Baking (rec.food.baking) For bakers, would-be bakers, and fans and consumers of breads, pastries, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, bagels, and other items commonly found in a bakery. Includes all methods of preparation, both conventional and not.

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  #16 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 02:33 AM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
.. .

"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in

,
(Dee Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls that
turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? That looks close

to
the type of cinnamon roll *I'd* like to be able to make. It appears to

be
one of the yeast-raised type, but all the recipes I've tried to date

fall
into one of 2 categories, either the too-dry, not-very-yeasty, fluffy
"supermarket" cinnamon roll (usually looking a bit like ICR01A, perhaps
slightly flatter), or the absurdly sweet, greasy, heavy, WAAY-way
overloaded "Cinnabon"-style roll (usually looking a bit like roll.jpg).
At
least from its appearance, the one I've singled out looks like it'd be

what
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp
crust,
pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most importantly,

not
tooth-aching sweetness.


The sweetness and the intensity of the cinnamon are nearly entirely
attributable to the filling and topping. There is a limit to the amount
of
sugar you can add to yeast dough before it fails to perform, so it is
unlikely that the dough is the sauce of too much sweetness unless your
threshold for sweetness is very low.

I use the recipe for sweet dough that is in the Kitchen Aid stand mixer
cookbook. I roll that out, slather it with butter, sprinkle with brown
sugar and then with cinnamon. I don't measure the ingredients for the
filling. You can control the texture of the crust by the length of
baking,
the sweetness by moderating the sugar in the filling, the intensity of

the
cinnamon by using it sparingly. I think much of the cloying sweetness

of
the Cinnamon product is from the mountain of frosting they slather on

it.
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter
2 pkgs. yeast
1/3 cup of warm water ( 105-115F)
3 eggs
5/12 to 6 1/2 cups AP flour


Prepare dough as you would any other bread (I will list the instructions
if
you want, but I assume that you know how to make yeasted dough) and let
rise
until double.

Deflate dough, roll out into rectangle approx. 14 x 20. Spread or

brush
on
a thin coating of soft butter. Sprinkle with sugar or brown sugar and
then
with cinnamon. Roll, starting at long end. Cut into slices approx. 1 -
1.25
inches thick. Place on parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise until
nearly
double. Bake in preheated, 350F oven for 25-30 minutes. Let cool.
Drizzle
with glaze or frost as desired.

I think this tends to fulfill your requirement of being yeasty,
bread-like,
and moist. The sweetness and spiciness is up to you.



Many thanks for this recipe!!! I detest cinnamon buns due to the awful,
cloying smells in just about every shopping mall!
Therefore, I have just adapted your recipe and made maple-walnut buns
instead. I've posted the results to yahoo

http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group...ase.yahoo.com/

I reduced the sugar by 40g and substituted 40g of maple syrup instead.
After rolling out and brushing with butter, I sprinkled 115g of coarse

maple
sugar and 100g chopped walnuts over the dough and rolled as instructed.
After baking I brushed the tops with maple syrup.
Next time, I'll replace all the sugar in the dough with maple syrup and
adjust the flour accordingly. This is the first time I've ever made this
type of roll/bun and I know now that it won't be the last!
Again, thanks for the recipe.
Graham


You might consider using some maple flavoring in the dough. Unless you are
using genuine maple syrup, you are using maple flavoring anyway. The
flavoring would allow you to greatly increase the maple flavor, even beyond
what using maple or maple flavored syrup would permit. I wonder how the
gluten and browning characteristics would be effected using all maple syrup
instead of sugar. I'm sure Roy would know. Again, adding the maple flavor
to a glaze applied to the warm rolls would be another way to increase the
flavor.



  #17 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 03:05 AM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]


I've eaten 3 so far and the taste of maple isn't quite strong enough so

next
time, I'll definitely use syrup in the dough.
Tomorrow I will prepare the same type of dough but sans sugar and make a
cheese version - my grand-daughter loves cheese buns:-) and it's her 3rd
birthday on Tuesday.
Graham


I make cheese filled rolls using that dough, but I like the one listed below
a bit better. It is a little more delicate. When I say cheese, I mean
cream cheese or the semi-soft farmer's cheese. I will take 8 oz of cream
cheese, an egg yolk, a tablespoon of flour, a little sugar to taste - maybe
a tablespoon, a splash of vanilla, and a couple teaspoons of lemon zest and
mix well.

I make the dough and either form into small golf-ball sized spheres, put an
indentation with my thumb, put a teaspoon of the filling in the indentation,
let rise, and bake for about 20 minutes at 350F.

The alternative is to make a false plat. I roll out the dough into a
rectangle about 8 x 12 inches and spread the filling in the center, leaving
a good 1 1/2 inches exposed all around. Then I use a very sharp knife or a
pizza cutter to put parallel cuts at a 45 degree angle about one inch wide
all around. Starting at one end, I fold the strips into the center,
overlapping them until they are all folded. This produces the impression of
a braid. I usually brush the top with an egg wash and sprinkle with coarse
sugar, let rise, and bake at 350F for about 20-25 minutes. It looks like
you spent hours on it, but it is really simple. Sometimes I will streak a
little raspberry preserves or apricot or prune lekvar on the cheese before
platting. The following recipe makes two coffeecakes or about two dozen
large rolls.

I also use this dough for poppy seed roll. I roll out as for cinnamon rolls
and then spread one can of Solo brand poppy seed filling over the surface.
You can also sprinkle with softened raisins if you wish. The dough is
rolled and baked on a sheet (it isn't cut into individual rolls before
baking.) This is a traditional Czech holiday food. When my mother made
poppy seed and nut rolls, you knew it was Christmas! An alternative would
be to use Solo brand nut filling. I generally don't like packaged foods,
but in the case of the poppy seed filling, you have to have a special
grinder for the poppy seeds and most people don't want to invest in a
hard-to-find, specialty item. The canned is almost as good as homemade, but
it is a little stiff. You can warm it in the microwave and thin with a few
drops of milk if you find it hard to spread without tearing the dough.

If your store doesn't carry Solo brand products, you can order them from
their website at
http://www.solofoods.com/oven.html

Check out the recipes there also. There are some good traditional Czech and
Polish recipes for baked goods.

------------
4 cup warm water
1 tablespoon (1 pkg. yeast)
1/3 cup sugar
5 3/4 to 6 3/4 cups unbleached AP flour
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup warm milk
1 cup sour cream (room temperature)
3 large eggs (room temperature)
finely grated zest of 1 lemon
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
cut into small pieces

Proof the yeast with the water and a pinch of the sugar. Combine 1 1/2 cups
of flour, sugar and salt in a bowl. Make a well in the center and add the
sour cream, eggs, and zest. Beat until smooth. Add yeast and beat about
one minute. Add another cup of flour and beat for a minute. Add the butter
and beat until incorporated. Start adding the flour 1/2 cup at a time until
a very soft and somewhat shaggy dough is formed. This dough is very soft -
don't add too much flour. Knead for about 4 minutes using a bench scraper
if necessary - avoid adding too much additional flour. (I make this in the
KA mixer with the dough hook and knead on medium for 4 minutes) Let rise
until double (2 - 3 hours) Do not let the dough over rise or it will have a
poor texture. You can refrigerate at this point for up to 24 hours but
don't deflate the dough.

*this can be reduced by half and made in the food processor. I put all the
dry ingredients, including instant dry yeast in the bowl and pulse a few
time. Then I add the rest of the ingredients, minus the milk and pulse
until well combined. With the machine running, I add enough milk to make a
sticky dough. If the dough is too sticky, add a few tablespoons of flour
until it is the right consistency.


  #18 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 03:19 AM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
------------
4 cup warm water
1 tablespoon (1 pkg. yeast)
1/3 cup sugar
5 3/4 to 6 3/4 cups unbleached AP flour
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup warm milk
1 cup sour cream (room temperature)
3 large eggs (room temperature)
finely grated zest of 1 lemon
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
cut into small pieces


I made an error in the recipe above. It should read 1/4 cup warm water, NOT
4 cup(s) The correct version is below:

1/4 cup warm water
1 tablespoon (1 pkg. yeast)
1/3 cup sugar
5 3/4 to 6 3/4 cups unbleached AP flour
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup warm milk
1 cup sour cream (room temperature)
3 large eggs (room temperature)
finely grated zest of 1 lemon
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
cut into small pieces




  #19 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 04:11 AM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
.. .

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
.. .

"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in

,
(Dee Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls
that
turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? That looks close

to
the type of cinnamon roll *I'd* like to be able to make. It appears to

be
one of the yeast-raised type, but all the recipes I've tried to date

fall
into one of 2 categories, either the too-dry, not-very-yeasty, fluffy
"supermarket" cinnamon roll (usually looking a bit like ICR01A,
perhaps
slightly flatter), or the absurdly sweet, greasy, heavy, WAAY-way
overloaded "Cinnabon"-style roll (usually looking a bit like
roll.jpg).
At
least from its appearance, the one I've singled out looks like it'd be
what
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp
crust,
pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most importantly,

not
tooth-aching sweetness.

The sweetness and the intensity of the cinnamon are nearly entirely
attributable to the filling and topping. There is a limit to the
amount
of
sugar you can add to yeast dough before it fails to perform, so it is
unlikely that the dough is the sauce of too much sweetness unless your
threshold for sweetness is very low.

I use the recipe for sweet dough that is in the Kitchen Aid stand mixer
cookbook. I roll that out, slather it with butter, sprinkle with brown
sugar and then with cinnamon. I don't measure the ingredients for the
filling. You can control the texture of the crust by the length of
baking,
the sweetness by moderating the sugar in the filling, the intensity of

the
cinnamon by using it sparingly. I think much of the cloying sweetness

of
the Cinnamon product is from the mountain of frosting they slather on

it.
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter
2 pkgs. yeast
1/3 cup of warm water ( 105-115F)
3 eggs
5/12 to 6 1/2 cups AP flour


Prepare dough as you would any other bread (I will list the
instructions
if
you want, but I assume that you know how to make yeasted dough) and let
rise
until double.

Deflate dough, roll out into rectangle approx. 14 x 20. Spread or

brush
on
a thin coating of soft butter. Sprinkle with sugar or brown sugar and
then
with cinnamon. Roll, starting at long end. Cut into slices approx. 1 -
1.25
inches thick. Place on parchment lined baking sheet. Let rise until
nearly
double. Bake in preheated, 350F oven for 25-30 minutes. Let cool.
Drizzle
with glaze or frost as desired.

I think this tends to fulfill your requirement of being yeasty,
bread-like,
and moist. The sweetness and spiciness is up to you.

Dear Vox,
I am preparing my dough. Since it is such a big amount of dough, I'm
wondering if you've frozen half your dough at any time. If you have, at
what point have you frozen it.
Here are the instructions from the sweet dough recipe - paraphrasing:
"Place in a bowl and let rise about an hour."
At this point after you take it out of the bowl, I guess is the point I
could freeze the half batch of dough?
Thanks so much.
Dee


I think you could freeze it either went it is just mixed (before the 1st
rise) or after. With all the sugar and fat in the dough, I find it takes
a
good amount of time to rise, so I don't know how it would be out of the
freezer. You would probably have to let it defrost in the refrigerator
over
night.

If you don't want that much dough, half the recipe. I do this regularly
and
make it in the food processor. I put all the dry ingredients, including
the
instant yeast in the bowl and pulse it a few times. Then I add the eggs,
water, and butter. While it is running , I add enough warm milk to make a
proper dough. It is so quick that it is probably less fuss to make it
fresh
than to freeze. However, if I were to freeze the dough, I would just make
up the rolls and freeze them. I would then take them out of the freezer
and
let them rise and then bake. That way, I would be able to make one or two
at a time. This would be especially handy for weekend breakfasts/brunch.
The night before I would put a couple rolls in the refrigerator and then
remove them in the morning to finish rising. I have been known to put
cold
dough in the microwave at 30% power for a minute or so to quickly bring it
to room temperature. You would have to experiment with you oven doing it
in
30 second bursts until you get a feel for the amount of time required.

I have a Seal-A-Meal which allows you to stop the vacuum and seal as
needed.
For delicate items I often abort the cycle before things are crushed. If
I
were freezing baked goods, I would put them on a tray, cover with film,
and
freeze solid for a few hours. Then, I would put the individually frozen
items in the Foodsaver bags and vacuum pack them. I do this with raw
cookie
dough. I scoop out the dough, freeze solid, and then packages the
portioned
raw dough. Then I just remove as much dough as I want and bake as usual
adding about 5 minutes to the baking time. That way I can mix a double or
triple batch of dough and we can have fresh cookies at a moment's notice.
Pre-freezing and then packaging is often the best solution for delicate
items.


Thanks a LOT for all these options. I hardly bake (except for bread) and
this recipe has got me started. The last week I've made a couple of loaves
of bread in the food processor. You've been a source of encouragement
regarding using the fp for doughs. So I appreciate from you your
information about how to get this cinnamon roll recipe halved and adapted to
the fp.
Your information filed under: "Cinnamon rolls."
Dee


  #20 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 04:58 AM
Dave Bell
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Dee Randall wrote:

It's getting a little late here, so I think they'll be ready by 10 pm. Too
late to put the coffee-pot on. I hope they will not stale-up before
breakfast.


And this is a good reason to have some good quality, French Roast, decaf
beans in the freezer!

Dave


  #21 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 03:45 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

Thanks a LOT for all these options. I hardly bake (except for bread) and
this recipe has got me started. The last week I've made a couple of

loaves
of bread in the food processor. You've been a source of encouragement
regarding using the fp for doughs. So I appreciate from you your
information about how to get this cinnamon roll recipe halved and adapted

to
the fp.
Your information filed under: "Cinnamon rolls."
Dee


I like to bake but I detest cleaning up. My kitchen is small an it doesn't
take much to turn it into a disaster zone. Since I have an open floor plan,
it is like cooking in the living room, so I just can't close the door and
hide a big mess. I find the food processor is a great help in preventing a
mess when baking. When I use the stand mixer I inevitably send a cloud of
flour across the kitchen. The FP contains he mess and makes quick work of
producing bread dough and pie pastry. I have learned to use it for cookie
dough and quick-bread batter.


  #22 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 04:19 PM
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]


I've eaten 3 so far and the taste of maple isn't quite strong enough so

next
time, I'll definitely use syrup in the dough.
Tomorrow I will prepare the same type of dough but sans sugar and make a
cheese version - my grand-daughter loves cheese buns:-) and it's her 3rd
birthday on Tuesday.
Graham


I make cheese filled rolls using that dough, but I like the one listed
below
a bit better. It is a little more delicate. When I say cheese, I mean
cream cheese or the semi-soft farmer's cheese. I will take 8 oz of cream
cheese, an egg yolk, a tablespoon of flour, a little sugar to taste -
maybe
a tablespoon, a splash of vanilla, and a couple teaspoons of lemon zest
and
mix well.

I make the dough and either form into small golf-ball sized spheres, put
an
indentation with my thumb, put a teaspoon of the filling in the
indentation,
let rise, and bake for about 20 minutes at 350F.

The alternative is to make a false plat. I roll out the dough into a
rectangle about 8 x 12 inches and spread the filling in the center,
leaving
a good 1 1/2 inches exposed all around. Then I use a very sharp knife or
a
pizza cutter to put parallel cuts at a 45 degree angle about one inch wide
all around. Starting at one end, I fold the strips into the center,
overlapping them until they are all folded. This produces the impression
of
a braid. I usually brush the top with an egg wash and sprinkle with
coarse
sugar, let rise, and bake at 350F for about 20-25 minutes. It looks like
you spent hours on it, but it is really simple. Sometimes I will streak a
little raspberry preserves or apricot or prune lekvar on the cheese before
platting. The following recipe makes two coffeecakes or about two dozen
large rolls.

I also use this dough for poppy seed roll. I roll out as for cinnamon
rolls
and then spread one can of Solo brand poppy seed filling over the surface.
You can also sprinkle with softened raisins if you wish. The dough is
rolled and baked on a sheet (it isn't cut into individual rolls before
baking.) This is a traditional Czech holiday food. When my mother made
poppy seed and nut rolls, you knew it was Christmas! An alternative would
be to use Solo brand nut filling. I generally don't like packaged foods,
but in the case of the poppy seed filling, you have to have a special
grinder for the poppy seeds and most people don't want to invest in a
hard-to-find, specialty item. The canned is almost as good as homemade,
but
it is a little stiff. You can warm it in the microwave and thin with a
few
drops of milk if you find it hard to spread without tearing the dough.

If your store doesn't carry Solo brand products, you can order them from
their website at
http://www.solofoods.com/oven.html

Check out the recipes there also. There are some good traditional Czech
and
Polish recipes for baked goods.

------------
4 cup warm water
1 tablespoon (1 pkg. yeast)
1/3 cup sugar
5 3/4 to 6 3/4 cups unbleached AP flour
1 1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup warm milk
1 cup sour cream (room temperature)
3 large eggs (room temperature)
finely grated zest of 1 lemon
8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
cut into small pieces

Proof the yeast with the water and a pinch of the sugar. Combine 1 1/2
cups
of flour, sugar and salt in a bowl. Make a well in the center and add the
sour cream, eggs, and zest. Beat until smooth. Add yeast and beat about
one minute. Add another cup of flour and beat for a minute. Add the butter
and beat until incorporated. Start adding the flour 1/2 cup at a time
until
a very soft and somewhat shaggy dough is formed. This dough is very soft -
don't add too much flour. Knead for about 4 minutes using a bench scraper
if necessary - avoid adding too much additional flour. (I make this in the
KA mixer with the dough hook and knead on medium for 4 minutes) Let rise
until double (2 - 3 hours) Do not let the dough over rise or it will have
a
poor texture. You can refrigerate at this point for up to 24 hours but
don't deflate the dough.

*this can be reduced by half and made in the food processor. I put all
the
dry ingredients, including instant dry yeast in the bowl and pulse a few
time. Then I add the rest of the ingredients, minus the milk and pulse
until well combined. With the machine running, I add enough milk to make
a
sticky dough. If the dough is too sticky, add a few tablespoons of flour
until it is the right consistency.

This one looks good! I think I'll save it for xmas as I'm trying to control
the calories (yeah, right). Correction noted.
The plain dough is on its first rise at the moment for the cheese buns.
Many thanks
Graham


  #23 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 04:29 PM
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
news

"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
Many thanks for this recipe!!! I detest cinnamon buns due to the
awful,

cloying smells in just about every shopping mall!
Therefore, I have just adapted your recipe and made maple-walnut buns
instead. I've posted the results to yahoo

http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group...ase.yahoo.com/

I reduced the sugar by 40g and substituted 40g of maple syrup instead.
After rolling out and brushing with butter, I sprinkled 115g of coarse

maple
sugar and 100g chopped walnuts over the dough and rolled as instructed.
After baking I brushed the tops with maple syrup.
Next time, I'll replace all the sugar in the dough with maple syrup and
adjust the flour accordingly. This is the first time I've ever made this
type of roll/bun and I know now that it won't be the last!
Again, thanks for the recipe.
Graham


You might consider using some maple flavoring in the dough. Unless you
are
using genuine maple syrup, you are using maple flavoring anyway. The
flavoring would allow you to greatly increase the maple flavor, even
beyond
what using maple or maple flavored syrup would permit. I wonder how the
gluten and browning characteristics would be effected using all maple
syrup
instead of sugar. I'm sure Roy would know. Again, adding the maple flavor
to a glaze applied to the warm rolls would be another way to increase the
flavor.

I was using #1 grade Canadian maple syrup. I'm not keen on using any
artificial flavours but the total replacement of the sugar with syrup may be
sufficient, along with the maple syrup painted on the rolls when they come
out of the oven. Sometimes a nice, subtle flavour is better than the
"hit-you-in-the-face" sensation one gets from supermarket and shopping mall
concession cinnamon rolls.
I really like your dough recipe! I'm using eggs from an organic farm and
the yolks are deep yellow so the dough has a really pleasing color.
Graham


  #24 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 04:35 PM
graham
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

Thanks a LOT for all these options. I hardly bake (except for bread) and
this recipe has got me started. The last week I've made a couple of

loaves
of bread in the food processor. You've been a source of encouragement
regarding using the fp for doughs. So I appreciate from you your
information about how to get this cinnamon roll recipe halved and adapted

to
the fp.
Your information filed under: "Cinnamon rolls."
Dee


I like to bake but I detest cleaning up. My kitchen is small an it
doesn't
take much to turn it into a disaster zone. Since I have an open floor
plan,
it is like cooking in the living room, so I just can't close the door and
hide a big mess. I find the food processor is a great help in preventing
a
mess when baking. When I use the stand mixer I inevitably send a cloud of
flour across the kitchen. The FP contains he mess and makes quick work of
producing bread dough and pie pastry. I have learned to use it for cookie
dough and quick-bread batter.

I used my Cuisinart for many years to make bread dough until I bought the
Bosch to make large quantities of pain-au-levain. Starting at 6pm, I
usually had 16-18 400g loaves in the freezer by 11pm without too much mess
to clean up. This morning, my kitchen is a wreck;-( With all the strain
with which I subjected it , the spindle cracked and is now being replaced.
It will get another good work-out making pastry at xmas.
Graham


  #25 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 04:52 PM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

Thanks a LOT for all these options. I hardly bake (except for bread)

and
this recipe has got me started. The last week I've made a couple of

loaves
of bread in the food processor. You've been a source of encouragement
regarding using the fp for doughs. So I appreciate from you your
information about how to get this cinnamon roll recipe halved and

adapted
to
the fp.
Your information filed under: "Cinnamon rolls."
Dee


I like to bake but I detest cleaning up. My kitchen is small an it
doesn't
take much to turn it into a disaster zone. Since I have an open floor
plan,
it is like cooking in the living room, so I just can't close the door

and
hide a big mess. I find the food processor is a great help in

preventing
a
mess when baking. When I use the stand mixer I inevitably send a cloud

of
flour across the kitchen. The FP contains he mess and makes quick work

of
producing bread dough and pie pastry. I have learned to use it for

cookie
dough and quick-bread batter.

I used my Cuisinart for many years to make bread dough until I bought the
Bosch to make large quantities of pain-au-levain. Starting at 6pm, I
usually had 16-18 400g loaves in the freezer by 11pm without too much mess
to clean up. This morning, my kitchen is a wreck;-( With all the strain
with which I subjected it , the spindle cracked and is now being replaced.
It will get another good work-out making pastry at xmas.
Graham


You will have to share your holiday pastry recipes.




  #26 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 18-09-2005, 06:18 PM
Dee Randall
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"graham" wrote in message
news:[email protected]

"Vox Humana" wrote in message
. ..

"Dee Randall" wrote in message
...

Thanks a LOT for all these options. I hardly bake (except for bread) and
this recipe has got me started. The last week I've made a couple of

loaves
of bread in the food processor. You've been a source of encouragement
regarding using the fp for doughs. So I appreciate from you your
information about how to get this cinnamon roll recipe halved and
adapted

to
the fp.
Your information filed under: "Cinnamon rolls."
Dee


I like to bake but I detest cleaning up. My kitchen is small an it
doesn't
take much to turn it into a disaster zone. Since I have an open floor
plan,
it is like cooking in the living room, so I just can't close the door and
hide a big mess. I find the food processor is a great help in preventing
a
mess when baking. When I use the stand mixer I inevitably send a cloud
of
flour across the kitchen. The FP contains he mess and makes quick work
of
producing bread dough and pie pastry. I have learned to use it for
cookie
dough and quick-bread batter.

I used my Cuisinart for many years to make bread dough until I bought the
Bosch to make large quantities of pain-au-levain. Starting at 6pm, I
usually had 16-18 400g loaves in the freezer by 11pm without too much mess
to clean up. This morning, my kitchen is a wreck;-( With all the strain
with which I subjected it , the spindle cracked and is now being replaced.
It will get another good work-out making pastry at xmas.
Graham

What a monster machine!
Dee


  #27 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2005, 01:51 AM
Alex Rast
 
Posts: n/a
Default

at Sat, 17 Sep 2005 00:47:57 GMT in
, (Vox
Humana) wrote :


"Alex Rast" wrote in message
.. .
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in
,
(Dee
Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls
that turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? ...
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp
crust, pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most
importantly, not tooth-aching sweetness.


The sweetness and the intensity of the cinnamon are nearly entirely
attributable to the filling and topping. There is a limit to the amount
of sugar you can add to yeast dough before it fails to perform, so it is
unlikely that the dough is the sauce of too much sweetness unless your
threshold for sweetness is very low.

I use the recipe for sweet dough that is in the Kitchen Aid stand mixer
cookbook. I roll that out, slather it with butter, sprinkle with brown
sugar and then with cinnamon. I don't measure the ingredients for the
filling. You can control the texture of the crust by the length of
baking, the sweetness by moderating the sugar in the filling, the
intensity of the cinnamon by using it sparingly. I think much of the
cloying sweetness of the Cinnamon product is from the mountain of
frosting they slather on it.
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter
2 pkgs. yeast
1/3 cup of warm water ( 105-115F)
3 eggs
5/12 to 6 1/2 cups AP flour


Thanks for the recipe! Boy, does that look like a lot of butter, at least
relative to the amounts of fat I'm used to putting into most breads with
any fat at all. I can see the idea, though - you'd want a reasonable amount
to crisp the outside well. I suspect part of the key to the kind of texture
and taste is the ratio of milk - specifically, I'm suspicious I'm looking
for a recipe with a hefty dose. 1/2 cup sugar doesn't sound wildly
excessive, although I'm tempted to reduce it to 1/3 cup. But I will try
first of all exactly as specified, because guessing before testing gives me
no reference to compare against.

I might also want to experiment with a longer rise, much like ordinary
breads, for a yeastier flavour. However, I'm wary of doing this to extremes
with sweet breads. I can see possibilities for various undesirable runaway
effects.

Cinnabons are sweet in every component. The roll dough is sweet, the
filling is insanely sweet, and so is the frosting. Mountain of frosting is
about right. Check out the proportions on the roll I called out. That's
more realistic (as well as more practical to eat).

On cinnamon intensity vs. harshness, I've found that the key point is to
use Ceylon cinnamon. Much better, warmer, less sharp flavour. However,
cinnamon is perhaps the most potent spice of all, and I find too often
people (like Cinnabon), use it very heavy-handedly. What do you think about
mixing butter, sugar, and cinnamon first, then spreading it out on the
dough? The build-up you suggest sounds to me like it might lead to another
effect that I'm not really fond of - cinnamon rolls that "unroll" when you
pull on them. What I've seen is that often in these rolls, the cinnamon and
butter, done in layered fashion as you describe, act a bit like greasing a
pan, preventing the rolls from staying whole. My idea is to have a filling
that actually bonds the spiral together.



--
Alex Rast

(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
  #28 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2005, 02:25 AM
Susan
 
Posts: n/a
Default


This is the recipe that I use - the resulting rolls look like the cinnamon
bun pic from harvestlanecandleco.com on your google images.


Cinnamon Rolls

2 packages dry yeast 8 tablespoons (1 stick or 1/2 cup) butter,
softened
1/4 cup warm water 3 eggs*
1 cup milk, warmed 5 1/4 to 5 3/4 cups flour
1/2 cup sugar
2 teaspoons salt

*Note: If eggs are refrigerator cold, pour hot water over them and let stand
for several
minutes before cracking.

Sprinkle the yeast over the warm water in a small cup or bowl, stir, and let
stand
for a minute or so to dissolve. Combine the milk, sugar, salt, butter, and
eggs in
a large mixing bowl, and beat well. Stir in the dissolved yeast. Add 2 1/2
cups of
the flour, and beat until smooth and well blended. Add 2 1/2 cups more flour
and beat until the dough holds together in a rough, shaggy mass.

Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for a minute or two. Let
rest for
10 minutes.

Resume kneading for 8 to 10 minutes more, gradually sprinkling on a little
more
flour if the dough sticks to your hands, until smooth and elastic. Place in
a
greased bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place until double
in bulk.

Filling

6 Tablespoons (3/4 stick or about 1/3 cup) butter, softened
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 Tablespoons cinnamon

Punch the risen dough down, and roll it on a floured surface to a rectangle
about
32 x 12 inches and 1/3 inch thick. Spread the softened butter on the dough
and
sprinkle the sugar and cinnamon mixture evenly over the buttered dough.
Beginning with a wide end, roll the dough up like a jelly roll, then cut
into pieces
about 1 - 1 1/4 inches wide. Place pieces cut side down in buttered pans,
cover, and
let rise until double in bulk.

Bake in a preheated oven at 375 degrees for about 25 minutes, until golden
brown.



I don't care for icing on my cinnamon rolls, but of course you could drizzle
with your favorite


  #29 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2005, 03:08 AM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Susan" wrote in message
. ..

This is the recipe that I use - the resulting rolls look like the cinnamon
bun pic from harvestlanecandleco.com on your google images.


Cinnamon Rolls

2 packages dry yeast 8 tablespoons (1 stick or 1/2 cup) butter,
softened
1/4 cup warm water 3 eggs*
1 cup milk, warmed 5 1/4 to 5 3/4 cups flour
1/2 cup sugar
2 teaspoons salt

*Note: If eggs are refrigerator cold, pour hot water over them and let

stand
for several
minutes before cracking.

Sprinkle the yeast over the warm water in a small cup or bowl, stir, and

let
stand
for a minute or so to dissolve. Combine the milk, sugar, salt, butter, and
eggs in
a large mixing bowl, and beat well. Stir in the dissolved yeast. Add 2 1/2
cups of
the flour, and beat until smooth and well blended. Add 2 1/2 cups more

flour
and beat until the dough holds together in a rough, shaggy mass.

Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for a minute or two. Let
rest for
10 minutes.

Resume kneading for 8 to 10 minutes more, gradually sprinkling on a little
more
flour if the dough sticks to your hands, until smooth and elastic. Place

in
a
greased bowl, cover and let rise in a warm place until double
in bulk.

Filling

6 Tablespoons (3/4 stick or about 1/3 cup) butter, softened
1/2 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 Tablespoons cinnamon

Punch the risen dough down, and roll it on a floured surface to a

rectangle
about
32 x 12 inches and 1/3 inch thick. Spread the softened butter on the dough
and
sprinkle the sugar and cinnamon mixture evenly over the buttered dough.
Beginning with a wide end, roll the dough up like a jelly roll, then cut
into pieces
about 1 - 1 1/4 inches wide. Place pieces cut side down in buttered pans,
cover, and
let rise until double in bulk.

Bake in a preheated oven at 375 degrees for about 25 minutes, until golden
brown.



I don't care for icing on my cinnamon rolls, but of course you could

drizzle
with your favorite


That is almost exactly the same recipe I posted.


  #30 (permalink)   Report Post  
Old 19-09-2005, 03:24 AM
Vox Humana
 
Posts: n/a
Default


"Alex Rast" wrote in message
...
at Sat, 17 Sep 2005 00:47:57 GMT in
, (Vox
Humana) wrote :


"Alex Rast" wrote in message
.. .
at Wed, 14 Sep 2005 01:28:45 GMT in
,
(Dee
Randall) wrote :


Here are a few pictures of cinnamon rolls
http://images.google.com/images?q=cinnamon+roll&hl=en

Speaking of recipes - does anyone have a recipe for cinnamon rolls
that turn out rather like PD_Cinnamon_roll_95_g_lyrical_2? ...
I'm looking for - a rather bready, moist roll with a slightly crisp
crust, pronounced but not aggressive cinnamon flavour, and most
importantly, not tooth-aching sweetness.


The sweetness and the intensity of the cinnamon are nearly entirely
attributable to the filling and topping. There is a limit to the amount
of sugar you can add to yeast dough before it fails to perform, so it is
unlikely that the dough is the sauce of too much sweetness unless your
threshold for sweetness is very low.

I use the recipe for sweet dough that is in the Kitchen Aid stand mixer
cookbook. I roll that out, slather it with butter, sprinkle with brown
sugar and then with cinnamon. I don't measure the ingredients for the
filling. You can control the texture of the crust by the length of
baking, the sweetness by moderating the sugar in the filling, the
intensity of the cinnamon by using it sparingly. I think much of the
cloying sweetness of the Cinnamon product is from the mountain of
frosting they slather on it.
3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup sugar
1 1/4 tsp salt
1/2 cup butter
2 pkgs. yeast
1/3 cup of warm water ( 105-115F)
3 eggs
5/12 to 6 1/2 cups AP flour


Thanks for the recipe! Boy, does that look like a lot of butter, at least
relative to the amounts of fat I'm used to putting into most breads with
any fat at all. I can see the idea, though - you'd want a reasonable

amount
to crisp the outside well. I suspect part of the key to the kind of

texture
and taste is the ratio of milk - specifically, I'm suspicious I'm looking
for a recipe with a hefty dose. 1/2 cup sugar doesn't sound wildly
excessive, although I'm tempted to reduce it to 1/3 cup. But I will try
first of all exactly as specified, because guessing before testing gives

me
no reference to compare against.

I might also want to experiment with a longer rise, much like ordinary
breads, for a yeastier flavour. However, I'm wary of doing this to

extremes
with sweet breads. I can see possibilities for various undesirable runaway
effects.

Cinnabons are sweet in every component. The roll dough is sweet, the
filling is insanely sweet, and so is the frosting. Mountain of frosting is
about right. Check out the proportions on the roll I called out. That's
more realistic (as well as more practical to eat).

On cinnamon intensity vs. harshness, I've found that the key point is to
use Ceylon cinnamon. Much better, warmer, less sharp flavour. However,
cinnamon is perhaps the most potent spice of all, and I find too often
people (like Cinnabon), use it very heavy-handedly. What do you think

about
mixing butter, sugar, and cinnamon first, then spreading it out on the
dough? The build-up you suggest sounds to me like it might lead to another
effect that I'm not really fond of - cinnamon rolls that "unroll" when you
pull on them. What I've seen is that often in these rolls, the cinnamon

and
butter, done in layered fashion as you describe, act a bit like greasing a
pan, preventing the rolls from staying whole. My idea is to have a filling
that actually bonds the spiral together.


I find that with the high sugar and butter content, the rise can often take
a long time, especially at cool room temperature. I tend to like the
intense cinnamon flavor and often supplement it with a combination of
freshly ground allspice and nutmeg. All three spices are high in eugenol -
that distinctive clove flavor. Maybe its because I'm a dentist and eugenol
is in a lot of dental products, that I am fond of or desensitized to the
flavor. I know I have overdone the spices when they cause acid reflux!

I can do without the thick coat of frosting. I make some cream cheese
frosting and if anyone wants frosting, they can add their own. My partner
will go to the supermarket in a blizzard to get cream cheese for the
frosting if I haven't remembered (or bothered) to buy it. I would rather
drizzle a glaze of flat icing over the warm rolls and call it quits. In the
KitchenAid cookbook, they recommend a sauce that is made from sweetened
condensed milk, as I recall, that I have never considered making. That is
way too sweet for me - sort of like that bread pudding recipe that is made
with KripyKream glazed doughnuts and sweetened condensed milk. It would be
enough to cause a diabetic shock!

As for mixing all the filling components and then spreading them, that is
the standard method. I'm just lazy and don't want to measure the
ingredients or dirty another bowl. That's why I just build the filling,
dispensing the components right from their containers. I never thought
about the "unrolling" issue. Sometimes if I place them close together they
sometime "telescope" while rising.




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