas. But, I'm afraid bread with whole grains do not
rise a much as a high protein white flour, regardless of what is done.

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Old 06-10-2005, 08:04 PM
Guy Smith
 
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Thank you for the answers I will source the ingredients and give it a go.

I assume you are from North America, as is the bread maker and its measuring
equipment. Can you tell me why the butter is measured in 'tablespoons'? Is a
very awkward way of measuring butter? In the UK we always do it in grams or
ounces. What is a tablespoon of butter in weight do you think?


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Old 06-10-2005, 08:15 PM
Boron Elgar
 
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On Thu, 6 Oct 2005 20:04:49 +0100, "Guy Smith"
wrote:

Thank you for the answers I will source the ingredients and give it a go.

I assume you are from North America, as is the bread maker and its measuring
equipment. Can you tell me why the butter is measured in 'tablespoons'? Is a
very awkward way of measuring butter? In the UK we always do it in grams or
ounces. What is a tablespoon of butter in weight do you think?


8 tablespoons is 4 ounces.

Our butter is packed in "sticks," each of which is 4 ounces. The
sticks have the tablespoons marked in lines on the individual
wrappers.

http://www.ochef.com/837.htm

Boron
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Old 06-10-2005, 08:28 PM
Guy Smith
 
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Cunning, definatly a lot easyer than scooping soft butter in and out of a
measuering spoon - Thanks.




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Old 07-10-2005, 03:47 AM
Dave Bell
 
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Guy Smith wrote:
Cunning, definatly a lot easyer than scooping soft butter in and out of a
measuering spoon - Thanks.


Of course, the paper wrapper is rarely aligned exactly with the stick,
so you kinda have to guesstimate the fractional tablespoon it's off.

Dave
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Old 07-10-2005, 12:56 PM
Boron Elgar
 
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On Fri, 07 Oct 2005 02:47:59 GMT, Dave Bell
wrote:

Guy Smith wrote:
Cunning, definatly a lot easyer than scooping soft butter in and out of a
measuering spoon - Thanks.


Of course, the paper wrapper is rarely aligned exactly with the stick,
so you kinda have to guesstimate the fractional tablespoon it's off.

Dave



They do not want to take all the fun out of it.

Boron


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